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THE RACING WORLD.

(By WHALEBOKBJ

RACING mXT'Oßtfa.

March 17, 18 — Ohlnemurt J.C Annual March 17 ana 18 — Napier Park R.C. A«- ---| tumn [ March 24, 25 — South Canterbury J.C. Autumn March 24, 25 — Taranakl J.C. Atttnthn I March 27, 81, April 8 — A.T.C. Autumn ' April 1, a — Masterton B.C. Autumn

April 1, 8 — Nelson J.C, Annual April 3 — North Canterbury J.C. flick I April-10, 12 — W&lrarapa B.C. Autumn ! April. 10, 12, 13 t- Auckland B.C. Autumn April io, 12,14,17 — A.J.C. Autumn • April; 12 — Patea R.C. Annual Meeting i April 12, 18 — FeihUng J.C. Eastci I April 12, 18 i-. C.J.C. Autumn April 21, 24 — Wellington B.C. Autuma April 24, 28—Avondale J.C. Autumn , April 28, 29 — Manawatu B.C. Autumn M*Jfß, 6 — Hawke's Bay J.C. A&r.nni& 34 — Takapuna J.C Winter Tire B'taejaeket omco Waiotahi, which acIwuated.jfor a double at the Thames, Is now •trained .by B. Winder. The OMlgado—G-Mintad youngster, (which tF&SP *sWe<i5 We<i *° * be lwt * >"* eono Into F. mil's charge at BUersMe. M <>n»e's adjustments for toe Ewtw 'Handicap, Brighton Hind**, and Autumn "Steeplechase are due on Friday nextki TJ 5?£ *E'is? 1 i «*«<*»« ot the Avondale Jockey Club takes place on April 24 and 658. Won particulars will be advertised later.J* -) - i TbCScrack South Australian sprinter Lord Carlyen was Bold ln Melbourne recently for Bf»gns, and It ls understood goes to India. s< S ——— The bred horse Pilot, which Is delv the Sydney papers as a hack steeplechaser, has been purchased by J. Scoble |or 350gs. The iSeaton Delaval mare Cantata changed hands recently through the agency of Mr. J. ChadSrtck, but the name of the purchaser has yet transpired. S Two ||kls dividends were paid at the Thamesion Saturday by Kaitangata and Tenby, tin second in the Hurdles and Hack race respectively. th« Waikato trainer, B. Hannon, had several horses at the Thames, only two —Master Paul «nd Walmiitn—-were produced to fulfil their engagements. A. outer, one of New Zealand's foremost horseman, left for Australia last week. Oliver lariat present riding in splendid form, nnd should do well on the other side. The mishap to young McMillan at the! Thames t }s not as serious as once thought, and there is every probability of his being able to \ tesiime riding again shortly. OF. L. iSpeakman, who has been on the I retired HSt fot some considerable time, has •been gran-ted a. three months' license by the Auckland Metropolitan Committee. All sotJB of rumours si* afloat in connection wltli the T disqualifications of cne Club, and if half one -hears ls true, sQnie more sensations are promised. Acceptances for all events on the Opening day ot ?.the Anckland Trotting Club's ■Autumn Meeting close with the secretary "Mr. C. f: Mark) ou Friday next, the 19th lust., at 9 p.m. The Pa.jmlmi*a Racing Club's annual meeting takes i>lace on Saturday next, the 20th lust. Special trains have been arranged, particulars of Whloh will be found in our adverH-slng columns. Acceptances for the Enster HanHlcap, Brigbton .Hurdles, and Autumn Steeplechase, and nominations ior . the minor events at the A.R.C. Autumn Meeting, ate not due until Friday, the 20th lnst. It is anticipated that a loss of something like £2500 i will be experienced over the V.X.C. Autumn meeting. This will not i be so much as It appears, as the Club In-1 creased the stakes oil this occasion by £1250 When running well forward ln the Maiden Plate at the recent Thames meeting, Arlstoa broke a blood Vessel lh hts head, and speedily dropped back. Had the mishap not occurred, Arlstos may have troubled the winner, J. , I It ls stated that Mr S. P. Mackay, the: owner of Soiiltline, presented W. McLachlan, | the rider, with £500 for winning the Newmarket Handicap, and that his thiee Winning rides on the son of Soult brought him In £750. The New Zealand horseman T. Cahill had a run of bad luck in the March Steeplechase at Flemlngton. He was fined £2 for disobedience at the post, and was also reprimanded for not riding his mount (Pilot) out. The Eton gelding -Noteorlnl was unlucky •to have been, beaten in the Welter Handicap at the Thames, aud his defeat was mainly due to the riding of iR. E. Brown on Waiotahi, who outrode his namesake, C. Brown, who made a xerj feeble attempt ot a finish. The old Muskapeer gelding Newiown, which it was.,thought at one Urn. would never race again, was seen out in at the Thame*', and pulled up apparently sound after his efforts. If he was kept till the ground was. softer, and then put to the jumping game, the probabilities are he would win a decent hurdle race. The Leolant-ls gelding Kapakapa looked big and lusty, when he went out to contest the Hurdle Race at the Thames, and under the circumstances ran a very good race; but when he pulled up he seemed very tender lv front, and oh appearance It will take his trainer all hlSi time to keep him on his feet. In the eight events at the Thames only three ridero succeeded in getting their names on to the winning list. R. E. 'Brown, who was In good form, rode four winners (Waiotahi (2), Jena, and Hlkuai), Perclvai won a double (Carmanla and Freemantle), and McE'tanon rode Okaihau In the Hurdles and Steeplechase.

Although mo6t accounts of the Newmarket made it appear that Dunolly was catching Soultllne, the "Sporting Judge" says the former was in front half-way, was leading two lengths two fmiongs from home, was a c"ear length ln front passing the stipendiary stewards' stand, aud was still there at the distance. loung Ferguson undoubtedly thought he had the race won, and that won it for Soultllne.

In lihe steeplechase at the Thauiee last 'Saturday were 'two full brothers ln Capitol and 'Red McGregor, competing, both being by Leolantls from Jean; but whereas the form*r finished second, ■the latter disgraced himself by falling at the fourth fence, it ls stated that the .pair were once shown in double harness at one of the Waikato shows, when they secured winning honours.

English files give news of the death of Kirkham, which was one of the horses bred by the late Hon. J. White to English time, With a view to winning the English Derby. In the big classical event he cut a very poor figure, aud iv a field of eight he was not in the first four. That was Klrkham's last appearance on the turf, and he subsequently found his way to Ireland, where he was fairly successful at the stud. One of his sons, Klrkland, won the Liverpool Grand National, while another, Klrko, rolled honie first in the Irish Grand National.

Iv racing, unique experiences are often met with, but 6ne that occurred to the writer last Saturday was about as uncommon a one as falls to the lot of anyone. Visiting the Thames meeting, I had the pleasure of seeing Okaihau win the double, Hurdles aud Steeplechase, and ou airivlng back in Auckland in the small hours of the morning, I gladly accepted a lift home from the well-knowu Ellerslie trainer, J. B. Williamson, aiid doing duty lh the shafts, was none other than Salvadah, the sire Of Okathau; so that after the son had duly landed my modest bets on him in his races, his father conveyed mc home. - Salvadan ls a beautiful trap! horse, with a splendid even action, and Is more sensible than numbers of human beings. Bis services to farmers, wanting good trap horses or hunters should be much 1 sought after next season,

The appeal la the Incto disqualification Sse hal bses furthrf adjourned by th 4 etropolltaa committee, but It Is under* stood a decision 1» to be given to-morrow j (Thursday) evening. It It now six months since ths allseed malpractice took place* 'Arid It Mem* it takes as long to come to a decision as a, case ln ChamSery. If mush mois time Is spent some ot those charged I will haT« completed their sentence before ' the case U determlnsd.

I The performance <C Okaihau, by wlnntag both hurdles and rcteeplecbus at the 'Thomed, was A moat merltbrJous <mS, aad the son of Sdl'tMaa gives- promise o* developing into a useful iepper. Ira the steeplechase, -Okaihau fenced with confidence, and in courersatldh with -his trainer-owner after the 'race, he Informed line that beyond Jumping a Couple of stone walls ln a. paddock naar the stiables, the ihbese bad oaver been I schooled over a steepl-echose fence. Under the circumstances, and considering fie Is ionly a toM-y-eatf-old.' it ■•#lll h* seen t»«t I Okaihau Is evidently a natural Jumper, and 100 ode would begrudge his owner a victory wefe he to triumph dn one of •the Nationals .during the tfotth-cduiiliiia season.

i nxre seen Some splendid anights for the Ohamplan States (says * Sydney waiter), and "though that on Saturday did not reach the highest standard If was very exciting, and well worthy the rephtathm of the great three-mdle event. Though Pendll Scored, -artier a desperate struggle by a bead, the honoarft of the race were with 'Sifjnor, as he made the running- ail the way, though the rafrat half of the -trying journey w«s Certainly sub at a slow pace. The New Zealhnder seem* such a trn* stayer that I am Inclined to .think thai Cameron would .have done better to ihave given him his head ■earlier. NeV-fcrflreleSs, Penftli was always .going strongly, arid a mile from home was galloping so easily as to enggest a rather comfortable tvih. JSHgnor, ffsWfev*f. Is evidently all grit, «nd, waffle Pendll Had a clear lead at the half-distance, his opponent answered Cameron's call co resolutely that only the Judge could place them*i}ast the post. As the winner started Eavourlte, the public we're <plea»ett, and a cordial greeting Was gl-ven horse and .rddear far 'their jterlir g 'performance. At the same time, 'Signal made many friends by tie way he shaped, and he Is not fa* from first-class, while I doubt it we hare seen * more consistent performer.

In writing of the bookmaklng trouble, a writer in the "Evening Post says: — Th* racing clubs disclaim any responsibility whenever bookmakers repudiate their liabilities. Thig ie merely a quibble, and the clubs would be studying thelf own Interests by Insisting upon some evidence Of financial stability before issuing licenses to each and every applicant. It is astonishing hovf Quickly a punter sickens of the racing game if he is balanced ontie or twice, and this, ln the loflg run, means Iras of revenue to the clubs. It ls not suggested that the safeguards should be so autocratic as to prevent new fielders coming Into the game. Competition Is an excellent thing lln bookmaklng, and anything approaching a trust regulating the odds is to be strongly deprecated. Not that there li much fear of that, as the. totalisator Is always an ac|Mve competitor for business. Tbe Dannevlrke incident, where a bookmaker apparently took undue risks with VI, ought to cause the whole question of the licensing iof bookmakers to be taken up by the Racing Conference, with a view to the framing of suitable regulations, both ln the iriterleats of the betting public and the decent I section of bookmakers.

'■TURF TALK: FROM THE SOUTH.

I (By Telegraph.—Special to "Stan") • CHBISTCHUBCH, Tuesday. There is still no sign of rain, and the tracks at Blccurton are getting harder and harder each day. A lot of useful work IS being got through, In View of the Easter meetings, but trainers are anxiously awaiting rain so as. to be able to give their charges solid gallops. Murray Hobbs returned from an extended trip to England Inst week, hut 1 don't ! faricv he will set up as a public trainer arain. The South Canterbury. Jockey Club's i meeting, which takes plafce next week, promises to be one of the meat Successful ever held at Timaru. The club had decided to charge bookmakers £20 per day, a sum that local metalllc&nS object to as being excessive.

The veteran steeplechaser Slow Tom has been recommissioned, but. his joints look afe If strong work will hot agree with them. When being Indulged in a ehort spell after his exertions at Akaroa, Sant RosaJeer took fright when running about in the paddock. Tjhfottuhately he ciune in Contact With a fence, and sustained a severe cut, which had to be stitched up. This will prevent the Sant Ilarlo gelding fulfilling any of his immediate engagements.

Vologda, Which went lame after racing at Dunedin, has been sent to her Owner's place at Ashburton for a spell. Burcleuch, under P. McUrath's care, ls Improving steadily; but with the tracks so hard, I am afraid his mentor can hardly have the big fellow at anything like his best for the Easter meetings. Cressett, a racy looking sister to Millionaire, has joined E. Cutta* team. She ls a promising Sort, and has already demonstrated her ability to gallop fast. Euclid, the half brother to Solution, which has been running in a trap for some time past, is in work again. B. King made a good recovery from the effects of his fail at the Akatoa meeting, and expects to be riding at Waimate meeting. He is confident that Bulletin would have won the Welter Handicap had he not fallen.

1 hear ou the best of authority that Downfall's bruised heel Is Still giving his trainer considerable trouble, and this being so, Mr Lowry's proposed trip to Australia with the New Zealand Cup winner and Bobrikoff has been abandoned for the present, i

Mr Henry's adjustments for the C.J.C. Great Easter and Great Autumn Handicaps are due on Friday next. The Wellington horseman, A. Olliver, left for Australia oh Friday last to follow his calling there. During the past two seasons Olliver has had a most successful career, his victories Including the Wanganui Cup, Manawatu Cup, Dunedin Cup, C.J.C. Challenge Stakes, Hawke's Bay Stakes, C.J.C. Winter Cup, and Stewards' Handicap. He has been retained .to ride Artillerie in her engagements at the A.J.C. autumn meeting. That Ally Is lOoked oh as being by fat the best treated of all the New Zealand horses engaged in the Doncaster Handicap, and is likely to start at a short price. Myosotls put up a remarkable performance at New Brighton on Saturday, and One that stamps her as being the speediest pacer that ever raced on that track, '.though the cdlirse was not In feartleularl* fast order, the daughter of Huon reeled off her first half mile lv the Telegraph Handicap in the phenomenal time of 1.5, and finished tip the full journey in 2.13, after having had to pass eight other Competitors. This is easily a race record for New Zealand, either in saddle or harness. Myosotls was ridden by A. Wilson, and the. pair came in for a great ovation On returning to the enclosure. Under the circumstances, with no nacOrnhker, a Standing start, and a big: fieldto pass, Myosotls* performance compares very favourably with Bibbonwood's colonial record of 2.9.

Lady Lybiun, which halls from Ashbnrton, made a runaway race of the Brighton Handicap, being In front all the way, and winning easing up to 4.54. She was followed home by Fusee and Florin, while St. Simon was also close up. The Avon Handicap was responsible for a fine race put up by Bed Child, which was conceding his six opponents up to ISs start. Getting to business much more quickly than Usual, hi had the issue in safe keeping at the end of a mile and a halt, eventually winning comfortably from Cinders in the excellent time of 4.46 2-5.

The threeTmile Windsor Handicap was annexed easily by Walrakau, which was htfndy all through, and covered the distance ln 7.42. Terra Nova was amongst the starters, but gave a poor display, and was pulled up after going two miles. Revenue, which nas improved greatly since going into M. Edwards' Stable, had an easy victory in the Wainone Handicap, leaving the two miles behind In the respectable time of 4.46 a-5. This gelding is a half brother to Myosotls, but is built on entirely different lines. He Is a square galted trotter, and though not endowed with anything like the pace of his illustrious relative, stays much better When competing iv the Advance HandiCleopatra broke a blood vessel ln the head, and for a while was in rather a bad way.

Quite, a number of horses that competed at the meeting were palbably not trying to win and are likely to give much different showings at the metropolitan meeting next

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THE RACING WORLD. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 65, 17 March 1909

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