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Racing World

IST

Says an exchange-.—Although there were 15 runneffs for the Royal Hunt Clnb at Ascot (Fjvigland) last month, backers took he shoirt. price of 9 to 4 about a three-rear-oldi named Sir Daniel, who was haniienppe.d at 6.8. The favourite sadJy disppour'ted his supporters, the winner tuning nri in Andover, a 10 to 1 chance, with Pharfis»?e (16 ro 1) second, and Dean Swift 3 to 31) third. It is probable that in England there will ac an alteration -with regard to appren-3<\-es" allowances. At a meeting of the l->ckey Clnb, fixed for the 19th of last i raonth, Lord Crewe was to have moved ; that it was desirable to diminish the i amount of weight claimed by apprentices ! under rule 00, and to extend the time dnr-! ing which the allowance can be claimed , by lads when riding horses trained by the j person to whom they are apprenticed. ! The French Grand National Steeple- I chase of -lOsovs each, with 5000sova and • a trophy valued 400sovs added, welght-for- i age, four miles and a-aalf, was run at ' £uteil on Sunday, June , and was won by M. Jean Stern's four-year-old colt Canard : (a 4 to 1 chance), ridden by the English Jockey, P. Woodland. The French Grand Annual Hurdle Race, of 24sovs each, with 2000eovs added, weight-far-age, three miles and a furlong, run on the same course on the following Wednesday, went to the Eng-lish-owned Karakoul, by Wolf's Craig. Karakoul. who is the property of Mr G. A. Prentice, was ridden by ilr 3. Ftrgu- \ son, and started at 2 to L j In discussing the advisableness of increasing the distance for the Alexandra i Plate from- two an-d three-quarter miles to I three miles. "Vigilant," in the London "Sportsman," urges that three miles is a distance "which carried credit with it to j the winner all the world over wherever | the British rhorrmghbred Is held th honour I —and that, I tliink. is everywhere, except the Hunters' Improvement Society, for j whose benefit 'jet mc reproduce a question I asked the otr 4 er day by one of the best known Yorkslilre dealers. Someone broached the subject of using the Hunters' Improvement Society's halfbred sires, and without deigning to discuss that Mr . the dealer in question, replied. 'Aye, but how are we to breed the "mugs" to buy the stock?." How. indeed? Will the H.I. Society oVfer a suggestion?" A writer ia an exchange says he has heard that it has been finally decided by Captain Greer to retire Gallinule ■ a!tog<-«ther from stud duties after next seascm. The great sire will be twentytwo years old in ISOB. The writer adds that this will probably have the effect of sen'ilng the fee of Galllnule's best son, Wlidfowter, from 60 guineas up to 100 gnineas, especially as the last-mentioned borses's progeny are doing so welL WUdf.owler is only nine years old, so that he' has ample time in which to make a great name for himself at the stud. The chances i are that if WUdfowler's brother Condor could be landed In England as well as he looks at present, he -would realise a very different price to the 35 grtrineas he was sold for -when he was last submitted to auction in that country. From an exchange we clip the following: | In South Africa the bookmakers have re- ( ceived a nastj- knock, the Turf Club of i that country having decided to conduct { racing without them. As bookmakers are i also barred from all French racecourses | from tbe beginning of next month, it I wonld appear that they are not as indis- ; pensable as some members of the fraterI nity believe. One of the amusing items in connection with the present trouble anent - licensing -fees in Sydney- is that -snme~-of the odds-layers have been querying, in all seriousness, "Where will the" clubs get : bookmakers if we refuse to bet?" WeiT, bookmaking may not be as profitable nor -as easy as many-think, but. all the same; if the present let of bookmakers- remain Arm in their attitude towards the proprietary clubs, they will rliscover that there Is no particular -difficulty about filling their places. ''Ranger.- the 'English writer, in writing en the subject of betting, say3:— With regard to betting, a friend of mine tells mc that he has one Invariable rule; if ever he is what he calls "ia front" at 'a meeting, he stays there. Having been at the game for a long while, he has discovered that his chances of winning are remote. Times out of number he has won to begin with, or perhaps has "got home" with a bit to the good. Then, being "in front" he plays- at what used to be called "Button Park"—the late Duke of- Beaufort so called a horse, who won the Great Yorkshire Stakes at Doncaster. It means, of courses buttoning up your winnings and not straying from the park into dangerous grounds outside, where you may meet with disasters. I recognise the wisdom of my friend's theory without approving of it. partly because for most men it is an impossible condition of affairs. Either you are wise or foolish when you go racing, that is to say, you do not bet at all or you do; I have 1 preached against the folly of the practice for many years and sedulously disregarded my own excellent precepts. Sfy friend's theory is a counsel of perfection. What man is there who, having won : a tenner over Aggressor in the Craven ■ Stakes at Epsom last week, would have let the Derby and Oaks, and two dozen— j exactly two dozen—other races go by anO ' j not have had a wager? There are sure tx j be two or three, or half a dozen, things ■ that a backer fancies, and can he have the ' j resolution to piay at "Button Part" ant! ■ | decline even to give his tenner a chance" ij It is not within (speculative) ihnmai . j nature. The way to win is to bet with ( j the ring's money—when yon can gei ' i hold of any of it to be with; and. as a '', ceneral rule, bad days are due to tht II temptation of having betted to **get home,' . j the most fatal of mistakes, fox the mar ' ] who bets small and with care on the first ' race or two will back anything for nc -1 zood reason, and for large sums at the enc j of a bad day. As a may. o! [ I fourse. be exceptions—a man who is loslnj ! ought not to bet on the last two rac-cs I cr if he does, never beyond his nstml stake i not. I mean, to "set hocie." -which mi; , probably necessitate a dash; and he oughl t > make an absolutely inflexible rule neve: - to back more than one horse in these lasl » two races. i ~■ —— ~~ Horse-owners are often extraordin&rilj unobservant. They have the utmost con * Sdence in their coachmen, faithful oh ! thoughtless blunderers, and pay no atten ; tion to thincs themselves. One afternooi , not long since the subject of bearing-rein; \ was rfisr-ns&?d. »nd one of the ladies pre : sent was specially emphatic in her denun 1 oiatiou of the iniquities of the practice. Sb . was anxious to subscribe to the funds o . the society that is responsible for the pic tares we see on hoardings of a pair o J horses properly bitted, standing comfort . Rbly. and of the pair that are barbarousl; j borne up and are sufFerinjtly accordinzl-v I took her to the carriage when she lef? t and was surprised to see her horses tossln - their heads, with foam-flecked lips, strainer > up jnst about as tightly aa the malefacto , on the box could screw them. "Aren"r you bparing-reins rather severe?" I mildly in - quired. "Oh. now. I don't think so!" sh - reolied. "I r»tfcer thought they were th j other day. and spoke to Jones about it. tra he says it is necessary with this pair. The * have rather peculiar months." I shout T denriy have liked te keep him for a corral 3 of hours with his head fastened at a siinila an trie: but his kindly mistress, full of syrr pathy for horses, was persuaded that h 1 could not do wrong. l To my thinking there will be a grea contest for the Enclish St. Leger. Th * colts will need to be at their very bes - to beat the Oaks winner, Cherry Lass, wh< i arpears to have wto her i»-.-» withor being called ' upon for any great effor' "Augur," In the "Sporting Life," says: "She was t*e Queen of the Paddock - real Keenly tl look at. with snUmdid q*s ters. in which there is enormous po-js* .. lerking. She is a very excitabie man - and Tras core than- once disposed to. C damage with ..her heels. She' ran -"in Ih-v-iL ard when it was put on she ws x j decidedly restive for aw hUe. Afte?' sr had saddled she was allowed ro^'hai a a drftrt. of water out cf. a pail—a nro^eet rug sufficiently unusual to be worth? < a I acre. I notice that Cherry Lass ci gajed in the St_ Lege*, and it Is «o i J»[i»rT»ed that nothing will happen to prawn jaer eeapsfcinj in tkat great ~iw**Baoi'

race, which promises to, be suite a scesatioaai affair- Among the- prospective candidates are Cicero, Jardy, Vai d'Or. Llangibby. and, as I Save said. Cherry Lous If these alone -were te so to the post the contest would be" worth crossing i continent to witness." The fact 'hat she reduced the time record for tiie ra.ee to 2min Bsec, which was faster than Cicero's Derby, tells that she mnst be a clinking iilly. Says "Rapier T ' in the "Sportiag end Dramatic News":— Xobotfj connected wit-a. racing is listened to with more respect than i£r George Lamb ton. He was,.as.a_ rider, quite In the first class. wit& such wonderful hands that no horse ever polled with him, and when be took up training as a serione business, he. speedily., siio wad himself a master of the business. His letter to the "English Sportsman" on"" the subject of the "two steeplechase jockeys who were fined for cruelty to animals cime. therefore, with peculiar authority, and it Is well that it should "have been written, for enemies of the Tnrf would be likely to quote the affair aa aa example.of th<? perverted lMtlncts of the racing man. ana Mr George EambtoiTs "severe condemnation will put a different aspect- on the-affair. Aa '"brutal., cowardly., and senseless,"' h« most properly describes the conduct of the two Jockeys who struck their norses witi their whips when their -races--were- over. One of them frankly admitted that, he had lost hie temper, and did not attempt t» defend his action. "As Mr Lambtbn remarks, •if these two had been up- before the stewards instead of before a bench or magistrates the penalty exacted would have been considerably staffer. It desirable to show that no one defends cruelty in connection ~ wiCh racing, "and tnie Mr tambton did.- A-jeckey-mast oftea •*nn-isiu"_-.and. .there-.ar.e_.time3_ when... a. horse needs a sharp reminder- but to strike aa animal after" a race "Is an'offen"ce~whlcl» should be visited on~the-culprit-moKe-iarsa-ly than by the fine of a few shillings. Tβ tiie man who is unfamillaE-with th.s ways of the turf, here is something startling, a writer in the "Grand Hagazine" says. in the largeness of the sums staked on the-speed of horses. ■ Had- Gaper won the Derby of 1543 Lord George Beuttacli.wonld. have been £150,000 the richer; but though Gaper was not even, 'among the' first three , the race pat £30,000 into-Bentincfs pocketIn a single 12 months, two years later, Lord George's net winnings by betting reached the enormous sum of £100,000. Joha Gnlly, in partnership with Robert Rldsdale, brought off many big coups, including £60,000 on St. GHes -for-the Derby, an* £45.000 won for them by Margrave in the St. Leger. Mr Merry added £70,000 to his bank balance by Thormanby's Derby win; Sir Joseph Hawley netted £80,00Q.0n Beadsman; Mr Caaplin, £100,000 on Hermit; and 31r Jfayior an equal amount on Macaroni. terd Glasgow had f e-w, it anyrrrvals - in his time as a sensational bettor. - On one occasion, it is said, he even ..took .Lord .George Bentinck's breath away by offering to lay him £90,000 to £30,000 against" Bis~ horse Gaper; and Sir Joseph. Hawiey-once took £40,000 to £600 apiece about each, of his five fillies In the Derby. Probably tlie-neav-iest betting Derby, on record was that oZ 1851, when Teddington was the winner, .Davis, the "Leviathan" bookmaker, received a staggering blow; but-he - paid his losse3 of £100,000 as indifferently as if they were "so many pence. That enormous sums, fcowever; could be won. on the turf without betting was proved in the case of Lord Glas- - gow, who during hia career as- an owner astually received over £300,000 in stakes. The periodical protest against bearingreins has broken out again -in- England—it ris due .at.-tbls-'eeasea of—tjte* yeapj T *nd Is doubtless amply justified. A way; with them. as : an abomination, is tiie usual cry, and it is eqnally exasperating to the : hnman'e man .and the man of ordinary common-sense to see heads bqsne ajMEo a T ana unnatnraJ angle, with a thick-headed-brute of a coachman sitting stolidly behiifd. then*. Some sensible remarks on the- subject appear in the last book that has. Been pub--lished in "Riding and Driving"—"EMlng" by Mr JB. L. Anderson,, who at" "one time contributed frequently to these- columns. "Driving** by Mr Price Collier, who says. '"The- question of bearing-reins Is not a question of bearing-reins .or .ne bearingreins. but a question of the use and misuse of bearing-reins. Kb horse-"or pony of" spirit should -be driven by a woman or -a- child without a bearing-rein. It prevents the animal from rubbing his head against shaft or pole, and catching and perhaps puling his bridle off; It prevents him from getting his head down between his legs and becoming unholdable;. and it-makes-kicking more difficult. . . On the other hand, the bearing-rein may be- used.' foe purposes oC fashionable distortion." The writer describes and condemns this atrocity- -in befitting terms. "The sides of tie horse'e mouth are drawn np, and with, a tight crnpper- to boot, the horse loote as if -be were tied together at the teeth and the tail. One sees little of this nowadays." (He ia speaking of America.) "Only the very newest dollars, daubed with unusual, ignorance, permit this turkey-cock style of harnessing." The English correspondent of the "Australasian," in commenting on the time test, pens the following:—l could not help; thinking when at a leading turf resort on the evening of Pretty Polly's extraordinary time in the Coronation Cup, what a difference had come over the opinions of Engnsbj racegoers on the value of the tinier-test. A quarter of a century agojiwheja in the very same club, 1 was ia the habit of pointing; ent its merits, and of how important .It was jndged to be and relied on in Australia, ane yet on all sides I met with. "wfiafTwas' practically ridicule. And even-so-lately-as ten years age bat little, was-thought of it. nor was the time ev»n taken or troubled about, excent perhaps for the classic ahS ; very hlgb>e!ass races. Now even the most conservative of writers admits there .may be something iv it. I am free to. admit that this change of face has been, in. a -great measure- brought about by tlxe advent of the American jockeys, -witn—their riding; their races from end to end, instead of, as in the old days, doddUng along for a mile and a quarter,, .and. only racing", the last fonr furlongs (often less than fhat) in. a mile and a-balf race: " TTn«er ' conditions one mint admit the timer-test could be of little value. Xow. trials under the watca are of everyday occurrence, and tne candidate so trieS fancied or "not for the forthcoming event by his ■-- performance . thereby- The. advent. of Australian., trainers, too, has no doubt- tended to convince our old-fashionei trainers—many of their fathers and grandfathers nave -been- trainers before them—that there is "something in it." Whatever the reason; there is no ridicule now in. England when one speaks ot time. . _ ... Says an "English writer:—With regard te the story of the local sportsman who has seen- seventy-nine races for the Derby without a miss—he is stni as keen as; ever, and it i≤ delightful to hear' his reminiscences—one might discourse to the point of exhaustion without doing justice to "that theme- He has certainly established/ a. record. What -a number -of-great-Jiorses he has seen in his long time, and what a lot he write "about "them "if""tfie game ■ween, in worth the candle, as to. what-he possesses. I.believe,..aa expert's knowledge-. His reticence .is. therefore, easily explained.' Another ancient resident informed me'-that he has seen so many contests for-the. Oaks that he has become almost a misogynist, and enjoys fits impressions aboat ladies- most-thorough-ly when the ladies are absent. "Fillies," ke added, with a chuckle, "are often hussies, and" when" one , "pots' Tnecej- "en theic, . perhape each way,- they-eften strip- -us, as I « In human. life,, for our absurd, confidence." » 1 Tet, seriously. I pointed out to aim that i' i Cherry' Lass is not a." nussy.but * BJerome, t 1 when he; eoneeded that -she- •is an-, eseept tion, or~.odds an, her would nojL.,aavfLJbeea laid till many metaHiciaas were debilitate*. I "All the same/ he saia, "'she Tan DiT>nnSi: t-hns showing tfeat-hec trainer -knewr •.- that if she saw- taalraaclj. she B»lght do. toe r common ' weaiaess of her ses.'" >. -If is not ijleaSant" "to" eoriv'Srse -' witfi:" 'thos* o r*cerbitists -ott-tlie- great-, twia- anbfeets aC a sport an&.ldve~." Ylews .are. .eiprfissed.:which, s J are not itlumlnatins; they may suggjast c {"that it Is Just as almefilt td"back"a winner c- ia3 to- marry- money.. Each-cccp-is soaae- [- i what" Bimilar. and, so far as cash receipts •f are concerned (tie crucial test), »snlt3 aie i-- extremely satisfactory." But, in-'i spert- '<• ing sense, we like to- enjoy a aeries ot more rt n>maniac thrills which..coin cannot .&uy. Iff x [ e»ljsioKs: aiw , «* a : little. Wie«?

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Bibliographic details

Racing World, Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 180, 29 July 1905

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3,029

Racing World Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 180, 29 July 1905

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