Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE STORYTELLER.

HER CONCERN.

A fashionable lady has a pet parrot, of which she is very fond. A few days j ago her husband was monkeying with the parrot, when he suddenly cried out in anguish and danced round the room, holding his fingers in his Tiiouth. "fJood frracious! What's the matter. Charles?" r-aid the lady. "That parrot,' , ejaculated | the suffering man. "I hope you haven't hurt the dear bird. "Xo; but the dear bird has bitten a piece out of my finger." i ' ; Oood goodness! I hope it didn't bite Jit clean out.' , "Yes. it did." "I wish ; you would be more careful, Charles. The man I bought that bird from told mc not to let it taste meat under any circumstances."

YOU KNOW THE MAW. I

Most of us are acquainted with i.i» ; person who asks obvious questions - t h< , j sort of man who stops you in the ir.uhllr ' of a headlong rush and asks you if mvj are in a hurry. Mr. K. is one el tin■>■■ pests, and during a walk abroad the oilier morning lie paused in astonishment out- j side a friend's house. Before in stood ; three huge moving vans: the lawn \\.ialmost covered with articles of furni- i ture of various sorts, pictures, wardrobes, ! i and china. And there was his old friend 8., begrimed, weary, and ill-tempered, ! directing operations in his shirt sleeves, j "What, B.!' , exclaimed .Mr. E.; "'are' you moving? " ! "Not at all—not at all!"' snapped, with elaborate sarcasm. " I'm taking my fur- j niture out for a ride!"

DRESS REFORM NEEDED.

Mrs. J. Gardiner Merritt. the sculptor, I is very fond of illustrating the nped of dress reform for women by the foilo-wing experience: "I heard a young man, a rather lazy young man, tell a pretty girl the other day that he envied woman her idleness, that he would like to have been born a woman. "The girl, tossing her head and snorting, answered: ""You'd like to be a woman! oh. yes! Just try it for a day! Fasten a blanket and a counterpane round your legs: buckle a Ftrap round your wai«t so tig.it you can't draw a full breath or eat j a hearty meal: have your hair all loose and fluffy; so that it keeps tickling your | e.ars and getting into your eyes: wear high-heeled sTioes and gloves a size too j I small for you: cover your face with a I veil full of spots, that make you squint; fix a huge hat on with pins, si that every time the wind blows it pulls your hair out by the roots; and then, without any pockets, and with a thrpe-inch square of lace to blow your nose with, go for a -walk and enjoy yourself. You would like it!" .

The creditors of Recce Nicholson, fisherman and oil-vendor, trading as K. I XMoholson and Son. mc: at thp office of | the official assignee to-day. No statement of affairs «ras presented, and the I meeting was a'djoumed for a week in : 1 order that the attendance of the debtor's I j wife might be enioroed. |

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
520

THE STORYTELLER. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 66, 18 March 1909

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working