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FROM SELECTION TO CITY.

§M iff STEELE KUDD.

* -:-r^: : ;^jßights Reserved.),

. i&H ACCiDiarr to joe. ' t Xα not know where my memoiy com-M--S T *a»n't very old, however, when fetation for Bella BelfonTs wedding » to onr place, but I was ambitious, and fS fflJojment I couldn't tell you how I 0T ~ , joyed enjoyment; I only know I ."£* grew tired of It. Barely was there .boot *c selection to grow tired of, Tramping the bush after cows; 'tetag' W«ins fires that roared through rtfleat of the day, and scorched the green •«is»'Wd vegetation for yards around; pick- * your ijaj over the frosted earth, in bare tot »t sunrise of a winter's morning, were flj&Mrtenlng pastimes, and set one wondering if We was always to be tie same, auiif it would ever be worth living at all! nut when tie enjoyment came along—ah! Tien w»s the time! All the terrors and tribnlltioni of tie selection vanished, or irere forgotten, and the dull, dead land becsine a bright, laughing land, and the w orW » n> 9 world, a good, grand, glorlou3 old werW- ! caat away the rake on hearing tjut invitation, and threw up my hat, and, w Kn it C*»e down, Jumped on It, and M "id I was going to that wedding. Joe, T jib was affected the same way, jumped too, but not on my hat. He jumped on the m-twaeft teeth of the rake. Then there ets enjoyment! Joe roared like a young

ball, and tried to kick himself free of the

nte. But it was a good rake. It was one ff t bought Mother screamed; Sarah fcitsmed and danced clumsily about, and tramped oa the handle of the rake with her big lest, and Joe came off it.

"Fetch some rag! Oh, dear mc, dear mc! fetch some rag, quick!" mother moaned.

I ran for tie rag. I didn't know where I ,ras going to get any, bnt I ran for it. Into tie iease I dashed, stopped all aflutter, and itirid ncttedly about. I saw only the pafend walls, the gin cases, and the table. Them n> no time to lose. I rushed out •gala.

'.'1 ogn't see any," I shouted. "Where'll I *et it?" "01 dear, oh, dear! the child will bleed to ■Sesth!" mother cried. "Bring something; mythlng at all. Quick! oh my heavens!" I rushed into the house again—and out. I was distracted. I knew Joe would die. "Tnere's none!" I blubbered. ''Oh, my God! bring something," from Bother. Her words were .touching. My jjes rested on something—something ballooning gaily on the clothes line, and which, to mc, teemed capable of supplying a whole tmpital With rag. I dashed for that clothes line with both arms outstretched. , "Not then! not them!" Sarah shrieked, rising np from beside Joe. I stopped and looked at Sarah.

ii ao on with 7' " ehe saia, "have some sense!" and, racing post mc, entered the house herself and returned with yards of Mlipo, It was Just In time. Joe's life was jaT«a. Jittmr a while he lifted himself slowly, «i limped cantlously about Hoth' anxiously watched hit moTements (or r .jag .While. Mother was a good, care-

"Don yon feel toe pain going up your letf< the asked.

' Joe didn't feel any pain much, but, when mother was thoughtful enough to remind Mb, be hadn't the heart to disappoint her. He pliced both hands on the uninjured Hoi bj mistake, and pulled a face that npl*|n«d the tortnre he was silently endurtof.

"Dβ yool" mother repeated with increased Mxlety. "Tell mc!" And she put her iicfl oo his shoulder to Implore an answer. Joe screwed and twlated about some more, betorehc conia epeak. "i b-b-blt,'' he murmured. Then there to fresh alarm. "Oil, good (melons mc!" mother exclaim--44, turning to Sarah, "the pain's going op tie child's leg, and it'll turn to bloodpoisoning. Fetch him in and pnt him on the sofa. Ajid yoor father's not at home litberl Oh, whatever will we do!"

Sarah cross-examined Joe. pern's there, Iβ i«" she said, KBMsrfriic his tbigll.

"X-j-jtm —aon't 'urt mc." Joe groaned. TJien Sarah accidentally made a dis

"Why, that Isn't the leg yonr sore foot l> on," t*e said.

i Mother stated then, and seemed to learn t let

" "Go on, boy," she said, sceptically; "md don't be shamming, yon young scamp.'

■ A conflict of feeling filled the heart of J»e. He was in doubt whether to feel ashamed of himself or to lerile Sarah. He rerlled Sarah.

"Well, lt'e sore enough, anyßow," be cried, "an' 11 y-y-you had it, yer fool, yer Wooltat Uke It"

' s»en Jee went limp and started to sink to the ground.

"0-d-don't —oh my!" Sarah gasped, elutelilng tt Joe as she saw him In the act of making a chair of the still npturned rake. But she was too late. Down Joe Hopped on the rake, and with * yell, tried to get oft it again. But It was a good take. It kept Its teeth in and clung to him like a iljnboard. He tried to turn, but the lon* handle prerented him. Then he snatched tt It like a dug biting at things on Its tall.

"Stud steady, then," Sarah commanded, taking bold of him with one hand and the fake with the other. Joe stood stead;, bat rolled his eyes about and "hlvered. Then Sarah rescued the rake, and even mother laughed.

"JMd yon ever see the likes of it?" I ieard mother say when they went Inside.

'\ind what did you think of the other fellow? (that was mc) Sarah aaked. "Did 7PQ see what he was going to fetch from the line to bandage the foot with 7"

They both laughed again, and, feeling Curious, 1 crept back to the clothes line 'Or enllghtment. Then I laughed. I was looking np at the line lauphfng some more, when the voice of mother rang out through jtke open wlndov: '^Steele!" I stole away and Joined Joe. . . (To be Continued Weekly.)

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FROM SELECTION TO CITY. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 62, 13 March 1909

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