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TRADE AND LABOUR NOTES.

(By Industrial Tramp-)

Very breezy meeting of the Trades and Labour Council last Wednesday.

The Labour Day demonstration posters are now being distributed in the town and-suburbs, and from present indications Labour Day ought to be as great a success this year as it .was last. Trade in the building line is very brisk at present, and looks as though it will remain so for some time to come. Carpenters are in good demand just now, and there are few first-class men out of work- - "Sunday trams" is the burning question at present, and the result'of the poll ■will be awaited anxiously by the various unions. The Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners is one of the largest benefit societies in the world. Its members number 70,000, and it has branches In every, Engjfoh-epeaking! country. The furniture trade is fairly brisk, and has every .indication of being more so is the season advances. Tiie plumbing trade at the present time is rather slack, but with the advancement of the building trade and the new sanitary by-laws' of the city, has every promise of being very brisk during the coming season. The district secretary of the North Auckland Timber Workers , Union, Mr F. W. Phillips, has been paying a visit to the various country mills, and reports a substantial increase in th<> membership of the union, which has now close on 1000 members, European and Maori. The timber industry still keeps very brisk, new mills being erected in the country south of Auckland, noticeably a large mill for Messrs Ellis and Burnand nf Mangapeehi. This firm has secured the thnber rights of a totara and rinra bush in the district. The tug-o'-war team of the timber union, which won the cup last year at the Labour Day carnival, are now in training for the coming event, which promises to result in a good contest. The energetic firm of L.0.8. are at the present time erecting a plant for another mill on the reclamation at Mechanics' Bay. Shipbuilding, though tor a long time practically at 9 standstill, is now very busy, and the hum of the shipwright's mailet can be heard in the various yards. For some time past there has been a shortage of bricks owing to repairs being made to the brick kilnfi at Avondale; these, are now nearly completed, and the brickmakr.rs will be at full swing at an early date. At a meeting of the Bootmakers' Union, - held to discuss the new industrial agreement entered into by this trade, the men expressed 'themselves as being satisfied with it. Tli deadlock which existed in the flour-milling indnstry is likely to be amieablv settled.

The Engine-drivers' Union is sending two representatives-1"& Waihi to consult with the local members in reference to bringing the Waihi Goldmining Company under the engine-drivers' award. The Amalgamated Society of Engineers at the present time is serioush considering a new working statement to lay before the employers.

The Auckland Cooks and .Waiters' Union is showing itself to be an energetic body in the interests of its members, which now number close on 200.

The steel work for the bridge over the Rahgitikei River, at Mangaweka, which has been made at Ohristchurph. is ready to be put into position, and is to be shipped from Lyttelton to the site of the work at once.

Some extraordinary evidence as to huge pYofits made in the gunsmith business came out at an inquiry which was hdld sit Westminster recently. The case was a claim for compensation in: respect to the premises and business of a gunsmith, named Andrews, Avhich the South-Eastern Railway Company are acquiring. The claimant said that <m many of the articles he sold he made 200 per cent, profit. The profit was even greater in some cases. An article known as the "Simplex Wind Gauge" cost him 9/; the sale was .£2 14/. This Avas 500 per cent, profit. On .gunpowder he made an average of 200 per cent., and on certain articles with a small turnover he had made SOO per cent.

Mr Wm. Evans, managing director of the Atlas Milliner Company. Timaru, writing to the "Asliburtcn Mail" on the public weighbridge question, says his expe-ience has boen that railway weights cannot be relied on. The Department, as a rule, no man specially appointed to do the weighing,, and sometimes men are allowed to weigh who are quite incompetent for the work Again, the weight of the trucks varies very much in fine and wet weather, and very often the scales are out of order, and inaccurate. This beinec so, most merchants have; scales of their own, but, if not attended to with a man specially toid off to do the weighing, as an expert, the weight may still be unreliable, and should be checked by the threshing , machine •weights. The farmers have this matter in their own hands, if they can arrange to have their thresVng done by day labour instead of by contract. Bay labour may o{.-at a little extra, but, in the end, it will pay the farmer better than contract work, as he can be sure of his weights when he pnpervises the weighing himself.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19030930.2.24

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 233, 30 September 1903

Word Count
868

TRADE AND LABOUR NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 233, 30 September 1903

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