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THE GIFT OF A DREADNOUGHT

(To tha Editor.? Sir, —In last' night's "Star" I read an account of a meeting o£ the Trades Council, and I ami sure that those who spoke censuring Sir. Joseph Ward and his Ministers do not represent the views of the majority wf the workers throughout the Dominion. One is reminded of the Tooley-street tailors—"We are the men." Their egotism is wonderful. The whole Ministry, Boards of Education, City Councils, Harbour Boards, and every other body but them are fools. "We are the- men," and the remarks by some only tend to displiy their ignorance. If Germany and Britain ever go to wait, the struggle would be in the North Sea, and if it so happened that the Germans were victorious, then a bolt would be made for these colonies. I do not thinK

the West Indies would be in the programme. The British have always a strong fleet there. Australia and New Zealand would be the mark. The Australian coastline is equal to all Europe. New Zealand's nearly equal to Britain. Now, it takes two years, with every up-to-date appliance, to build one Dreadnought, and yet one of the speakers advocates starting iron-making. I won der how long it would take to build the plant for this work, let alone the building of the vessels. It is not quite so easy as making a pair of boots. It will be a long time before this country will try it. Germany has started lately. The action of Mr. T.. E. Taylor, in my opinion, -was a ;very unwise one, and I venture to say that if he resigned his seat and/ sought a re-election, he would himself be nowhere. The Trades Council would do much better to leave such things as the defence of the British Empire to those who know something I about it.—l am, die, J. H. CORNISH, Shipwright. (To the Editor.) , Sir, —As a New Zealander, it raises a spirit of disgust to think that any man in "God's own country" should be so mad as to disapprove of the action of our Premier in guarding our homes, our flag and liberty by the offer of aid to defend. Tommy Taylor and his goose, if he could make her gabble, would be helping the nation if he said, "Ward, you did not go far enough. You should urge England to declare war against Germany at once, for the menace to Britain which her present naval policy involves. If France were to concentrate an army on the German frontier, how long would the Kaiser remain quiet? The people of New Zealand say, "Well done, Ward! The right time and place," and so say we all!—I am, etc., TRUE BRITON.

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THE GIFT OF A DREADNOUGHT Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 79, 2 April 1909

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