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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1903. THE MUNICIPAL ELECTION TO-MORROW.

The City Oounoil election, which takes place to-morrow, is an event of quite exceptional importance to Auckland. For the first • time in its history, our municipal rulers are to be chosen as representatives of the whole city, and not of any one section of it 'We have, on other occasions, pointed to the great benefits that should be conferred upon us through the abolition of the wards, and it now remains for the ratepayers to take full advantage of the opportunities afforded them by the change. Of the twenty candidates who have come forward, twelve only can be elected. But it should be possible from this list of twenty to select twelve men sufficiently qualified by experience of public affairs and by personal capacity to undertake the control of this city. Without referring to individual candidates, we may remind the ratepayers that members of the old Council, which abolished tie ward system have, to some extent, a claim upon our recognition. In the public interest they sacrificed their seats, and it would seem only fair that the majority of' those responsible for this step should have an opportunity of administering the city under the new regime. But certainly the faot tha/t a candidate is an ex-councillor must not be allowed to outweigh all other considerations. As the Council is bow reduced from fifteen to twelve members, it will be necessary to reject of these gentlemen, and we trust that the citizens of Auckland will make their selection with due regard to the heavy responsibilities and important duties now entailed upon our City Councillors.

It may seem superfluous to warn our readers that some care is necessary in voting if they wish to exercise their right to the best advantage. But, unfortunately, every election, Parliamentary or municipal, reveals the fact that the majority of people have a very rudimentary notion of the process to be followed in recording a vote. In this case, as there are twelve candidates, each elector has twelve votes, and we must impress upon all and sundry that anyone who votes for more than twelve candidates invalidates --- the whole of his ballot-paper and loses all his votes. The percentage of people who can be absolutely depended upon to count twelve names correctly in the flurry of a polling booth is not so great as /might reasonably - be expected; and considering the number of candidates we recommend the ratepayers to be particularly careful in this respect. At the same time we hope that none of the electors will be so shortsighted as to vote for less than twelve members. The practice of plumping should be severely discountenanced, as it not only produces results that in no sense indicate the popular will, but it means that those who indulge in it deliberately throw away a large part of their electora! rights. Tne only way in which ratepayers can do justice to the requirements of the city and their own personal interests is by voting each for no more and no less than twelve candidates, j There is another aspect of our muni cipal elections which we would 'prefer, if it were possible, to ignore. But we cannot close our ears to the rumours of irregularities at past elections, or our eyes to the danger that a keenlycontested struggle always threatens to the integrity of the popular franchise. "Roll-stuffing" and "repeating" are not so familiar to us as to certain other democratic communities. But it would be idle to pretend that instances of such abuses have not occurred in this colony., and we understand tfhat precautions are to be taken jto guard against them here and now. After the election the returning officer will forward to the Town Clerk a list of the votes recorded, and the Mayor intends that great care

shall be exercised i» checking the lists, d that offenders who have voted at more tfcm one polling-booth, or who have impersonated electors who are known t° be dead or absent > wiU be proceeded against as the law provides. It is to be hoped that this warning will be sufficient to protect the reputation of the city and the rights of the people at the forthcoming poll.

But, fl-fter all, the greatest danger to the city at every election lies not in the dishonesty of a few unscrupulous men, but in the apathy and inertness of the mass of the citizens themselves. It is ni) exaggeration to say that no election ever takes place in the colony at whifh 'every elector exercises his full poitical or civic rights. No matter what the public emergency may bethere are always large numbers of men and wonen who, through sheer laziness or a stlfish love of their 1 own ease, refuse to take even the small amount of trouble required to make up their minds about jandidates and to record their votes. To neglect the simple and obvious ttsk of voting at public elections should be regarded as a dereliction of duty to any self-respecting citizen, and till it is so regarded neither city ncr colony has any right to complain (f misgovernment. We appeal, therefore, to our readers to make every effort jo exercise their electoral rights at Welnesday's poll, and to bring all reasonable pressure to bear upon their fellow-dtizens to encourage them to do the same. Moreover, as we have said, qiite apart from the public duty that ataches to all such elections, the choice if this City Council is a matter of exce]tional importance to Auckland, The successful administration of the city unier the new system will demand all the practical ability that we can compresi into the Council, .and the need for expensive municipal and sanitary works vill tax our resources to the utmost. Already the expenditure on the city has reached a point which has suggested ;o many public men the necessity for increasing the rates, and without dv« regard to economy some such step miy yet have to be taken. Perhaps, ifter all, human nature being what il is, we cannot give our readers a better reason for taking a deep and active interest in this election than the danger that they may yet have to pay out of their own pockets for their past neglect of municipal affairs. But whatever view the electors may take of this contingency, we hope that they will one and all exercise their rights to-morrow to the best advantage of 'the city, by choosing representatives who can be trusted to maintain the dignity of their office, while guarding the interests and promoting the prosperity of the whole city.

___ .o_-~rtag-- -•__•—G»pUm MWo weather forecast for 24 hours from 9 a.m. this day:—"Gale after 16 hours from now from between north-east and north and west. Glass -fall. Expect rain."

In reply to a cable from Mr Seddon, word has been received that New Zealand live stock is now admitted into Argentine.

The Premier recently communicated with the Imperial Government expressing surprise at the change of port of departure from Lyttelton to Hobart of the Antarctic relief expedition. The reply, given through the Agent General, is that Hobart lies 1200 miles nearer than Lyttelton to England, whereas Lyttelton is only 150 miles nearer than Hobart to the Discovery, and Czer 1000 mile* would thus be saved by the change, meaning a week in point of time, and time is of the utmost importance.

Mr H. W. Brabant, S.M., had a light task at the Police Court this morning, only a few unimportant cases coming before him. Swen Adolph Carlsson admitted being drunk and disorderly in Karan_*ahape-road yesterday, his frolic taking the form of attempts to embrace ladies whom he met. He was fined £ 1 and costs. Harry Davies was ordered to pay 3/6 weekly and Robert Davies 1/6 weekly, towards the maintenance of their mother, Annie Davies. Hi 3 Worship deals with owners of unregistered dogs this afternoon.

They that go down to the city in trams during the dry season know to their sorrow that there is much dust on Auckland streets; the which is unduly disturbed by the rapid passage of the electric trams and the action of the useful "slipper" brake. The nuisance is particularly bad in the residential suburb of'Parnell, and with the approach of summer the local Borough Council has resolved to take steps to 'Hay" the dust-fiend so far'as it can. The Mayor of Parnell (Mr. J. Fitt) broached the subject at Ids council's meeting last night, and said that he had spoken to the managing director of the Tramway Company about it. The latter had pointed out that the company was not responsible, but he would get estimates of the cost of running wateringcars over the rails, to submit to the council. In the discussion which, followed a proposal was made that the Mayors of the City, Parnell, Newmarket and Grey Lynn should confer on the matter, and evolve a cheap method cf watering the streets. The" resolution eventually reached was, however, that Mr. Hansen should be requested to draw up an estimate of the cost of such a watering service as was required.

The extraordinary activity in the building trade in Christchurch continues unabated. During the month of August 110 buildingi permits were issued. The value of the buildings was £45*370* and the fees amounted to £129 5/. Besides the building permits, 75 permits were issued for other purposes.

The Otago Employers' Association has nominated Mr Wm. Scott, one of its vice-presidents, and a member of the local Conciliation Board, as deputy-mem-ber of the Arbitration Court during the absence of Mr S. Brown.

Very considerable interest was taken in the polling on the proposal of the Nelson City Council to raise a loan of £ 55,000 for a complete drainage scheme. The result was 431 for and 550 against, so the proposal was rejected by a majority of 119,

From the majestic snow-cavered Southern Alps to the pretty little stream that trinkles by the roadside on the way from Ngaruawahia to Waingaro is a far cry, and the golf championship of * the colony at Napier, (won by a full-blooded Maori in spite of the fact that some of his opponents had learned their golf at St. Andrew's), and the horticultural show in Auckland, are not very intimately connected; still they are all focussed in this week's "Graphic," which is one of the most varied issued. for a long time. Beautiful pictures of beautiful scenery are scattered through its pages, and the events of importance that have occurred in various parts of the colony since the last issue are pictorially represented, and "People Talked About" contains several photos of interest, including one of the Rev. J. M. Marshall, who disappeared so mysteriously from Christchurch.

Professor Marshall, brother of the Rev. J. M. Marshall, the missing man, went to Dunedin to see Mr Milne, who said he saw the Rev. J. M. Marshall in the streets there. The professor has •telegraphed to the Christchurch police as follows: —"Mr Milne is positive he saw.my brother on Saturday, the sth." Mr Milne was a pupil of the missing roan, and knew him very well.

Another link has parted in the chain of the old history of Samoa, by the death of Seumanutafa, the late Chief of Apia, who joined the great majority on Monday morning last. Seumanutafa (says the Samoa paper) was certainly the best known native personality to Europeans and Americans who have from time to time visited these islands. His well-known hospitality commended him to everyone, and he always used his best efforts to bring about peace in times of trouble. Although he always advocated peace, and disliked 'fighting, he was prominent when warfare was considered necessary. He held the title Seumanutafa for about 30 years, and at the time of his death was upwards of sixty years of age. One of the most notable events of his life was his action towards the naval forces here during the disastrous hurricane of 1889; recognition of which was made by the United States Government.

In the case of Robert Hope McCallum, charged with wilfully permitting the use of a house owned by him in Abercrom-bie-street as a brothel, reported in yesterday's issue, Mr H. W. Brabant, S.M., reserved his decision in order to consult his notes.

On Saturday next the match for the prize presented by the captain of the Auckland Golf Club will be played' at the Cornwall links. The match, which is a handicap one, play, is for one round, and is into two classes according to handicap, i Players are to choose -their own partners and there will be post en-tries.

At a meeting of the Executive of the National Council of Women resolutions were passed as follows:—"That the time has arrived to remove all legal disqualifications on illegitimate children; that the State should make generous provision for the maintenance, supervision and education of such children, the parents being compelled to contribute to their support according to their means; that when paternity is proved such children should possess equal legal status with those born in wedlock, being regisered in flic father's name; that the Government be urged to establish homes for illogfitirna-a d.o_tituto ohi-dron." - 111 the evening addresses were given on the temperance question.

The new launch built by Messrs. Logan Bros, for the Government Tourist Department for the tourist traffic on Lake Waikaremoana, Hawke's Bay, was launched during last week. On Sunday morning a party consisting of Mr T. E. Donne, Superintendent of the Tourist Department, and Capt. Bolons of the Government steamer Hinemoa, made a run down the harbourln the vessel, which covered the • distance between the Railway Wharf and St. Helier's Bay in the good time of 20 minutes. From St. Helier's the party proceeded to Home Bay, Motutapu, and arrived back in town before one o'clock. In the afternoon again the boat was given a trial spin to St. Helier's Bay. The average speed developed on the trials was 8_ knots per hour. Mr Donne expressed himself as being more than satisfied with the* launch, and stated that the department anticipated placing several other boats on tbe lake shortly. The launch, which is constructed on the whaleboat type, presents a very fine appearance in the water. Her length overall is 35ft., beam Bft., and draught of water 2.6 feet. She is diagonally built, and is fitted up in firstclass style. *__ roomy cockpit aft is fitted with seats comfortably upholstered, and which provide accommodation for about 40 people. The machinery is situated amidships, and consists of a 10 h.p. Union oil engine. An awning runs nearly the whole length of the vessel.

Mr. Ernest H. Littlejohn, c.o. Messrs. W. and G. Turnbull & Co., Commerce street, reports the sale during the week of the following businesses: His Majesty's Cafe, to Mrs. Hendry, of "Okareta," Symonds street; A. R. Lussich's fruit and genercl store, Ponsonby, to Mr. P. Dignam of Perth, Western Australia^

The anniversary of the dedication of St. Mary's Cathedral, Parnell, will be celebrated to-morrow by an organ recital in the Cathedral. An address will be given by His Lordship Bishop Neligan. An interesting debate will take place at the University College on Thursday evening next, when the University College and Athenaeum Debating Societies will oppose one another on the subject, "Is Trades Unionism Beneficial to the Community?" The College representatives are Messrs. M. Walker, J. Stanton, 'and F. Sinclaire, and the Athenaeum representatives Messrs. Buddie, Wilding and Hill. Take the car to our store if you want the best value in house furnishings.— Simonds and Spragg, Newton.—Ad. Teeth fitted without a plate by a specialist in crown and bridge work at London Dental Institute's new premises, opposite His Majesty's Arcade,— Ad. Duchess pairs, wardrobes, chests, and general bedroom furnishings, very cheap. Great variety.—Simmonds and Spragg, Newton. —Ad. There, are at the present moment in France 200,000 houses which have no windows, because there is still a window and door tax in that enlightened country. We doubt if there are 20 houses in Auckland without a regular supply of Arthur Nathan's Reliable tea. It is delicious. —Ad. They are here! The nicest in boyp" clothing of all kinds. —At Geo. Fowids'. Selling at cost price,—Ad.

Mr F. E. B&ume, M.HJR. (chairman of the Educational Committee of the House of Representatives), in. company with Mr George George (Director of Technical, Education), paid a visit to the Newton Manual Training School this morning. Mr Baume expressed himself as being very pleased with the work, both of the girls in the cookery department, and of the boys in the woodwork department.

A deputation from the Birkenhead and - Northeote branch of the general committee appointed in connection with the Veterans' Home waited upon the Fruitgrowers' Association at Birkenhead iast evening. Mr Bruce explained that a strawberry stall would be one of the chief attractions of tha bazaar in December, and they wanted the co-operation of the fruitgrowers to supply one hundred and fifty strawberry boxes daily for the five days on which the bazaar would be held. Mr Parrish, speaking on behalf of the Association, said that no doubt the growers would do all they could to supply the number required. A resolution was passed urging members to do all they can to make tbe Birkenhead a__ North_ote strawberry stall at the forthcoming bazaar a success. In continuation of the anniversary services of the Grafton-road Methodist Church a tea and public meeting will be held in the schoolroom this evening. The programme will be found in another column. They are here! The newest in men's suits and trousers; new lines in working shirts and flannels now to hand.— At Geo. Fowlds'. —Ad. Tonson Garb'ck Company, Ltd.: See our window for a beautiful display of linen and cotton household requirements, including quilts, towels, sheetings, toilet covers, etc. We make a specialty of furnishing Manchester goods. — Ad. They are _.ere! The very newest lines in gentlemen's underwear; all the best makes to hand.—At Geo. Fowlds'. —Ad. ' They are here! The very neatfcjt and nobbiest in ties; all the newest styles just arrived.—At Geo. Fowlds'.—Ad. They are here! The latest in hats of every description—Panamas, straws, soft and hard felts.—At, Geo. Fowlds'. —Ad.

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Bibliographic details

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1903. THE MUNICIPAL ELECTION TO-MORROW., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 220, 15 September 1903

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1903. THE MUNICIPAL ELECTION TO-MORROW. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 220, 15 September 1903

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