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THE SULTAN IN FEAR.

SLAYS-HIS BRQTE6ER.I

STRANGLED IS BEDROOM.

An official announcement ihasbeen. Issues in Constantinople to the effect that the Sultan's brother. Prince Ahmed Kemal din, was dead and bnried, and there are good gronnds for believing that he was strangled by order of his Imperial brother, the Sultan Abdul Hamid of Turkey. Since tne mnnier of King Alexander of S«rvia. in June, 1903, the Sultan of Turkej-'s fear of assassination has become a perfect mania. According to trustworthy reports from his immediate surroundings. Abdul Haaud's forebodings are gloomy in the extreme. He has withdrawn more and more from immediate contact with the nation and has turned his palace into a fortress which sereea him at the same time as a voluntary prison.

The events in Russia also have affected the Sultaa's health. If a revalutiea were to break oat in Turkey toe Suitan knows that the people would nox imitate the example of the St. Petersburg workmea, aHd approach their monarch unarmed to lay their grievances before him

Abdul Hamid knows that every Tort is armed and understands aow to. mate good use of his weapons. A revolution in Constantinople, if successful, would inevitably result In the savage butchery of the Sultan and his courtiers. Tile contemplation of these terrible possibilities ha* driven Abdul Hamid into a frenzy of fear. He smells poison in every disJi, regards every group of persona engaged in conversation, as conspirators against his power, asd sees an assassin in his own shadow. KILLED FOR A GESTPRE. A tragic incident which occurred in the palace of Yildiz Kiosk recently afforded an example at Abdul Hamid's frenzy of fear. One of the. Sultan's aide-de-camp, Chalid Pasha, who had been in his monarch's personal service for nearly a decade, and had proved himself to be an absolutely, faithful and trustworthy servant, was summoned to Abdul Hamid's presence to present a report on some matter of State.

In tlie course of this report Chalid Pasha thrust his hand into his pocket ta produce a document which lie desired to submit ta the Sultan. Seeing the motion of the officer's arm, Abdul Hamid immediately jumped to the concinsioa that his aide-de-camp was drawing a weapon to assassinate him. Quick as thought, the Sultan shot the aide to death.

On another recent occasion the Sultan conceived the idea that his brother: and heir apparent. Prince Muhammed Beahad, was conspiring to kill him and take possession of the throne. PUTS BROTHER INTO DUNGEQS. The prince was arrested and thrust Into a dungeon within the walls of Yildiz Kiosk. The Sultan was thoroughly eonvinceß of his brother's guilt, and formed a resolution to have him executed en a charge of high, treason. The necessary orders for the execution were issued, and Prince Muhammed Bashed was informed that his Imperial brother had sentenced him to die oa the scaffold.

The sentence, however, was not carried ont immediately to the Oriental habit of procrastination, and in the interval which ensued reports of the Sultan's mnr.derous Intention became known among the members of the diplomatic corps in Constantinople, most of whom maintain close connections wtta persons within the palace in oroVr t<r procure nsefuf information. SAVED BY AX ENGLISH iMBASSADOB. '"The Eigliah Ambassador "natt' reason toprotect Prince- Mnhammed Kesbad. and heintervened" pn his behalf. The Sultan was at first.obdurate, and It is understood that the Eng-lish Ambassador had to resort to energetic measures to save the prince's life. According to one version current in Constantinople, the English Ambassador threatened to bring an English fleet Into the Bosphorus and to bombard Yildiz Kiosk if th* sentence of death on Prince Mohammed Raahed were actually carried out. The Sultan gave way to English coercion aad granted his brother freedom.

The fate which Prince Muhammed Reahad escaped has now overtaken Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin. The prince's untimely end was due primarily to the fact that he had excited the enmity of Fehin Pasha, the chief of the palace police -who are entrusted with the protection ef the Saltan at Yildiz Kiosk. POWEB OF FEHIN PASHA. Fealn. Pasha U thus one ot the most powerful personages in Turkey, and lie has exploited his opportunities with reientfeea cruelty.

Fehin Pasha is of plebeian origin-, and was formerly an ordinary detetffctve of tie political secret service" in Constantinople.

He contrived to attract the Saltan's' attention by "discovering" and plots which he himself had concocted witathe help of willing friends, and which, ended in a number of absolutely innocent persons being baniehed to remote districrs of Asia Minor. One morning tile Turkish capital awoke to lind tbat Fehin bad been made a Pasha and appointed chief eff the palace police with toe rank of major-general. EAJBNS HATRED OP PASHA. Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin excited Fehin Pasha's enmity in the first place by treat* ing the ambitions plebeian with contempt.

Fehin Pasha's enmity rose to a boiling point, however, when Prince Ahmed Kemai Eddin secured possession of a beautiful Circassian woman whom the chief of the palace police coveted for his own harem, and Pehin Pasha resolved there and then to nave revenge. Fehin Pasha concocted a story ot a plot by Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin to dethrone the Saltan. Fehin Pasha caused letters to be forged, which were alleged proofs -of the prince's guilt. Hp also procured perjured witnesses to s talse oaths regarding Prince Ahmed Kexnal Eddin's participation in a treasonable conspiracy.

Fehin Pasha told the Sultan brie«y that he had discovered a plot to dethrone and assassinate him, and tbat this plot was to be earned out on the following day. ACCUSES STTLTASTS BROTHER. "The originator of the ploc." said he to the Saltan, "is your Majesty's own brother, Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin."

Fehm Pasha then produced his documentary "evidence," and summoned from an ante-room the perjured, witnesses. The Saltan's agitation knew no bounds. He declared—

"My brother shall die on. the day on which he intended my assassination should take place; instead of ascending the Turkish thsone he shall descend into his own irarre."

The Sultan thereupon gave Fehin Pasha ■rerbai orders to carrj- oat the execution of his brother, swiftly and sscretly, oa the following day.

Early aext morning Petin Pasha himself, accompanied by three Albanians of the Saltan's palace bodyguard, presented himself at the deot of Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin's palace and demanded, admittance^"jjj* plotter was condneted to the prince's ffri, vste chamber. Prince Ahmed div was asleep iV tte* wfcea. Fehi.pV; Paajjs epeneid -the door cvf his bedroom - aistl entered, followed by three Albanian soldiers? *

I STRANGLED IN HIS BEDROOM. .J^Prince; up a^ /r pn£e^ex<jiaimin?} .t&e/xDeaninjgf-bic '.[.£)£\s~ intrusion 1 p<w i iiceman?** 't■ : ~--r*

Fehin Pasha. wlso ; JKad*"cTd§€ia. .tfie, do»a behiad him, '■"■' ■•■•»-*_• ~~^£^" •■H|s Imperial 3|aiiests?'.Se Stfttan. aai £o death. and these soldiers n»re orders to carry put the execution- ie^ediately. , ' - • Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin cnefl ont; aadl attempted to reach a second dSoVnea.iing from his. chamber Jnto'that part of the palace in which the members of his harem resided. The Albanians, whose fwocity~i3 proverbial, seized the prince, threw him down on his' own bed. and strangled, him with a rich silken scarf. Within two hours the body of the prince was in its jrruve. Ko one saw it except Fehin Pasha, the three Albanians, and tve attendants who assisted in the burial of the body, wrapped only in a linen sheet. AXNOUXCEIfENT OP SUDDEN DEATH. An, official communication was theu issued by the news bureau of the Turkish Government and telegraphed through the wdinarj channels to all parts of the world, to the effect tnat Prince Ahmed Kemal Eddin had died suddenly and had been buried.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19050805.2.102

Bibliographic details

THE SULTAN IN FEAR., Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 186, 5 August 1905

Word Count
1,271

THE SULTAN IN FEAR. Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 186, 5 August 1905

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