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......THE..... Racing World

Bar

RACING FIXTTJSES.

July 6 and 7—Gisborne R-C. Winter Jnly II and 14—Wellinstou B.C. Winter

j Mr Matthew Laird, a Queensland sports- : man. who races under the name ot "Mr jJ. Douglas," has decided to start a stud ; I farm in Australia, and with this object in ! ! view recently purchased the Kemp Paris j ! Estate, consisting of 1500 acres, at trlea ! lunes, N.S.W. j J An authority states that for an animal j I which suffers from chronic rheumatism, j | 2oz of carbonate of potash, with lOgr of ! j iodide of potassium, and Joz of powdered ' , su'phur, In the food every second day for j two or three weeks would be beneficial. !If the animal is an oid one, there is not 1 much chance of cure, i ■ John Porter recently realised on M. j Edmond lane's wedding present to him. |It will be remembered that on the occasion |of the Klngsclere trainers marriage, M. Edmond Blanc's genprous wedding present Ito him was a subscription to Flying Fox. j Miss Unicorn was the mare selected, after much deliberation, to fill the nomination. ! i The mare duly foaled a lily to Flyin.-r Fox. j and Unicorn and her foal were purchased, I last month by the Duke of Westminster. i j If racing is receiving hard knocks ia some States these times it is accorded i practical encouragement in others, notably the big State of Texas (says Xetf . York "Sports of the Times"). The Gover- ! nor of that Commonwealth signed a libenU j I racing measure the other day, with the bet- ! ting adjunct abont as tolerant as in oid | Kentucky. Already plans are under way • for four splendid racing plants, at Dallas, I San Antonio, Houston, and some other city ito be selected. i ; In Poland. ££c stable boys are object- ! ing to foreign competition, and have an- ; nouneed that they will go on strike nn- ! I1: ss all trainers and jockeys who are not | native born are dismissed- The foreign elej ment Is principally English and Ameri- ! car;. The Socialist Party is also taking a i hand iv racing matters', in htat country. ! and have demanded that the Warsaw Joek!ey Club shall not allow Russian horses or j jockeys to take part in their meetings. I I An English writer In commenting upon' I the success of St. Simon horses at th<? | stud, says:—"Shnonside is making quite a •success at the stud in South America, this J season, the principal winning two year olii.s •so far being by him. tl really seems as | though even the most moderate sons ot JSt Simon were bound to go np to the | top of the tree whereever they are -sent. j None more moderate than Simmer (by St. j Simon out of Dutch Oven) could well be imagined, yet even he has scored a triumph in Australia." I The following from a New York exI shows that there is still k-*en com-. i petition in America for promising joek—"Willie Harri.-i came from New | Fork to St. Lonis to buy the contract on' Radtke. the star jockey at Union. He made an offer of 3000 dollars, but it was re--1 f fsed. Harris tried to make the bay's em--1 n'oyers understand that Radtke's percentage of winners moght not be as large at i..elmoat Park as at Union, but they still wanted 5600 dollars. Harris would not pay it. although he offered that much at the Fair Grounds for the contract on Moriarty, a boy riding for C. E. Darnell." The great American three year old race, the 3elmont Stake, was run at Belmont i Part, Ne'A York, last month, and was won [by 11. P. Whitney's filly Tanya, who, with I 5.9. led all the way. cutting out the mile ! and n rpiarter in 2.8. Although the field j included nearly a!! the best colts and I fillies in the East, Tanya was a warm favmrlte at 11 to 3. The value of the stake toI the winner wag £3320, in addition to a plate worth £20*). On the same day. the j Grand National Steplechase, 24 miles, -was ! run, and won by Maekay Dwyer, who j carried 10.0. and started at 10 to 1 in a j j firfd of S. The winner's share of the stake 1 J amounted to £1002. -s, !

) The English stallion Cyllene. sold re- ' , cencly to Mr W. Bass for SO.QOOgs, will not ij? taken delivery of uutli to-day, Jnly 1, . j when he is to be paid foi and handed over jto his new owner. The fact that the horse I .-anuot be passed over before the date men- ! tioaed arises from the circumstance that . the present stud season is not yet con- , i c-luued. It may be mentioned that Mr [ • floss' celebrated mare Sceptre, for whom : [ ii_ paid iia.OOOsovs. Is in foal to Cyllene. ■ | who will probably stand in the future at t j the Glasgow Stnd. near Enfield. In dis- [ posing of Cyllene. Mr Rose made it a condi- ' j tion that the horse should remain in EngI land for a period of three years.

I The following is one cf the best years' ; told in America of how a smart man was I down:—There used to be great times j jat the old Beacon track, near Boston, ia l the old days, aud many a joke went around on afternoons after the races. There were all sorts of games going ou when | .ittie Reed, an old-time driver, called so j _or his diminutive stature, said to Dau j Mace, "I will bet you a lOdol note that I can dilvp my horse a half mile before you can drink a glass ofc beer." "Done," said Dan. So accordingly Reed went into the clubhouse, and brought out a glass of beer heated Ted hot. Xow.it takes a glass of beer a ion? while to cool. Reed jumped into the sulky after handing the beer to Dan. i and drove down the track.. Dan threw I -h;- beer away, and called to Reed to stop, | : that he would pay the bet. " ; I An English writer is responsible for the' j following:—Racing people are as a class j intensely superstitious, and iv this respect I they rival even the members of the theatri- • cal profession, who would not at rehearsaJ , j speak the "tag" of a piece, open an cm- j ' brella on the stage, be associated with peaI cock feathers, or whistle the Macbeth music. Consequently, when Dapplegrey I ! was seen to be a grey horse numbered 13' ion the card in a Seld of 13. many even of , those who fancied him for the City Selling i 1 Plate refused to back hlra. Dapplegray. i however, tloctod superstition "cy making all j the running ami winning Thongh he was i ; an outsider his victory was immensely pi.pu- '• • lar because he carried the yellow jacket , and black cap of the Duke- of Westminster. I When Dapplegrey was put up for sale it i 'at once became evident that the eompeti- | tion for him was going to be brisk. And Iso it was. and not until Mr Misa had bid ! TU) guineas did the hammer faiL This is i the largest price ever realised for a sellingI plate winner at Chester.

The sporting reporter on a couutiy paper in a neighbouring State, having obtained leave of absence to enter the houds of wed.ock, a member of the staff who knew not sport was sent to "do a local race meeting. A 'romp" who had part of -his copy to 3?t up once resided at Flemlngton. and therefore his surprise on reading, "the chocolate mare got badly away" may easily be imagined. He knew (says an exchange) the mare referred to was a livercoionred chestnut, and he said to the reporter. "TvTiere did yon get this fiom?" at the same time showing him the manuscript. -'That's right." said tile reporter, "it's on the card—look here!" And triumphantly producing the official, programme he pointed out the fine. -*Mi C. Watkius-s eh m Daffodil, oyrs. 8.8." The boy who "pulled" the proofs overheard tie conversation, and when the reporter's back was turned he said to the "eomp," with a contemptuous grin, ""TVfcere was he broush: np. I wonder?"

In some parts tof America the anthorI ities are right off racing, and referring to ! this state of affairs, a writer In the New I York "Sports of the Times" says: "The i warring clans of the Western turf are j still active, with unfavourable indications. !No one iraagin-s there will be racing at j Chicago this season, and some believe there will be no resumption of the_ sport for I some time. The tenure of ctucc of the ' State's Attorney is four years, while the ! Mayor of Chicago has two years. ProseI cutor Hcaly is relentless and unyielding. \ Therefore no concessions can reasonab.y Ibe exprcted before the uew regime tn 1910. |It has been said that the Legislature may ; possibly ameliorate matters iv the niean- ! time by a new racing law. on the lines lof the New York State ordinance, but it j must be coufessed signs and symptoms are j not promising. With antagonisms ia the ! rami granks. obviating necessary ovopj eration for the general welfare, what can j !ie expected?" About 20 years ago a couple of Blackall publicans, bitten business rivals, eac* owned a steeplechaser of great bscal reputation, aad both horses weie engaged In the Blackall SteepW'hase. a jumping race of much importance. After saddling his torse and whispering mysterious instructions to his jockey, publican No. 1 led his champion out ou to the running, and In a ' loud, defiant voice, thus unburdened himself: "if any of yqnse books wanter bet. I lay yer a thousad to eight "undred on this ol? b'.okt?."' pointing to his 'chaser. Publi•ran No. ~2. not to be outdone in liberality, yelled: "I'll go one better than that, and bet any of yes a level thousand my "orsc ■ wins!" Nobody to these doughty cliailengps. the collective bookmakers were designated "a ;ot of cocktails." and the horses were sent ois- their journey, only tobe beaten by a hide-bound old hunks." belonging to a party of sports who "worked"" the back country with divers seductive racesourse games. A London paper remarks that the One and Two Thousand Guineas '"double." brought off by the Foxhill trainer, W. T. I Robinson, with Vedas and Cherry is jby no means a rarity. During* the last 1 nity-tive years the two races had been «-ou jby aiffereut horses trained in one stable on six occasions, and tore ef imes by one animal. In 1554 oid John Day took the"double-" with Hermit and Virago; John Sc-ott with The Wizard and Sagitta in 1860, and again, two years later, by aid of The Marquis and Hunicane. Matthew Dawson likewise accomplished the trick twice, with Cambello and Spinawav hi 1875. and Charlbert and Wheel of Fortune lln 1579; while John Porter brought it off once, in ISBS. with Paradox and FarewellThe fillies that carried 4 off both events we±.e Formosa in 1868 (trained by H. Woolcot). who, fiowever. only ran a head for the Two Thousand Guineas with Moslem; Pi;gi image, in 187S, trained by J. Cannon; and lastly. Sceptre, in 1902* trained by R. IS. Slevler. .

An American exchange remarks that when it was recently announced that" Robert J. (2.1J) wa sdead, the pnbilc took it tor granted that the once famous pacer aad liri'oms physically so ÜBfit that it was for. .; advisable to put him to death in a humane manner. When later it was inTimatet! tbat the ex-champion had beea knocked on the head, and his remains fed to the chickens, the public cusmised the story as utterly absurd. Careful investigatinn' proves that the story of the inhumane butchery of Robert J.; at the Village Farm, is all too true. Nathan Shransa, of New York, sent .Robert J., to. the Village Farm in December, "with orders that he should have a good home "for the rest of his. days, for which ample payment would be provided. Inside 6f two months. 3?? Withe horse was yet In sood condition. French ordered one of" t£e~enip"loyees to take the horse out in a lot, knock him oc the head, quarter his carcase, and hang it up for the chickens to pick. French did not tell the man to sell the skin, but he did this on his own responsibility, receiving 2 dollars. % ~ In an article which Lord EUesmere kindly wrote for mc two or three years aeo (says "Ranger"). fe e s2 . Te a h >, 2*l sreat ' races for which he had been second. The list was a long one, and included Derby, Oaks, One Thousand. Middle Park Plate, etc. Second was ms familiar place again in the last One Thousand, Koorhaan occupying that nndesirable position. "Thank goodness 1 oackt-d the winner, in spite of the prie'e'"' some one near mc in the stand remarked, •3 t,6erry Lass, having been "straightened, not without difficulty-, won with some ease at the finish. "Yes," a friend repl-eci. but you are not quite sure of your money, 1 m There "must' be an objection." oo yon see whom the second belongs to'" was the rejoinder; and that seemed to settie it. Lord Euesmere has been racing in hauasome fashion for a good many years— he was elected to the Jockey Club in 1579 —and has never yet won a classic race tie is naturally anxious to do so, and I think there is little doubt that if had objected to the winner he would have sot the race, for Cherry Lass Damped his fil- & badly That he would object, however, no one for a moment regarded as possibleZLT°\ t !?' ? f as tslt - awe Pt as the fortune, the bad fortune, of war. if ever he Th e f m a bl ? race tbere wm be a cheer that will probably aAmish him.

'•vv l L re J > !L to ,. a / 01 7espondent ,wfca asks o the , founders of the English wfflr-vte " Dd St - Leger? " tte Sydney writer ♦Milroy" says: As regards the fir-t. SSV? DOt « nite Taoula £dward Stanley, the 12th Earl of Derby £ generally credited with being the founder °*"ie famous annual on Epsom Downs rww -T? the world as the Dwby, lt xs not, at the present day, aecn--areiy known whether the idea of establfshm 3 S££ RICC act iaUy originated with thf carl himself or with one of his many ra&nz associates. Probably one or more of" the —»,- may have suggested the title in compliment to the sporting nobleman, bein-' influenced thereto by the fact that his lord" ship was one of the most enthusiastic and urauentiai patrons of the turf, and had a eoantry residence at Banstead, in j-'ae vicinuy of Epsom Downs. There Is every reason to believe that Sir Charles Bunburv was the actual founder of the Derby—b« won the first race with hi* colt Diomed— for at a dinner party given Ay Sir Charfes at nis London residence immediately after tae i_psom meeting In ITT9 the details of trie hrst Epsom Derby were arranged, T>iomea s Derby was not the first race of that name rnn in the British isles, for far in the seventeenth century, at the time when the Earls -of Derby ruled over the Isle of Man, a race called the -Derby Stakes was annually run on a narrow stria of Vu<-f whien separates the bays of Derhyhaven and Castletown on that -island." made interesting hv Mr Hall Came, and which of late years has been most ponnlar with visitors °f the Arry order at" cheap excursion rates. The Oaks was established a year before the Derby at Epsom, and there is no doubt that the. Earl of Derby was sponsor for It, and Its name is that of his lordship s estate in -the-- vicinity. Strange to say, the first Oaks was won by Lord Derby's Bridget; by Herod. The Epsom Derby was established in 1781, five years after the inauguration of the St. Lejrer. another racethat was proposed after a good dinner -At the dinner -mentioned, the Marquis of Rockingham proposed, that, a ,-23 sweepstakes roi- three-year-olds should be run for _at Doueaster. aud out of'compliment' to LieutGeneral Anthony St. Leger. of Park Hill the race should be called the St LeerMakes. It is somewhat strange that toe arst St. Lezer should, like the" Derby and f?' ! to the proposer, as the Ha routs of Rockingham s Albaculla won it. If these three strand oM landmarks of th- turf lived :n our day, and won races „f th eir own proposal, there, would not he._wau.ting neoole to doubt their singleness of purpose aarttw hint broadly that they knew what thevwere up to when they madx- thoir prooositions- ■ — - - - - - - - -^ L

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19050701.2.90

Bibliographic details

......THE..... Racing World, Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 156, 1 July 1905

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2,810

......THE..... Racing World Auckland Star, Volume XXXVI, Issue 156, 1 July 1905

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