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ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES.

PERSONAL AND GENERAL.

(From Our Special Conesponaont.)

GrossG. Mr. Burry came Home last May, travelling as far as Genoa by the s.s. j Bremen, and reaching London by the overland route on May 21st. Since then he has travelled extensively through Fiance, Germany, Switzerland and BelIgium in the interests of his firm, Messrs. jG. W. Bennett and Co., and has spent a holiday with his sister in Ireland.

LONDON, September 7. Mr. E. Greer, of Auckland, has arrived in England on n visit to his father, who is 86 years of age. Mr. Greer left Wellington by the Tongariro, but had to broak his journey at Monte Video on account of ill-health. After a rest of three weeks he joined the Turakina, and reached Lqndon on August 15th. and is now staring with his father at Brighton. Mr. Greer's future movements are as yet undecided. He may stay for a few months I and send for his family, and. on the ' other hand, he may return to the colony at once by the San Francisco route.

Mi?s B. Pullen Buvry will accompany her brother to New Zealand in November, her intention being to undertake a lecturing tour in the colony. Miss Burry a member of tho British Association nnd the Anthropological Institute, and is the author of several book?, notably "Jamaica as It Is." She will probably lecture on South Africa and other colonial subjects, and her tour will commence fit Christchurch. in view of the Exhibition opening there in November. After leaving Xew Zealand Miss Burry intends to lecture in Australia, India, China, Japan and Canada. She i& re-visiting New Zealand after an absence of thirteen years.

Mr. Ernest P. Hargrcaves, who formerly belonged to Auckland, is on a. brief business visit to London. For the par-t live years Mr. Hargreaves has beeji engaged in mining in Western Australia, and he expecis to return thither in abcut three weeks' Lime.

Mr. J. G. Coates, of Auckland, wlio is on a holiday trip round the world, has been spending the summer in Great Britain. He travelled hither via the United Btate? and Canada., visiting the principal cities en route. Mr. Coates leaves on his return to the colony about the middle of 2*oveinber, travelling via the Continent and Suez.

Mr. Arthur L. Edwards, the. Auckland tenor, has left the ranks of the concert singers to take up the position of assist-ant-manager at the Oxford,, one of London's leading muse-halls.

Mr. W. Lyons, leader of the! New Zealand bowlers, now in this country, returned to London a few days ago after a brief but very enjoyable tour in Scotland and Ireland. He hopes to have his rink reconstituted in time to play the first match of the little campaign in the course of the next few daVs. Mr. Or. Butts, who will fill one of the two vacancies in the team caused by the return of Messrs W. 11. Mercer and G. Tutt. was for some time hon. secretary of the Xew Zealand Bowling Association. Though over seventy he is a keen and active bowler. The other player will probably be. Mr. J. Hcvrsburgh,' a past president of the N.Z.8.A., who with Mr. Lyons engaged Councillor Percy Whellock, president of the Bounds Green 8.C., and Mr. R. Prideau?: in a pairs match at Bowes Park. North London, yesterday.

The New Zealanders opened the scoring, and stood 10 to 0 at the opening of tho seventh end. Then Whellock. by a brilliant drive, scored six, but in the? end the Maorilanders won by 22 points to 14.

Mr. A. F. Wilding played with conspicuous success at the recent international lawn tennis tournament at Marienbad. He won both the men's open events, beating in of each C. Froitzheim ■who is at present undoubtedly the best singles player in Austria or Germany. At their first meeting Wilding beat Froitzheim by 3 sets to 2 at 7—5, 6—o, »'—3, and at the next time of asking vanquished the German by the same set margin at 6—2, o—l, the >7ew Zealanders superior steadiness and condition being the grreta factors in his victories. Bracketed with C. Yon Tv'esgeley, Wilding shared the men's doubles, and in partnership with Miss Slsie Lane won the mixed double?.

The R.M.S. Turakinn. of the N.Z. Shipping Company's fleet. leaves Plymouth tomorrow for Xew Zealand, via Capetown and Hobart, with the following passengers:—Mr. F. H. Bailey. Mr. and Mrs. T. Bassett and the Misses JSassctfc (2), Lieut. R. 0. Chesney, Mr. <;. A. Clark. Miss A. Dennis. Mr. .). B. Elvidge, Mr?. F. C. .Munro. Mr. D. 'Munro. Mr. P. Munro, Mr. E. L. Trower, :Mr. A. S. Tiower. >liss C. M. Wheelev. :.Ir. B. B. Wood. Miss Wood. Mr. F. C. Baiues. Mr. O. Butcher. Mr. >T. Ca,'mpbell. Mr. J. Christopher, Miss S. J. W. Crajip. Rev. P. C. and Mrs. Durward and •family. Mr. J. E. Foster. Mr. W. A. Godlonton. Mr. E. Hall. Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Hanson ana sons. Miss W. V. Invin, Mr. H. C. Kineh, Mr. J. Knox, ?Ar. and .Mrs. G. Living, son and daughter. Miss M. Matthews, Mr. F. X. Moran, Mr. U. Mx. J. T. Millingtou. Mr. W. L. Mitchell, Mr. F. Powell-Jones. Mr. H. Read, Mr. and Mrs. Reed. Mr. A. D. Ejley, 3lr. E. Rissel, Mr. W. F. Rush, Mrs. !?. Sendall, Miss E. fihillite, Miss M. Shepherd, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Smith, Mr. A. W. Staite, Miss X. Stewart, Dr. and Mrs. T. Valintine, Miss Valintine, Mrs. M. A. Veillard, Mr. Wcston, Miss JR. White.. Mr. C. F. M. Wrou-hton, and a large number in the 3rd class.

Recent callers at the High Commissioner's office:—Dr. J. Ewart (Wellington), Mr. E. P. Hrargreaves (Auckland], "Mr. R. E. Barkr-r (Canterbury), Miss T. Fraser (Wellington), Mr. H. J. D. IVlahon (Auckland), Mr. and Sirs. Andrew Wylie and Miss Wylie (Wellington). Mr. and Mrs. T. Philoox (Auckland), Mr. A. M. Dalrymple aud [Mr. J. M. Dalrymple (Puerua). Mr. J. K. Johnson (Auckland), Mr. S. McWUliame (Wellington). Mr. and Mrs. Joshua H. Zggers (Wellington), Miss A. Barnet,t (JOnnedin). Mr. H. W. Perynian (Christchurch), Mr. Chas. Haines (Wellington),, Mr. J. Warsaw (Dunedin), Mr. Robert Greer (Auckland), "Mr. J. H. Melton (Wellington), Mrs. S. Clifford (TUarlborough), Mr. H. Pullen Buny (APickland), Mr. J. P. Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fcnwick (Auckland), M.v. G. C. B. Mickle (Wellington).

Lieut;. E. B. Mickle, of the Royal New Zealand Artillery, and Mrs. Mi'ckle arrived by the Athenic last week after a eplendicl voyage, and are now in London lor a week or two of sightseeing- They ]«v.c on the 14th inst. for Ripon, York?, to spend a fortnight with Lieut. Miekle's relatives there. On his return south in pciober Lieutenant Mickle will make a start with his artillery course of instruction, which is the main object of his visit to England. He commences with the theoretical course at the Royal Artillery Academy, at Woolwich, and will remain there till ChristniaF, after which hr goes to Shoeburynoss for the practical portion of the course. After three or four months at Shoeburyness he will go to Hythe t 0 receive a course of training in field artillery, and afterwards he -will probably be attached to some garrison artillery company for experience in garrison work and administration generally. Lieut. Mickle expects to be in fngland about 18 months or a little jmk during the first twelve months, but ton es S tn subs equent vacantion he

l^nesfvElt^ who ?M been on a England for t>, E l uro P e ' entente leaving ~ Wie German liner Erederieh cler

Mr. James Aiken has returned to London again from an enjoyable tour in Scotland. He leave* for Wanganui next Friday, travc/lmg as far as Sydney by the P. and 0. liner Mooltan.

The appointment of the Berlin banker Herr Dernburg as head of the German Colonial Office is a novel experiment, and one which will be watched with keen interest, in Australasia. In Germany the appointment seems to have caused quite a sensation, and among those who have assisted in the maladministration of the German colonies something like consternation prevails. For Herr Dernbiu-g is a self-made man, well-known for .bis summary methods and thoroughness, and the "tribe of incompetent bureaurrats who have been responsible for the irregularities which have made Germany's colonies; such expensive luxuries in the past fear that the new broom will make a clean sweep of them. Herr Dernburg's appointment, is said tn have been made on the initiative of the Emperor, who hns coma to share the views of business and Liberal circles in Germany that the eolonie?, if they are to pay, must be managed on business lines.

Herr Dernburg is a roan of business purely, and though credited with ambitions to shine in the political arena he has hitherto made no attempt to enter it. He began life as a clerk in a factory in Berlin, and then went to the United

States, where he was engaged some years iv a banking house. Ho returned to Berlin, and in a few years he climbed from a comparatively humble situation to be director of a leading bank, and seats on the directorates of numcrou.flourishing commercial concerns. His speciality"is the regulation a.nd unravelling of tangled financial undertakings — in fact, Herr Dornburg is regarded as a sort of financial genius in Berlin. His acceptance of the post now offered him is regarded as a proof of hir; public spirit and "disinterestedness. His income from his various companies cannot be much less than £20.000. His salary at the Colonial Office will be o-nly £750.

Herr Dernburg is a vastly different person to the. amiable well-intentioned aristocrat, Prince Hofrenloe Langenburg, who preceded him. That worthy was entirely unfitted to deal with the corruption and chaos of the German Colonial Office, and the change from the easy-going, tape-riddeu Prince to the "hustling"' banker is expected to produce wonders in the way of reforms. Herr Dernburg'p, task will be no easy one. To overcome the bad effects of ten years of disgraceful maladministration and waste ;.nust take a long time, and Herr Dernburg is not likely to receive much help ivoni his subordinates either in Berlin or in the colonies themselves.

Mr. Franklin Richardson Kendall, who is retiring from the managership of the P. and O. Company, is a member of an old Cornish family—the Kendalls of Pelyn. His mother was a niece of the late Sir John Franklin, the Arctic navigator, with whom his father at one time served as a lieutenant. Mr. Kenda.il is retiring on account of failing health, after serving the P. and O. Company for nearly fifty-one years, having joined Die London office towards the closi' of 1855. After a little over two years' seryiee there. Mr. Kendall was sent out to Bombay, which was then, as now, the most important of the Company's Eastern agencies. After serving at different stations iv the East, he was in 1566 elected to take charge of the company's agency in Melbourne, and remained as their principal representative in Australia for about 14 years In 18S0 ; he was invited to join the managements of the company at headquarters, and in 1890 became senior general manager.

Mr. J. T. Noble Anderson, M.1.0.E., formerly of Duuedin and now attached to the Melbourne University, is at present on a visit to England, and will remain for some months. Mrs. Anderson accompanies him.

Sir John Leng, the veteran newspaper proprietor and publisher, left Liverpool last Friday on a tour which will iuclude Western Canada. Southern California, New Zealand, Australia and Japan. Lady and Miss Long are accompanying him. Despite his 78 years, Sir John Leng is an enthusiastic traveller. Of recent years he has travelled extensively in Canada, United States, Europe, Egypt, and India.

The Otago Acclimatisation Society have forwarded to England a quantity of ova from the native trout, and many of the eggs have since hatched out at Lord Denbigh's fisheries and the Blagdon Hatchery, Somerset. The consignment, which was sent by Mr. R. B. Marston. numbered about 12,000, half of them being taken from the parent brown trout, weighing 15 lb., and the other half from Lochlevens, scaling 7 to 10 lb. Should the trout flourish it is hoped that a number will be placed in the Thames, from which river their gTeat-graud fathers and great-grandmo-thers originally hailed.

Lieutenant R. O.- Chesney, who has been in England for artillery instruction, is returning to the colony by the "Turakina."' which leaves Plymouth tomorrow for Capetown, Hobart, and New Zealand.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 241, 16 October 1906

Word Count
2,091

ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 241, 16 October 1906

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