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......THIS ..... Racing World

9r

It Is mentioned in an English exchange that Finasseur, the property of SI. Michel Epbrussi, the dual winner of the French Durby and Grand Prix, is the biggest winner in France with £28,319; Val dOr, thanks to the Eclipse Stakes, follows with £15,644; Genial and Gouvernant, In ths same stable as Val dOr, come nest with £12,424 and £11,623 respectively. Clyde, the Oaks winner, nets £9420; Macdonald 11., with the Prix dv Consiel Municipal, claims £7034; Rataplan, the winner of the Grand Prix de Vichy, secures , £6273. Prestige, the crack two year old, has won £6036 for M. Vanderbilt; Brienne, £5264; the unfortunate Jardy, £4806; and Presto 11., the conqueror of Pretty Polly, £4276.

Notwithstanding many disappointments, through an epidemic in the stable. M. Blanc, for the third year in succession, beads the list of winning owners in France with over £60,000 to his credit. Last year bis horses won him £65,000, and brought him within measurable distance of the Duke of Portland £T3,858. In 1903 M thane's horses won £45,000, which is also a record score for France, and uls winnings in three seasons amount to £170.000, this representing but a part of the profits, as he has the stud fes of Flying Fox and other stallions, whilst he sold two of his aorses recently for something like-£32,000. M. Blanc's principal winners were Val * !Li tbree races of £15.600), Genial fsix r f 12 - 40 - Gouvernant (eight of £13.000), i a £fL (t Z° & £4 P 00) - and Cains (SPven ot £3300). M. Blanc's winning two year o'ds were principally fillies, Blue Fly, Bel'e Fleur. and Belle de' New York, all by Flyin < ! L Fox ' thon * h he also secured a nee and is a full brother to Ajax and Adam.

V*?k En « Ush writer "Kapler" :- -65 c Wend Kenton case linger, Lh, ..i ltely t0 d 0 so lor som « time. One jwv e d ,? n ,° u ? ces the secrecy with which Jockey uiub investigations are held," and tne roily of this complaint must surely be obvious after a single moment's thought. Suppose investigations were held In public —that is to say, that reporters were allowed to attend and record evidence. The Jockey Club is not a privileged tribunal as a court of justice Is, and the witnesses who bore adverse testimony would not be protected from possible actions In the law courts. The stewards of ,the Jockey Club are dealing with a subject they understand; It Is practically certain that In a court of law judge and jury would equally be Ignorant of the subject, and knowing nothing of racing, evllence as to bets, etc., which wonld convey a very direct and certain significance to experts would mean nothing to his lordship on the bench and the dozen puzzled "bulwarks of liberty" in the box. The stupidity often displayed among special jurors can only be realised by those who have been frequently caught to eerve, or by counsel who know how jurors can be bluffed and beguiled. Is it very likely that witnesses would come forward and speak out?

The ftoadon "Sportsman's" Continental enrresoondent says that the thoroughbred class of the permanent Hippie Congress has elect<>d M. Edmond Blanc, breeder and owner, as well as a member of the Chief Stud Council, as its president. M. Jenn Joubert. who If well known in the racing world, and would openly resent the idea of the Government making a book had he not occunied a position In the Stud Commission inventing him with a certain amount of official responsibility, has been nominated secretary. The body referred to has had to devote its attention to certain auesttons interesting to their «olleaeues and the turf generally. Among th* matters for consideration is the exnr«>«sed intention of certain railway comoanie< to increase the rates hitherto charged for the carriage of thoronehbred horses by 2S ncr cent. Under existing rates, racehoree* are only charged half the ordinary tariff, but nrobnbly the strain on the resource of the different «onrfenles owing to the Increased number of Horses travelling giver a basis for the demand made.. Another question affects the" surplus reqelnta of the different racing societies. It Is suggentecl that the total amount of receipts made by the racing societies shall, after payment of the •XDenses assented to by the Government auditors, be entirely devoted towards the Increase of the amount of added money distributed among winning owners.

bays an exchange:—lt is greatly to be hoped that early next year, and throughout the season, matches will be made and ruu. for it would be a melancholy thing if this form of sport were to be discredited because of the unfortunate "race" between Plari and Fitch Battle. For the moment match-making is a discredited business, and It therefore behoves good sportsmen whose names carry confidence to bring it again into good odour. It Iβ, of course, a quaint "double event" to win the Two Thousand and be warned off in the same year, but for the present Mr de Wend Fenton's. name drops out; it is past history; and it appears that the pink and white striped jacket, winch came so near to carrying off the Two Thousand of 1885 (and would in all probability have got the race had Fred Archer on Paradox been objected to), is not to be seen, for an Indefinite period. A well-made match is a particularly Interesting race. It may be assumed that several good Judges on each side think that the horse they are backing up—l Co not mean merely betting on—will win; for though there are not a few independent owners, in my experience a match Is generally the result of consultation and argument. In a straight match the odd? ought never to-be more than about 11 to 8 on either, unless since the contest was arranged one of the animals concerned has directly or collaterally done something brilliant. A few good matches • would *rehabritate that branch of sport; if owners do not make any for early next year, single-handed opposition will be left under a cloud.

An English paper says that tie French Government has already Inserted the thin edge of the wedge into Turf legislation. The appointment of certain members ol the Committee of the Societe d'Enconrajement, independent of the Jockey Club, gives those who benefit by the funds obtained from the "Mutuals" a deliberative voice i.n those councils where tn,e integrity of the Turf has to b-e pitted against those who, as owners, jockeys, or horses, are potent factors or units in the lottery provided by the State. Gate receipts nave fallen off. The public who formerly paid their 20fr. for admission to paddock and ring find that they can play up their broad silver pieces just as weil for a franc on the heath, while the friends of the Government have advised that, for the convenience of those who "take an interest in. racing," It would be w-ell to follow the example of the Germany Racing Societies and found offices In the city with telephonic' communication to the course, so as to permit those who are prevented by business from attending the meeting having the usual facilities accordpd 'them. The Ring maintains its expectant attitude, although here and .there bets arp offered and accepted under the rose at "Mutual" prices. The shrewd man can rover his .speculations and minimise his loss by investments at the machine. In the meantime many "small industries" have sprung -up. and It-Is said that the "bonnets" who stand round the offices where the payment of winnings is made, do not lose tbeir time indicating to friends the man who is worth "dipping. , ' .

As to hurdle races we may derire some niTtminattnjr lessons from the programme under consideration. They . seem to teaeh,as already hinted, that where the smallest ire dlstribnted, the rush for Bold is keen. No fewer than elpht wpro stripped to gallop at thpir best pace "over the sticks" for 24 sors. and thp waperln? wns sufficiently brisk to nlea*e connoisseurs. They bad sanp»d the sitTiation with some dejrree of, a<rnraer. since the second farourite inst bent the first favourite by half a Ipnjrth. whilst some of the others are likely to do better after they hare had mor.» nrarticp. Such steam as they may possess Is s-enerated too nlowly, and one Is not Inclined to fear risks associated with a. bnrstinsr of the boiler. A mald»n hurdle race of 24sots—a convenient amount bo as to escape penalties—also attracted eight runners; It was a very spirited affair. All seemed to be trying to the best of their ability, and some of tbe jockeys were riding w> hart* long way from home that the

prize have been colossal instead of infinitesimal. The owner of the winner was entitled to applause, for he did not get much else. After paying his jockey, his trainer, his travelling expenses, and other inevitable charges—since one cannot take a racehorse about the country without being heavily taxed for one's audacity—there would be little or nothing left for himself. The love of sport is, however, its own reward; men who hanker after the loaves and fishes must look elsewhere. What sweeter gratification than to win a race, even If it is only a little one, and the finish has been almost sanguinary? "No matter how email the stake," says a practical authority, there will always be plenty of horses to run for it, and if their owners were shaken, up en masse, few coins would trickle, from the conglomeration." Nobody can expect to race for next to nothing duriDj the winter and Increase bis savings or Uibonpolnt. ■

Says "Ranker": To be content frequently wlwth email remuneration seems to be the fate of the hardest -workers. They become so thoroughly absorbed in tbeir toll tbat any Ideas which they may have once cherished Oβ to making money are gradually abandoned as futile, if not Impossible. Thus, during the winter campaign, we see many racehorses galloping long distances over big fences for a trifling stake. The less cash offered—it is an o.d story—the more people appear to want it, and, also, the more desperate are their struggles to taste the sweets of possession. Sundry curious points call for notice In this relation. At a recent successful meeting under N.H. rules, for Instance, the value of the most important prize was 38sove, and there were plenty of runners. It may be urged that they did not go very fast, but there is little reason to doubt that they went as fast as they could, especially towards the finish, and that, whether they won or were "down the course," they very probably tired enough when the race was ended. A bad horse doing his best takes more out of himself, so to speak, than does a superior performer who wins .with his head Iα his chest. This, too. Is an attractive titbit, as scheduled In the programme under notice, namely, "open light-weight steeple-, chase of 24sovs, three miles." Four strenuous competitors were saddled for that event; they were all backed, apparently, as If their owner were aching to make the game pay a little by way of terrible speculation; and, happily, visitors had a nice long , run for their money. If they had seen six five furlong scrambles on the flat for thousands of founds., they would not have enjoyed such a glorious feast of genuine racing ac thus provided, with a series of large jumps thrown in so as to increase the risks and to Intensify excitement It Is wondered who is. able to pay the piper, having regard to the small sum.be receives If he is perfectly successful. "Nobody but an enthusiast," said a cross country patron, "ought to be at this game; .and, as is well known," he added, cheerfully, "what money enthusiasts have when their sponge goes up is not enoush to buy boot poMsh, mwh less boots." True words are often, spoken In jest, even when the jester Is nnfamlliar with his snbjeet

On the subject of breeding, a. writer la an exchange pens the, following: Happily there is a bright as well as a sombre side to the- present-day turf picture, for it ranks among Its votaries some of the best personalities in the State, while country gentlemen of high station and prestige devote much time and attention to, and derive much pleasure in, the breeding of the thoroughbred. Fortunately, gentlemen In holy orders are not debarred by the ethics of their profession from the pleasures attendant npon farming, or the study of the laws relating to the procreation of plant or animal life, and many of them take as much, surely more, pleasure In raising, a good horse as does the man who dreams of big betting races and a' broken, ring. If the clergy were debarred from stock raising, the world would never have known and appreciated the many picturesque figures in broadcloth who have gained world-wide renown in the show rings of Great Britain, and even Australia, aa cattle,- sheep, and horse breeders.\ Foremost among . clergymen whose names find a place in the English Stud Book was the late Rev. Mark Sykes, a relative of the great Sir Tatton of that ilk, and, therefore, kinsman to the present Sir Tatton, who worthily fills his illustrious father's place in Yorkshire, and has maintained the S'edmere Stud on lines even more giltedged than in the days of the most famous Sir Tatton, who has been immortalised by "The Druid" and every writer on farming 1 and blood stock breeding that flourish in his day. Tt t present Sir Tatton's most famous purchase was La Fl'eche, for whom, In consequence of the French opposition, he was compelled to pay 12,600 guineas. A. few days after' this—Baron Hirsch's great sale—at which Graf ton was purchased for Australia at 500 guineas—there was a large and representative gathering of noblemen, gentlemen, farmers, and stockbreeders at a luncheon in connection with a local show Iα Yorkshire, and the' duty of proposing an important toast devolved on the rector of the parish. This "was a delicate task for a gentleman of his position to tackle at that time, for just then the voice of the Nonconformist was rampant' throughout the - land, and the leaders r of that formidable body were monopolising the greater , part of the limelight in start parts of epoll sports. They endeavoured to resuscitate and bring into operation the obsolete "Dog Muzzling Act" to prevent fox hunting, were loudly calling upon somebody to plough np the racecourses, stud farms, and other hotbeds of iniquity, and virulently attacked the Prince of Wales and the then Prime Minister (Lord Roeebery) with voice and pen for participating in sport. The Noni conformist wave caused a good deal of alarm among English sportsmen at the time, ac they bad the influence of several Anglican bishops, as well as powerful newspapers behind them. Considering his cloth and the probability of hostile criticism from the anti-sporting crowd, it was nervy of the reverend gentleman mentioned in I the previous paragraph to face a little army of newspaper reporters, and publicly eu'ogise Sir Tatton Sykes for the plnck and patriotism In rescuing the best mare (a racehcrse In fact) in England from expatriation to the Continent The sturdy Yorkshire parson told his hearers that so long ac the gentlemen of England kept the best mares In tie country, so long would the English thoroughbred reign pre-eminent as a racehorse. The Irish clergy dabble to a much greater extent among horses than do their English brothers of the cloth, and I am told that it is not at all an uncommon sight to see a local or visiting P.P. at every meet of hounds, either ac a spectator to coyer, or an active participator in the run. Of course, there are Irish bishops, who .do not approve of the Church soldiers taking part in a fox chase, and it is on record that one issued a ukase ordering all his subordinates to withdraw from the sport. One of the priests In this bishopric, who bred and broke his own hunters, was much disturbed by the order, but he got over the difficulty in truly Irish fashion. The hounds were running north, and "his Elverence" was in - the front rank going beautifully, when suddenly the M.F.H. spotted him and called out, "Why, Father Tom, I thought the Bishop debarred you from fox hunting?" "Faith, so he has, but I'm' not hunting. I'm making- a sick call." "Who'e sick?" "Ould Mrs O'Brien." "Why, you're going in the opposite direction to Mrs O'Brien's cabin." "Faith, so I am. Dlvid's cure to this horse, he always, takes mc the wrong way, and I'm' of opinion that It's little use in thrying to stop him till the hounds check." The winner of the last Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase, the cross country Blue Ribbon, was bred by a parish priest stationed in the neighbourhood of Lord Dunraven's estate In County ';. where his Australianbred sire, Kirkiiam, a brother to Cran- ' brook, did duty. Mentioning this to an Irish barrister, resident in Sydney, "he promptly replied, "Why, half the jumpers in Ireland are bred by the clergy." Stallion service Is very much cheaper In Ireland than in England. A horse that could command 20 guineas in England would not be supported at more than five in Ireland, and then not at all, unless pasesd as sound and free from hereditary disease by the agent of the Irish Breeding Boclety. Therefore, a poor Irish priest Is In a very much better position to Indulge in a little stock* raising tham Is Us English compete.

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Bibliographic details

......THIS ..... Racing World, Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 6, 6 January 1906

Word Count
2,947

......THIS ..... Racing World Auckland Star, Volume XXXVII, Issue 6, 6 January 1906

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