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PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON.

L _ (From Our Sgedai correspondents tl- ; IX>NDON, July 21. ' The King has been compelled, regretfully to decline the invitation to visit Canada. It would be difficult to resist tie pressure to extend the visit from one part of the Dominion to another, and the trip would doubtless thus involve a. long and arduous programme. Having visited Canada, moreover, it -would be no less difficult for the King to decline an invitation to tdsit. say India or Australasia. For the preeent, at any rate, his duties require that the Sovereign should remain within easy reach, of the centre of the Empire. Says Lord Elgin on His Majesty's behalf: — ""The current business of the Empire ■which, is continuous and incesant, imposes a heavy tax on the time and strength of its Sovereign, and it is well imown that the absence of His Majesty irom this country for any length of ltime is difficult' if not impossible, except tinder very definite limitations and restrictions, even when considerations of liealth" and the need for comparative jrest render it expedient."' It is added that His Majesty desires Jaat it should be made known to all *that he is prevented by the necessities lof his position, and not by any lack of appreciation of the loyalty and" devotion •of the people of Canada to his throne and person/ The latter portion of the message holds out a slight hope that possibly on. some future occasion the gresent difficulties may be overcome.

The colonial delega,tes to last week's Congress of the Chambers of Commerce af the Empire had arranged, a striking tribute to Mr Chamberlain as a final ieolonial touch to the Chamberlain dejnonstrations of last week. A joint committee of Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and South African delegates lad planned a luncheon for Safcurdav in Sir Chamberlain's honour, and the rieht hon. zentleman was to speuk in reply upon certain important colonial aspects of the movement for Imperial reciprocity in trade. Unfortunately, at the last moment the luncheon had to abandoned owing to Mr Chamberlain being seized with an attack of grmt. As the delegates are now dispersed throughout Europe, it would not be possible to get together again a representative gathering.

For the post of art master at Wellington Technical School the High Commissioner has selected Mr G. Ross PitkethIy, A.R.C.A. (London), who for the past sis years has been second master at the Leicester Municipal School of Art. Mr PiTkethly is 30 years of age. and unmarried. He received his art training principally at the Royal College of Ails, where he spent live years, and won the College sold medal and first travelling scholarship. He has gained eight silver medals, 13 bronze meduls. and 11 book prizes in. the National competitions of Schools of Art, and eight Queen's prizes Tor special excellence in examinations, itr Pitkethly has had experience in designing and carrying out ceilings and freizes in decorative plaster work, wood and stone carving, cast bronze tablets and memorials, sundials, metal work and jewellery in gold. 3ilver and copper, enamelling, engraving, illuminated addresses, and other branches of applied art. His students have gained ~ s<7 aiiiofarsttips: — fJtffree- ' studentships, three gold medals. 11 silver and 35 bronze medals, 54 book prizes and 24 King's prizes. His credentials are excellent. Mr B. J. Fletcher, headmaster of the Leicester Art School, describes his assistant as "in. every way a loyal and reliable assistant and a painstaking, careful, patient and tactful teacher." Mr Walter Crane, the well-known artist, also speaks highly of Mr Pitkethly'3 -work. The new art master will leave London £or Xew Zealand by the lonic, sailimr on Jiugust 23.

Master [Francis Hutehens., the little Taranaki pianist, who holds a scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music, took part in a pianaforte recital given ithis.week at the Beehstein Hall by some of the Royal Academy prizewinners who ere pupils of Mr Tobias Matahay. and are still members of his class. Master •Eutchena played the variations of. Chopin numbered op. 12. and also York [Bowen"s "Miniature Suitee." The •"Times" notes that the young performer Bhowed fluency, neatness, and pareful attention to detail. Of his rendering of the "Miniature Suite" the says,;—" The details were carefully brought out —perhaps a little too carefully sometimes to allow of much spontaneity making itself felt; still, that is better when you are at the early stages of pianoforte playing than scrambling through a piece and making 'temperament' responsible for an incapacity for accuracy."

E. W. Hillsdon Hutton, representative and professor of the National College of Music for New Zealand, has been staying in London for the purpose of studying the system on which the TjOti3on Colleges of music are conducted. On his return to New Zealand lie will conitinue the work begun there before leaving <rf forming branch colleges connected imth the National College of Music, London. The parent college has been forStonate lately in obtaining patronage of S&e Duke of Norfolk, the Duke of Rutland, Canon Barker. Canon Barnet. and &c Countess of Warwick. Good work &as been done amonjr the church organists and choirmasters by holding examinations. The Roman Catholic Church 'jhae patronised the Guild of St. Cecilia's ''(another department of the N.C.M.) exvSHninarions in church music. The secretary of the college. Mr W. J. Ross, has invented a very interesting kinder- ' garten system for teaching theory and pianoforte playing to young children, ,and the N.Z. "representative is taking this system with him to the colony. A local " committee connected with, the branch colle-re at Whangarei, Auckland, have imiraTed him to flirect the college ihere. ""

i Mr P. S. Cousins, of Auckland, who ias spent the lust two years dJiiefly in 'the United States in the automobile •business, is in England on a visit of a ■few weeks' duration, sightseeing and pNting friends. From here Mr Cousins goes to Paris to settle there for some time, and study French methods of auto■Siobile construction.

; The famous Besses o' tlr Barn Brass •Band made their last public appearance «1 this country this week at Farnworth, Prior to their tour round the world. $hey h a< i a hearty send off. The band, ; apioogst other engagements, is to play • •* 2few Zealand, and will, it is stated, j«*ive £2500 from ike Ngw. Zealand

Mr J. Q. Hutchinson., after 35 years* absence in New Zealand, is revisiting his native town of Hull. Mr Hutchinaon left Yorkshire in the early "seventies" with a £10 note in Ms pocket. "Since then/ he declared to a local interviewer, not without some pride, "I have never waa-ted for a day's work." "And how many acres do you now own,?"' he was asked. "Eight hundred and fifty acres of freehold land, and every bit cultivated,"' was the cheery reply. " And you will be glad to go "back?" ' c Oh yes, I shall be glad to go back to New Zealand. It is one of the most prosperous of the British Colonies."' Mr Hutchinson is only making a three months' stay in this country.

Mr Birch, a leading sheep fanner in New Zealand, was present at the annual meeting of sheepbreeders held at Derby on the second day of the Royal Agricultural Show. In the course'of a discussion. Mr Birch said 'it was incredible to him that some drastic measures had not been taken in this country to eradicate sheep fica-b» Absolute compulsory dipping was what -was required. In two years, he added, that had entirely cleared the -whole of New Zealand of the disease, and certainly that was a much more, difficult country to deal with than thia.

Among Lhe rompetitor-visitors to the Shrewsbury Lawn Tennis Tournament tliis week were the New Zealanders Mr A. F. Wilding and Mr F. Wilding. They did not come "empty away." -'A. F." won the Gentlemen* Singles Challenge Cup, defeating,, the holder, E. R. Allen, ■in the final, and with his brother as paxtner won the Gentlemen's Doubles Handicap. -'A. F. " partnered by Miss Pinckney. also ran through the Mixed Doubles Handicap, and divided the prize with Mr H. Chiswell and Mrs Hawker, time preventing a, definite issue bein" , arrived at. °

Mr Charles Eawlinson arrived from Auckland last week on a. business visit to London. Mr Kawlinson travelled fxotn Sydney by the P. and O. liner Mongolia.

Mr S. Kahn, of Auckland, arrived in London last week, having come as far as Genoa by. the German liner Darmstadt, and thence overland to Paris. Mr Kahn leaves in a week or two for Germany on a, visit of business and pleasure combined, and he hopes to sail far New Zealand in October.

The •'Standard" in a leading article deprecates the proposed concessions reported to have been promised to President Roosevelt by Sir Joseph Ward in the direction of freeing American tinned salmon and printing paper in return for America j.eeording similar treatment to New Zealand wool and kauri gum. '-Ft happens," .said the "Standard." "that in regard to both these commodities (salmon and paper) a preference was conceded to Canada in 1003. Such a bargain as i-ir Joseph is said to be contemplating would, so far as one could see. be inconsistent with the previous engagement of the colony: and we are therefore inclined to hope that there has been some misunderstanding of the Premier's intentions." The '"Standard" even suggests that during his absence from the colony Sir Joseph Ward may have fallen out of touch with the feeling of his countrymen.

Colonel Kitchener, who has just returned from his visit to New Zealand, writes, to the '"Standard" in support of the views on -modified! conscription which he advocated while in the colony. "If we are to remain a nation at all," he says. a we are bound sooner or later to adopt some plan of modified service. God grant we may adopt it befoi'e it is too late. . - . Our present army is useless in case of national emergency. Let. us gradually do away with it. and replace it with trained citizens."

Mr and Mrs T. W. Butcher, or Wellington, arrived by the Federal line "Dorset" last Saturday after a very pleasant trip. Mr Butcher is visiting London on business connected with the installation of gas works in New Zealand, and during his four months' stay in this country he will visit various manufacturing centres. On the conclusion of business Mr Butcher and his wife will do some sight-seeing on the. Conti-

nent. Mr Butcher attended the Newmarket races, anils cannot see that the larger colonial racing clubs have anything to learn from this famous course in the matter of grandstand accommodation and appointments. "'The course itself," he said, "is rather pretty., but it would never satisfy colonials to be able to see only the finish of a mile and a half or two mile race."

A" party of New Zealand bowlers composed of Messrs G. Tutt. W. H. Mercer and W. Lyons, all of Auckland, assisted by *Mr S. . Forteseue, who is well known to colonial bowlers, paid a visit to the South London Club's green last Tuesday and encountered a strong four skipped by the old internationalist Mr J. Biyant. Ilie visitors played up well in tbe first half, but were overplayed in the second and had to acknowledge defeat by 25 points to 10. A return match was played on Thursday, when the veteran New Zealander.. Mr J. Butt, took Mr Fortescue's place. Playing a great game the visitors stood at 13 to love at the end of the first half, but in the second they could only add five points, while their opponents gathered in 21 and pulled the match out of the fire by three shots. The game was very exciting towards the finish, the scores being IS all when the tyro last ends only were left to be played. Mr Lyons skipped the New Zealanders in both matches.

Miss Irene Ainsley, the New Zealand contralto, has been honoured with a summons from the Prince and Princess of Wales to appear at Marlborough House on July 25th and sing before His Majesty the King. This is an exceptionally high honour for a vocalist who has just made her debut.

Mr. H. Smales. of Auckland;, arrived on the oth inst., after a pleasant voyage via Sydney. Melbourne and the Cape. He is now on a visit to relatives in Sussex, and -will afterwards visit Cornwall and various places in England and on the Continent, returning to New Zealand via Suez in December. Mr. Smales is anxious to see as much as possible of the agricultural districts during his stay in England.

Mr. Philip T. Kenway. of Gisborne, who arrived by the lonic a week or two ago, will probably stay four months in this country. Mr. Kenway has bought a motor-car, and intends to spend' most of his time in touring through Ensland and Scotland.

Miss Grace Sharland, eldest daughter of Mir. Chas. Sharland, of London, was presented at Court on Jane Ist by Lady McGregor. Miss Sharland wji§ born at

Mt. W. J. Napier was entertained to luncheon on July 11th by the Headmaster of Eaton and Mrs. Lyttelton. and was subsequently shown over the schools, chapel, library and grounds of the historic educational institution. He was delighted with all he saw, and inspected with great interest the rudely carved names on desks and walla inscribed by boys who attained greatness, such as Gladstone, Byron, Shelley, "Walpole, Pitt, and many ! sbthers.

Miss P. Morton Jones, of Wanganui, has arrived in London, and is making her headquarters at a ladies' club in South Kensington. She came via Suez and the Continent, landing at Genoa in May last, and travelling in Italy with Mrs. Stannus Jones, formerly of Auckland, and now living a.t Nice. Miss Morton Jones spent a month at Nice, and tnen came on to London. She is here on a pleasure trip, and will spend Christmas in England. Her present intention is to return to New Zealand some time nert year by way of Vancouver.

Recent callers at the High Commissioner's Office.-—Mrs. A. E. Dunn (Christchurch). Mr. and Mrs. E. Watts (Christchureh), Hγ. and Mrs. H. F. Christie and Dr. H. H. Christie (Wanganui). Dr. W. A. Chappie and Mrs. Chappie (Wellington), Mr. J. T. Millington (Wellington), Mr. •T- R. Johnston and Mies Johnston (Cheltenham). Mr. T. Kahn (Auckland).. Mr. Christian Leigh (Hokitika), Rev. and Mrs.. H. ff. York (Reefton). Mr. Wm. Lyons (Auckland), Miss L. K. Tolmine (Dunedin). Mr. Esmond H. Esdaile (Wellington). Mr. Jas. E. Fulton (Wellington). Misa A. Perkins and Mrs. W. H. Perkins (Grevmouth, Mr. S. A. Shaw (Waihi). Mr." and Mrs. T. W. ButeheT (Wellington), Miss H. M. Corfe (Christchurch), Mr. Victor E. Moore (Christehurch). Mr. Jas. Thomson (Wellington), Mr. Wm. Earnshaw (Dunedin), Mr. T. Fawcett Rowe (Cambridge). Mr. E. C. .Studholnie (Waimate), Mr. F. J. C4ibbs (Auckland), Mr. Norton Francis (Waimate), Mr. Philip Keaway (Gisborne), Mis 3 Beatrice. Carrigan (Nelson), Mr. Cico. Felton (Wellington). Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Muhdel (Wellington). Mr. and Mrs. fcf. P. Smithson (Tiinam). t

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Bibliographic details

PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 204, 27 August 1906

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PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 204, 27 August 1906

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