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THE TEMPERANCE CAUSE.

(To the Editor.) Sir,—Mr John Simpson seems to be aggrieved at the position I took during the late election. Although he undertakes to answer my letter, he does not appear to have read it. I did all I could to prevent the split he complains of, and was willing to submit to a ballot. Mr Simpson seems to be a party man at all costs. I am not. I leave a party that deserts its principles or compromises with iis opponents on moral: issues. Mr Simpson on tKe other hand seems to act on expediency. He has no right to say that, "I demanded to have my own -,vny at all costs," when I for the last three months have done all I could to have the dispute settled by the democratic method of a ballot. The Auckland Crusaders have as much right to nominate candidates as the League. The Crusaders were willing for the party to decide by ballot, the League were not willing. So lot him saddle up the. right horse. Had I run after a ballot decided against mc his imputations would be warranted. To poll 2581 votes, deserted by my own part}', indicates that many other folk have ijuite a different opinion of mc to that held by Mr Simpson, His prophesy that the people of Auckland will never elect mc t.o any office will probably be verified. But even such a fate as that, will net necessarily infer that I deserve it, I

' have been 10 years in the forefront of this movement in this city and have never heard of Mr Simpson till now. 1 Why does he hide his temperance principles in this fashion?—l am, etc, WILLIAM RICHARDSON. (To the Editor.) Sir, —In regard to Mr. Richardson's comments on the above, I must protest against his silly sneers at Mr. Macdermott and the party generally. That gentleman and many others put a good amount of work into the fight, including personal canvassing. Undoubtedly, one of the causes of non-success is due to Mr. Richardson and his coterie of followers. He knows it, too; and his sneers at religion prove him to be a most unsuiitaible person for a public position, especially in regard to moral reform. I would suggest that his record, either in connection with Parliamentary elections and otherwise, does not commend him, or his non-religi-ous opinions. Hard work, I agree, is required, but Mr.. Richardson's methods of hard work are worth comparatively little, as is obvious. For his good work he is to be admired. As 1 am not seeking notoriety, 'but the good of the allow mc to sign myself SEARCHLIGHT. [This correspondence is now closed.— Ed. E.S.]

MR. ROSSER AND HOUSE RENTS, (To the Editor.) Sir, —I am deeply interested in Mr. EosseT's statement to the Hon. Sir Joseph Ward that houses of 1' rooms could not be had at less than 15s. to £1 per week in Auckland. So far I have failed to find a single house of that size in Auckland or suburbs at such a rental. Such mis-statements as this' are no doubt circulated for Hie purpose of inducing the Government to erect tenaaaents and let them, at a loss, so that the taxpayer or country settlers will have to make up the diffeionee —in other words, the other fellow to pay. If Mr. Rosser is so interested in housing the workers, why does he not invest some of his income in cottage property? Then the friendly societies have large sums for investment, and as he is a man of influence and highly thought of by the workers, why does <he not influence these societies to build to suit and so give employment to those who go aTOund in tailor-made suits and howl for work but never do any? Xo doubt the honest, hard-working man knows from experience that it is anything but profitable investment, and declines to risk what he wants to fall back on In old age. I haye good four and five-roomed house* in fiTst-class repair let at 8/6, 9/-, 9/0, 10/----and 11/- per week, and some of my tenants have lived under mc for from five to seventeen years, all honourable, honest, hard-working, industrious people, who pay their way" and don't -flit by moonlight after plundering their landlord, butcher and baker. Those tenants are only paying the same rent to-day as when they took possession, notwithstanding Mr. Rosser's big advances on the houses that can't be located. On the other hand I have had tenants who. after a few weeks' tenancy, have left nice houses in a most filthy, disgusting and disgraceful state —fences, floors, ceilings and stairs pulled up and burned. In some instances it has taken several years' rent to put such houses in propel repair. Some tenants I will guarantee would make a slum of Government House in less than three months. Owing to Mr. Rosser and his friends' hard work in the Arbitration Court everything has so gone up that it costs fully one-third more to build or repair than it did ten years ago. If anyone wants to get vilified, abused, misrepresented and slandered I would advise them to invest in cottage property in Auckland. I myself have been traduced by the gutter press of the city, vilified on the streets of Auckland Sunday after Sunday, because I -have on many occasions turned men out of my houses because of their dirt, drunkenness and imTnorality. —I am, etc., J. H. HANNAN.

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THE TEMPERANCE CAUSE. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 63, 15 March 1909

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