Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE.... Racing World.

Bi * Whalebone."

The West AustraUan Turi! Club made a profit of £1000 on its spring meeting.

On arrival iv India the English-bred racehorse Friar Tuck was insured by the International Horse Agency for £2500.

Mr G. Adams ("Tattersall") has donated £100 to the Tasmanian Racing Club (Hobart) as a prize for a race at the Summer Meeting.

News has been received that Gauleon has returned to the Randwick training tracks, so that his racing career would not appear to be over yet, despite his troublesome leg.

Redeemer, the ex-Australian hurdler, has proved himself a champion in South Africa, and was at last advices weighted at over 15.0. It is intended to send him to England. •

The English Jockey Club are trying to discourage owners from running good two year olds early in the season. They propose to make £200 the maximum stake for two year olds until the beginning of June.

Australian Star, who is owned by Mr Spencer Gollan, ran unplaced in the September Handicap at Alexandra Park last month, in which, according to the London "Sportsman," he had "no earthly chance with the weight allotted to him, although he runs better at Alexandra Park than anywhere else."

The American jockey, E. Ames, is back in India, says the Sydney "Referee," and at the Poena last month won the International Stakes on Yankee Boy. He is now connected with J. D. Scott's stable, having taken Ramsbaw's place, v change that caused a gdbd deal of comment in Poona racing circles.

That good fipss-country horse Brokerage, broke his Tiear hind leg while running in a paddock near his owner's residence, rtandwick. and had to be destroyed. Brokerage, who was by The Broker from Hermitage, was owned by Mr W. Alldrit, a well known bookmaker, and was an occupant of W. Gullum's stable.

An American writer says that Chicago is nothing if not sensational, and just now the gamblers and handbook pencillers are having a war to the knife among themselves. There are two cliques or syndicates, and the factional fur is flying fast and furious, with raids, arrests, pistols, Winchesters, and all that sort of thing.

When the American colt Africander recently made his record of 2.58 for 13 mile lie carried S.l, and Heno (whom he beat by a head) 9.0. The first six furlongs were run by Heno in 1.14 2-5, v mile in 1.40 2-5, mile and a quarter in 2.5 1-5, and mile and a half in 2.31 4-5. Africander was two lengths behind at that stage, but got up in time to score by the narrow margin already mentioned.

I have not heard of any big winners up this way over the New Zealand Cup, but a few backers supported Canteen at long prices. Local ringmen laid him, but not to the full extent of their books. Very few, however, have made much over their transactions. Wairiki would have been the worst horse for the local ringmen, and Mr Bradley and his friends would have thrown in for a big stake had Soult's son succeeded.

An American exchange says:—"E. E. Smathers. who recently purchased Major Delmar, gave 40,000 dollars for him. This Is said to be the highest price ever paid for a gelding. Smathers is one of NewYork's rich men with a taste for horse flesh. His agent bid for Lou Dillon when she was being sold at auction in the spring, but stopped when the 10.000 dollars mark was reached, I believe. Billings, the Chicago millionaire, bought her, and felt more than repaid when she trotted a mile in two minutes. Smathers, 'no doubt, saw in Delmar a rival, to game Lou Dillon, and that ts why he gave big money for the gelding."

A few years ago England had a small invasion of American trainers and jockeys, nnd their methods were all the Tage. One by one they have either returned to their own side of the Atlantic, or migrated to the Continent. There are but few now left, and the number of trainers is to be further reduced by the departure of J. Huggins and W. Duke," of whom the first-named is going back homo at the end of the season, with no present intention of returning, and the last has accepted a very large retainer to take charge of Mr Vanderbilt's racing stud in France. . _

The appeal entered "by certain owners of winners of classic races in Russia against their ruling off by the stewards of the respective Jockey Clubs for having contravened the Rules of Racing by drugging, or causing to be drugged, horses running in their colours, has been heard by the Imperial Stiid Book Cointmittee (writes the London "Sportsman"). In the result the opinions of eminent veterinary authorities were not accepted as conclusive, and the owners of the horses in question, well known on the Russian turf, have been reinstated, while the trainers have had a limit put upon their terms of suspension. The horses are not to be disqualified, and the owners are to receive the stakes won by their animals.

After West Australian had won the Guineas and Derby in such an easy manner, ne was made favourite for the St. Leger (says a writer in "Sporting Sketches ). Despite the money that was piled upon TUe West however, he went very badily in the market, and a desire to lay him, no matter what the amount, was always shown by the ring. Up to that time the triple crown had never been secured by one animal, and this possibly had something to do. with the opposition, though rumour said the cause was to be associated with the peculiarities of the jockey. Prank Butler, who had ridden The West in all his races, liked artistic finishes, and preferred cutting things fine to winning easily. He therefore wished to win the St. Leger on West Australian by the length of his arm." Isaac Walker, the Streatlam stud groom, however, had full command, in Mr Bowe's absence, and when he gave Bntler his orders would not hear of the proposed tight finish. "Them dodging ways don't suit me," he informed Prank. '•They make me shake in my shoes. Butler took The West in the easiest of winners, •md thus earned Isaac's commendation for riding to orders. "Yes, I thought of you during the race," remarked Frank Butler "and if those beggars behind hadn t stood still I'd have put you in a nice sweat, Walker."

Circumstances alter cases, says "Martindale" in the "Town and Country Journal. Had Sweet Nell won the Derby, Lewis was to have been presented with a goldmounted whip by Miss Nellie Stewart at the Princess Theatre. This would no doubt have been done before the audience witn the lights all on. Sweet Nell did not, however win, and the presentation was made in Private in a room in the theatre by the nmmlar actress, who, in doing so, said to Richardson"that she admired the way m I- £ h« ti-ifl always ridden to win—never H»-lst_. •&. a when y°V_T,t mine right paid best in the ■, ke „-y-jS^J&ePa ghisfof wine, Sir Rupert <_£_*% "o Richardson: ■■B-m_mb_r Miss Stewart's words. Ride to win evt'ry Hme- ride fairly, and alwayfl to reach the Jos-first." "Yes, sir," said the jockey and in response to a question from an actress who had backed Sweet Nell—they all did for the Derby—"Why didn't you let Sweet Nell catch you up?" said, "Because I had to follow my instructions, and did."

In the Prix Royal Oak, a race for three year olds, worth £"3122, run at the Parla autumu meeting, all the crack three year olds of the spring were beaten by the GO to 1 outsider Torquato Tasso, a. colt by, Callistrate. Viuicius, whom many reckoned should have won the English Derby, in which he ran second, and was subsequently beaten in his own country by Ex Voto and Quo Vadls, was an even money favourite for the last Royal Oak, aud his otahlo mate, Quo Vadis, started second favourite at 4 to 1. Among the runners were Ex Voto, Yildiz Kiosk, and Champs de Mais, throe good performers. Torquato Tasso won easily-) and ran the mile and seven furlongs in 3.24, Quo Vadis was second,. Champ de Mars third, and Vinicius last..

The Attorney-General of Tasmania has caused a hit of a sensation (says the -'Sydney Mail") by his recent action in giving notice, through the Police Department, of which he is the official head, to the T.R.C.,. that in future the police doing duty on the racecourse will in no. way interfere with any person found with a ticket of admission to the course, unless in cases where such individuals are misbehaving themselves. This would seem to mean that any] of the many bookmakers in Tasmania—• where bookmaking is illegal—can procure an ordinary admission ticket and ply their, calling in defiance of the club which owns or leases the conrse; that is so far as any, assistance from the police is concerned.

As a specimen of what sporting scribes in other" countries know about Australian racing, w'HJ'quote the following from an exchange :—"A writer in the "Transvaal Leader" has circulated a story through his paper that Kinglock won the Melbourne Cup with 10.4 on his back. An English writer attributes the par to sheer malice or opaque ignorance. Fancy Kinglock winning a two mile race? The writer further asserted that Kinglock was handicapped out of everything in Australia, and was sold for a song as useless for racing in this country." A Sydney writer, commenting on this, says: "The 'song' was 1000 guineas, and after he won the New, Year's Gift (one mile) with 10.6 up, Australian weight adjusters did not get much chance to 'handicap' him out of everything, as he was sold a few days later.

The following description by an English writer of the famous filly Pretty Polly,who recently added the Middle Park Plate to her numerous victories, will interest sporting folk:—"Pretty Polly's appearance is quite in accord with her performances. She is, Indeed, a-beautiful filly, massive and big' everywhere,-, and yet , with extraordinary, quality. Prolbably the filly.will always run big, but it must be understood that she has bone enough to carry her big frame, and, as far as we can judge, there is no fear of her breaking down. Her head is small and ,blood-like, and her forehand most graceful; while her quarters arc of the massive order,, and she carries a very big barrel. 'She is, however, beautifully turned, and is especially good from her croup to her hocks, and "in looking at her it is hard to realise that she is only two years old. Most of the good Gallinules show their best form at about a mile and a quarter." , _._,_ ■

The following paragraph from the London "Sportsman" Is of interest to the more particularly just now when Trenton's great daughter Wakeful, and hiC grandson, Lord Cardigan, have been doing so well: —"Trenton's position at the moment is a very peculiar one, for wherever his stock is to be found outside England it succeeds, whereas in this country there has been a run of ill-luck against it. The probably-. best three-year-old in Germany, last season was by Trenton; Knight Br-a-ant, the only Trenton two-year-old In America, has made a winning debut for an important stake (the Autumn) at Coney Island. . Knight Errant is the property of Mr. James R. Keene, and he is out of the St. Simon mare St. Mildred, who was mated with Trenton by Mr James McCalg and sent over to the late Mr Marcus Daly, at whose sale she was bought by Mr Keene. Knight Errant is well engaged in England next year, so he will very probably be sent over for Allen to train."

There is no gainsaying the fact that thig has been a wonderful year for fast harness work in America. The most startling performance of all, perhaps, was that of Prince Alert, the Crown Prince geldingyWho-paced a mile in 1.5 T. This is a clean clip of two seconds from Dan Patch's mark of 1.59. Alert paced his phenomenal mile at th». Empire City track at Yonkers, New York,. on September 23. Weather and track were perfect, and, in common with all this sea-; son's record smashers, Alert travelled be-' hind a thoroughbred speedmaker __rnesse_ to a sulky equipped with a wind shield., The Prince paced the first quarter in 29_s* and shot past the half in 58s. Then: the crowd realised that it was witnessing the fastest mile ever travelled by a harness horse, and cheers and shouts of "Come on"----arose from the grandstand and along the? lawn. Without a break or a tremor Prince* Alert flashed by ■ the three-quarter pole in* 1.261, and, maintaining a great rate off speed, went under the wire ta l-Sp— *; "Referee."- ! ""■ !i

After he won the St. Leger very eaSilyr from several indifferent t__-ee-yea_--oH_ : (none of the French horses ran, and 2_nfandel was not entered), says "Terllnga"' in the "Australasian," admirers of RocK Sand were confident that he would beat Sceptre in the Jockey Club Stakes. They; argued that Rock Sand was not himself when Ard Patrick and Sceptre beat him in the Eclipse Stakes, and that in the final Ten Thousand Pounder Sceptre would hayto allow Rock Sand a special breeding allowance of 91b, as well as ordinary; weight for age. Well, the race for the Jockey Club Stakes took place on October, 1, and the details are given in the "Asian.'" Sceptre carried 10.0 to Rock Saflas' 8-_OV and the cabled report says she won hi a! canter by four lengths. The betting was very close, 5 to 4 being laid on Rock Sand, and 11 to 10 taken about Sceptre. It i_. very plain now that Sceptre and Ard Patrick are a long way ahead of this ~easoi-_f three-year-olds, and although the best oft his year—excepting, perhaps, ZinrandeJ— >' Rock Sand cannot be a wonder. I see by the same "Asian" that Kano, by Trenton* was only beaten a head in the Princei Edward Handicap, of £2000, run on Sep" tember 26. Kano just previously won the* Royal Borough Handicap of £500 at Ayr.. There may yet be time for Trenton to sir* a good horse in England, but so far his career in the Old Country has been very disappointing. ■

The following Story is told in a! Queens land paper:—"We have all heard of horses and jockeys being 'tied up,' but it is a de--cided novelty to find that.even punters carf be .blocked from 'trying.' It happened this way at a pony meeting once held on Charters Towers. A pony named, say, Mandolin, was known to be a certainty whenever he 'spun,' and the gratification of half-a-dozen of the punters was great when the 'director' of Mandolin, a pencnltrtjF by the way, approached them each nndp-| the seal of strict secrecy and remarked! •Mandolin's in two races on Saturday; he'f dead in the first, and will win the seconrt; lei him go in the first, but bung it in quids in the second when I nod: here's a fiver,, put it on for me and baTe a bit on your* self.' Mandolin appeared in the first race, aud, opening at 0 to 4, was steadily backed down to ('• to 4 on. Not by the punters.though.- tbey backed 'the next best,' an« smiled as tbey reflected how 'the mngati 1 ' were 'falling in' over Mandolin. At lengtK the ponies faced the starter, and Mandolin led from end to end. The 'director' collected about a centur/ from the books, scratched Mandolin promptly for the second event, and then went round to his com* missioner friends for the return of his fivers. 'You're a beautiful take-down,' they indignantly remarked. 'Don't be cross,' _» coolly replied; 'if 1 hadn't tied yon puntert up I couldn't have got a tenner about hl»| it grieved me, but it had to be done*' H>*

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19031114.2.40.21

Bibliographic details

THE.... Racing World., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 272, 14 November 1903, Supplement

Word Count
2,662

THE.... Racing World. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 272, 14 November 1903, Supplement

Working