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DERBY FAVOURITE'S DOWNFALL.

The Derby of 190 i will be memorable for the defeat of one of the warmest favourites of recent years, and for the fact that for the first time in the history of ! the race a horse trained in Ireland secured premier honours. Irish-bred horses in - plenty have, won the Derby, but never till this year of grace has the "blue riband" fallen to an animal bred and trained in . the distressful country. \ The Derby is not what it was either as 1 a "cockney carnival" or a '■carnival of | rascality." There are none of those hilaroS and amusing scenes on the road to Epsom, whereon writers of even a score of years ago were wont to dwell. Most of us go down by train nowadays, and those who take the road no longer patronise the coach, the four-in-hand, "sharrybang," or the humble moke-drawn costermonger's barrow. White toppers, blue veils, pea-shooters and bags of flour no longer play a leading part in the progress of those who go by road to Epsom. Motors, motor-busses and "taxicabs" have almost superseded all other classes of vehicle on the road, and there is no "fun" en route worth the name. Even the scene on the hill overlooking the course is changed. The old English fair element has been abolished and now only ; the innocent cocoanut shies remain to rc- | mind one of the old time uproar when there was "all the fun of the fair" on the j hill.

For the great race, r which was worth £6450, a mean field of nine animals mustered at the post. Of these, the. favourite

was Captain Greer's colt Slieve Gallion, a son of Gallinule and Reclusion, which had won the Two Thousand Guineas in good style.

13 to 8 was freely laid on Captain Greer's colt, whilst against his MiddlePark Plate conqueror, Galvani, odds of 7 to 1 were always available. Lord Rosebery's Bezonian was fairly well supported at nines, whilst against Mr R. Croker's Orby (Ormc —Rhoda B.), and Colonel Baird's Woolwinder (Martagon—• St. Windeline). 100 to 9 was on offer. ! For the rest you could get forties about Earlston, fifties against All Black and [Galleot. and any price you liked against Ijohn Bull.

An admirable start was effected, and running at a slowish pace the rank outsider led the field for a couple of furlongs. Then Higgs sent the favourite to the front, and the pace soon became too hot for John Bull, who retired to the rear. Nearing Tattenham Corner, Slieve Gallion was a clear two lengths ahead of his field, and looked as though he would come home alone. The moment, however, the star-gazing son of Gallinulc began to come down the hill he began to sprawl and a change came o'er the scene. Orby raced up alongside the favourite, and Bezonian followed suit. Still Slieve Gallion managed to keep his head in front until he went a little wide at the bend. Then Orby went to the head of i affairs, and from that point held the favourite safe, and had the race in hand. Half way up the straight Woolwinder, after looking hopelessly out of it, came through with a tremendous burst of speed and so rapidly overhauled the leaders that he seemed to have a chance of winning. He fairly ran Slieve Gallion out of second place, but the effort of making up so much ground left Woolwinder un- ' able to seriously challenge Orby. which won by a couple of lengths, with the favourite beaten half a length for second place. Bezonian was fourth. The time of the race was 2min 44secs, which compares badly with Spearmint's i record of 2min 36 4-ssecs made last year. [Yet slow as the race was run there was ] hardly one of the horses engaged that j was not all out. at the finish, the favour- | ite being perhaps more completely spun lout than any of his opponents.

The victory of Orby was received in dead silence for a minute, but when the cheering did commence it was hearty enough. Sir Croker was, no doubt, highly gratified with his victory, but whatever his emotions you could not guess at them from any facial indications. As he led in his first Derby winner his face was as expres_i_nless as an oyster's shell.

Orby, which was bred by Mr Croker, ran twice as a two-year-old in Ireland without gaining brackets. This year Orby won the Earl of Sefton's Plate, Liverpool Spring, and on May 20 he appropriated the Baldoyl Plate. Orby is engaged in the St. Leger.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19070720.2.72.3

Bibliographic details

DERBY FAVOURITE'S DOWNFALL., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 172, 20 July 1907

Word Count
766

DERBY FAVOURITE'S DOWNFALL. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 172, 20 July 1907

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