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AUCKLAND ART SOCIETY.

.The Auckland Art Society's gallery is still oipen to the general public 'wishing ±o view this year's collection of pictures. •Afternoon tea was dispensed by the lady members to-day, and. musical selections were given.

j It is pleasant to see that Mrs E. M. Walrond, encouraged by her success last year, when a very large proportion of her exhibited works sold, is again, represented by a. number of pictures which show she has still further advanced in craftsmanship during the past twelve months. "Gathering JHpies" is a pleasant little sketch between the sand dunes and the sea-lapped shore, where, as the title indicates, Maoris are engaged in collecting those toothsome —but to a European digestion abominably indigestible, molluscs. The composition falls nicely together, and a green opalescent sunset sky is very cleverly treated. "Autumn" is another taking little picture, but, better still, is "The Head of Lake Tc Anau," a picture rich in colouring, showing the mountains which surround the lake bathed in all the unnamable glories of a summer sunset. For technical excellence, and evidence of advance in this part of the art of painting, No. 48, "Between Whangaroa and Kaeo," is probably the best thing Mrs Walrond shows. One cannot help regretting, by the way, that in her new love for landscape Mrs Walrond should so entirely have given the slipper to flower painting, in which she showed so much promise, and in which she has so frequently charmed "us.

It is with very sincere pleasure that Miss Bessie Blomfield is hereby complimented on two of the finest flower paintings from the brush of this artist the writer remembers to have seen. The most difficult subject, and the one into which every atom of technical skill Miss Blomfield possesses has been lavished, is- unquestionably "Springtime," a -wealth of clematis and yellow kowhai painted amidst their natural surroundings in the native bush. It is an almost amazing piece of work, but whether the choice of the bush as a background, with flowers life-size in the foreground, is a success, is rather a debatable point. In technique, the picture is wonderful, but perhaps on the whole it is more wonderful than beautiful, which is not, one presumes, either the object of the picture or the intention of the artist. ''Xove's Offering," while showing almost equal technical skill, is altogether and supremely beautiful; therefore, as the poet tells us, "a. joy for ever" to the happy person into whose hands it may fall. The pure white roses are handledled with extraordinary delicacy and skill, and the artistic contrast with the rich blood-red blooms with, which they are mixed is as striking as it is artistic A really notable and charming work of art. "Roses," by the same artist, is adso a very beautiful little canvas.

Another flower painter who has done remarkably well is Miss E. M. Baker, and but for the ia-ct that Miss Blomfield has chosen more difficult subjects, one should bracket these two ladies equal— for indeed Miss Bakers "Cactus Dahlias" is one of the most excellent flower studies we remember to have seen in Auckland. The artist has revelled with positive delight in the vivid tints of the gorgeous queen of autumn flowers, and she communicates her delight to all who look-upon her picture. ■ ''Cherries" l is also an able little study, though, not on the same plane with the more important canvas named. "Comrades" is by a very long way the beat thing Mrs Mary Morton Masters has done for some seasons. It is a good, strong, assured work, and it always has been in horses' beads that this exceedingly clever painter of animab has most conspicuously succeeded. We axe glad, too, to ccc Mrs Masters returning to what one maj term the picture side of animal paintir.". as contrasted with the portrait. Paintings of polo ponies, though no doubt involving equal technical skill, are not lo be compared in public interest or artistic value with such pictures as "Comrades," which though it tells no story, is yet rull of suggestion to the averagely imaginative mind.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19070504.2.8

Bibliographic details

AUCKLAND ART SOCIETY., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 106, 4 May 1907

Word Count
683

AUCKLAND ART SOCIETY. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 106, 4 May 1907

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