Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SELWYN'S CENTENARY.

■A sx. joH:ys college building FUND. The proposal to celebrate in some practical way the centenary of (Bishop Selwyn found expression at "a'public meeting in Holy Trinity Schoolroom, Devonport, last evening, at which Mr. Edward ißartley presided.

_ The-vicar, the Eev. M. Sutton, in urging a general celebration throughout the Dominion of the Selwyn centenary, pointed out the oppositeness of such a course with the present movement, when the Empire -so needed men of big visions and -ideas of service. Bishop Selwyn himself was a man of an intense national spirit, and spent his life unselfishly as an exponent of that idea. He (the speaker) • considered New Zealand's recent offer of a battleship to the Mother Country to have been grand as an example oi national spirit, and it was our duty to perpetuate such a spirit, so that in the future it might even intensify. He suggested a fitting celebration of the centenary of such a man as "Bishop Selwyn as an excelleat means of promoting this spirit. To Bishop Selwyn the nation would be for ever indebted, and he was a man of whom the Church had a right to be proud. As a practical method of observing the centenary, Mr. Sutton suggested some step that would -benefit one of our colleges. There was nothing in ithis country, he pointed out, that could •take the place of the public schools and ttnjvensrties at Home, for fostering those ■grand ideas upon which our Empire had been built. It was an object lesson to note how the inspiration that influenced the life work of our great Empire builders could be traced back to their school and college life. And, therefore, it was. onr duty to develope similar institutions that might in thJs country perpetuate the grand Christian and Imperial ideals of our forefathers. And he suggested St. John's College, Tama'ki, as a place that might be made worthy of its illustrious founder, and a place where men might get all that the best collegiate life could give. .A shilling subscription from the Church people (throughout New Zealand might result in making the Patteson wing a rea-ltty, and he therefrom an epoch in our Church life. Other parts of the Empire had already got the collegiate syaifcem in conjunction with their universities, and here was an excellent opportunity for the beginning of collegiate life in Auckland. Other religious bodies would soon co-operate with their own colleges, and an asset would be won to our national life of which we might well be proud. The centenary committee in England had recommended as objects for Bupport Sehvyn College, Cambridge, and St. John's College, Auckland. Clearly, therefore, those here who desired, to take practical part in the celebration would wish collected moneys to he devoted to St. John's College. Although an Anglican foundation, it offered college facilities to men, not only of different schools of thought, but to men studying for other professions than the ministry. But the history of the Anglican Church proved that she was nothing if not national, which was as it should be.

A committee was appointed to carry out the following unanimous resolution: "That we start a. dhilling fund ait Devonport for a grant to- the building fund of St. John's College, in commemoration of the centenary* of Bishop Selwyn's birth."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
553

SELWYN'S CENTENARY. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 78, 1 April 1909

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working