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ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES.

(From Our Special Correspondent.)

LONDON, September 13,

THE NEW DOMINION.

Quaint customs linger long in this land of history and tradition, and the practice of having "Proclamations" recited in the heart of. London by a "Common Cryer" is one of them. This medieval dignitary—he is Lieutenant-Colonel Kearns. in private life—stood on the steps of the Royal Exchange yesterday, and read to the assembled crowd His Majesty's Proclamation declaring that the Colony of New Zealand would, from and after the 27th inst., be called and known as "the Dominion of New Zealand." At tbe closing words, "God Save the King," the crowd gave three cheers for His Majesty. PROFESSIONAL RUGBY. The New Zealand professional Rugby football team, owing to the secrecy which enshrouds. its movements and its personnel, is becoming known in football circles here as "the phantom team." When the "All Blacks" came to England they arrived before the end of August,, but now we are a third of the way through September and there is not yet any news of the professional team having left New Zealand. The Northern Union has not even disclosed the names of the men who are coming. "This secrecy," says Mr. Palliser, the New Zealand Rugby Union representative in London, "may be part 'of tne plan to act as a make-believe to Northern Union supporters- The guaranteed £3000 will be quickly exhausted if the show does not 'catch "on.' . . - Whatever happers to this side which is supposed to be on the high seas, it comes with no sort of credit from the Colony of New Zealand. The Northern Union, in the courage of despair—generated by the inroads made on its domains by prol.ssional Association and by the reviv-ii of the spirit of real Rugby—was bound to make some kind of sensation to save itself. It has met with a severe rebuff in South Wales, where it laid the flattering unctioa tc its soul that its net would include some big fish, instead of the odd minnows of which the Welsh union has rid itself." Mr. Palliser says tuat everything is being done to hoodwint. the public in England, even to the extent of sending home results of matches between tbe side that is coming iind others in Australia. "Anyone can get up a side and call it anything that is desired," he remarks; "you could pick up a side anywhere from the Colonies and endow it with any Colonial name, and this may be what .is being done in the Northern Union case." .Meantime Mr. Palliser has the happy work in hand of aiding in the arrangements ior the visit of a British side to New Zealand next spring. Mr. George H. Harnett, acting on behalf of the English Rugby Union, is organising the trip; but there will be nothing definite to say about the side, beyond the fact that it will go, for some two or three weeks. Apropos of this visit of an English team to New Zealand the "Sportsman" says: "The coming of the New Zealand professional team may alter matters, though it remains to be seen whether tbe All Black side really inclut.es the pick of the New Zealand talent. If it does, then the silence of those who were lauded in Sydney for their loyalty to amateurism is neither praiseworthy nor sportsmanlike." WOOL CONFERENCE. A conference was held in Bradford last Wednesday between a number of Australian and New Zealand wool growers now in this country, London wool brokers, and Bradford wool users, with reference to the question of vegetable matter in wool which has for a long time caused trouble to those engaged in Bradford trade. The colonial and London visitors were taken to various works and shown tbe evils arising from presence of vegetable matter in wool, and it is understood that the outcome of the conference will be the formation of a joint committee of growers, brokers, importers, and users oi wool to consider the best means of overcoming the diffiI culty. THE PALMA TROPHY. The defeat of the British and colonial teams by the- representatives of the United States in the Palma Trophy matcli last Saturday, is not to be explained away on any hypothesis except the obvious one that the best men have won. So far as the Mother Country team is concerned, it takes a very poor place indeed, at the bottom of the list, being 73 points on the aggregate score behind Australia, 91 less than Canada, and no fewer than 132 below tbe winners. Moreover, the shooting of the Americans easily constitutes a world's record for any rifle contest under similar conditions. It even beats -any match rifle shooting of which authorised figures exist. In the Palma the teams are eight aside. Each man fires fifteen rounds at SOO, 900, and 1000 yards, and the rifles used must be of strict service -pattern. At Bisley there is no service rifle shooting with eight men a-side firing the like number of rounds at these distances, though we have available for comparison the International contest for the Elcho Shield, in which "any" rifle may he used. Yet the Elcho pales its fires before the shooting at Ottawa, where the United States riflemen scored no fewer than 1712 points out of a possible. 1800, The record for the ¥.lcho is held by Scotland, which in 1592 compiled an aggregate of 1696 — sixteen ponits less that the Americans made. No finer feats of marksmanship have been accomplished than those of Windser and Bryant, who for the United States team each scored 219 points out of a possible 225. According to cable messages received in London, the Palma match, which is popularly regarded as emblematic of the military rifle championship of the world, ■was decided under almost ideal atmospheric conditions. The Americans having gained a lead of 40 points over the Australians as the result of tbe shooting afc 800 and 900 yards,- the competition resolved itself into a struggle for the second place, when, after luncheon, the shooting was resumed at the 1000 yards

rangeSefe the-Canadians shot so well that th\sy not. only, took the second/position from the Australians, bat established a world's record at that distance both for the team and for an individual score.' ■" ■' " •• • ■ ■'■' • THE TENNIS 7 CHAMPION.. - " Anthony Wilding has not let' much grass grow under his feet ere taking bis revenge on the new German champion, Otto Froitzhwm, who so decisively cut the- peripatetic New Zealander's comb at Homburg less than a fortnight ago. Wilding met his Homburg conquerer in the open singles at Baden Baden, wherein, he showed marked improvement on the form he exhibited in the former tournament. He won four rounds with the loss of only eleven games; and defeated Wilmann, one of the best German- players, without tbe loss of a game; Froitzheim had matters less his own way. In the third round he had to work hard to defeat Wallis Myers 6 —4, 6—4, and in the semi-final he was all but vanquished by Oskar Kreuzer, the latter being a set up and 5—4 in the second. Rallying, however, very credita °ly, the Strasburg man captured the second set at 7—5, and the third at 6—2.- The final was a comparatively one-sided match. Froitzheim was many degrees below bis Homburg standard, and Wilding in a vigorous, aggressive mood. The New Zealander won a short and sharp match by 6—2, 6 —3, 6—2. In the open doubles, Wilding partnered Wallis Myers, and the couple were expected to meet Froitzheim and Kreuzer in the final. The latter pair, however, were defeated in the semi-final, and in the final round Wilding and Myers had a comparatively easy task, and they won in three straight sets.

Mrs D. K. Hole, of Queen's Club, won the ladies' open singles, and, with Wilding, annexed the mixed doubles.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19071021.2.18

Bibliographic details

ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 251, 21 October 1907

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ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 251, 21 October 1907

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