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FASHION NOTES.

... 'Already we ktiffft a great deal anent ' the millinery- for "th? late autumn and .jnhfer, : liiit not until tlie wearers of j sttnfeter hilts' Mve" Vuddenly awakened to the fact that dusty blossoms and Bbie-coiotired/ faded straws are no j longer fit for ahy more exalted position I tiiaii the'shelf, "will the full significance of the .Mliherial revelations fee appre- j elate*!: ' l • Whatever may be the ultimate fate, of IBe Difeccoire'gdwn, the Direetoire hat will make a brave show this autumn, j Velvet will, of course, play a conspicuous: part, idle huge velvet; brim being tamed down after the fashion of the | true model; of the period, while it is tied under 'the chin with a soft satin ribbon, affording tho mo3t becoming j ■frame to the face. It is specially mer■'riful to. the complexion of the woman jwsi; her first youth, and gives a soft i velvety appearance to dark eyes of whatever tint they may chance to be. On the important subject of veils I nnist : .give my readers a useful hint. I Exceedingly becoming is the veil of finest nut-brown tulle, dotted .all over, with tiny black pin spots. This. is rather i expensive, but it is exquisitely flattering to the complexion. The tulle pf the veil must be in the true nut-brown shade, I and the pin-spots very light and close together. I have seen a veil of the same genre in navy blue tulle with black J pin-spots, but this would not be so generally becoming. At the same time it'would lend great charm to a toque of navy velvet with a border of Persian paw. Very pale blue tulle veils lock delightfully festive in winter, and the same may be said of pale rose-pink tulle dotted over with black chenille pinspots. The Parisiennes are particularly fohd of veils of fine filet net, but these Tequire to be specially well worn, and by the right woman, with the right hat. A" filet net veil may easily destroy, the purity of the complexion. Time cannot wither nor custom stale the everlasting joys of navy serge, and nothing would be less surprising than to find this Usurping the position of a leading vogue again in the coming season, so many things point that way in style and trimming, added to which there is always a strong predilection for its favour. Meanwhile silk velvet advances in leaps and bounds. The allvelvet gown meets so many of the prevailing afternoon vicissitudes, while for visiting the long black Direetoire coat supplemented by handsome furs is one of the most covetable tilings of the hour.

serviceable talking length. The smart little .double-breasted blouse is worn over a' tiny vest of tucked muslin. A liriefa hat is worn, of the same colour as the frock, lined with black silk, and finished with a scatf.A SEASON OP ART-COLOURS. That the hat makes the costume is indisputably demonstrated .this season. Frock fabrics for street wear are ; so quiet in their misty grays, dull greens, dusky fruit tones and cool, dark blues, that if there is to be any vivid colour note, the hat must strike it. Yet the hat colours managed by marvellous milliner skill, strike no jarring discords. Some of the quiet street costumes are relieved by hats which are veritable revelations in harmonious colour effects. A seal brown beaver chapcau is trimmed with a twisted scarf of brown velvet faced with geranium red, the ends Of the scarf passing through a dead gold buckle.

A Direetoire coat and skirt suit of taupe gray was matched by a huge hat of taupe zibeline, faced under the brim with golden yellow velvet. At one side swept a gorgeous paradise olume of shaded yellows.

A SEASON OF SOFT HUES. The spectacular character of the new hats is all in the shapes and manner of -trimming. Colourings are subdued with an increasing tendency toward

" art" tones, and blurs of harmonising colour. Just now these is a furore for gray shades —smoke a-nd the slightly less cold taupe, or mole gray. Vapour and elephant—quite different in suggestion —are realiy much alike in tone. The blues show a leaning toward the rich Byzantine influence; canard, peacock and other greenish blues leading. In the genuine blues a deep " stone" blue like the exquisite colouring of the Imari jars of Japan is a favourite: Beds follow the fruit and berry shades, and purple in familiar tones has new names of "aniefchyst," " wistaria," and " orchid." SLEEVES. The tight sleeves tucked horizontally, reaching to the wrist, are more worn than anything else, and as the cold weather advances everyone is glad that she can have the protection of a long sleeve, for we feel cold greatly in the arms. The evening sleeves are short, and cling closely to the, anns, or are long, transparent to the wrist.

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FASHION NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 65, 17 March 1909

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