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THE RACING WORLD.

£3" Further racing matter will be found In our Supplement.

Dolores has joined Kos Beaton's team

Durbar and Peri Hnon have gone into C, Piper's stable at Riccarton.

The trotting pony Polly 11. was shipped to Sydney a few weeks back.

Mr H H Hayr leaves on a visit to Sydney, Melbourne, and West Australia next .week.

Occidental was taken to Sydney by a recent boat, and his owner, W. Forbes, accompanied him.

Fit and well Evening Wonder would run a good race in the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race with 10.9 on his back.

Strathavon is being given a spell at his old quarters at Otahuhu, though he will rejoin Rae's team at Green lane after a time.

Tresham received 11.7 in the York Hurdle Race, run on June Bth, at the V.R.C. Birthday Meeting. Colonel Shilinski was awarded 13st.

Bundook, half brother to Seahorse,.has a number of yearlings representing him in the lists of entries for coming events in Australia.

The Nurses' Flutter and Medical Mile •were the names of two events at the Forbes (New South Wales) Hospital races won by one horse.

Hunting has been going on this week in the Pukekohe district, where the Pakurnnga Hounds are annually taken. A good time was experienced.

Wairiki is being exercised in the vicinity of Onehunga, and is 111 excellent condition and health at the present time. There aie backers for the colt for the N.Z. Cup at hundreds to six.

It is considered thafcsix months will elapse before Cannongate is fit to resume work a~ain from which it is evidently intended that he is to be given a good chance of maUing a complete recovery.

The tracks are heavy at headquarters just now, but still a few horses are being worked there for coming events in which they aie already engaged, and others in which they are liKely to be placed later on.

Mark Thompson, who was recently disqualified br the A.J.C. stewards, has given notice of his intention to appeal against the two years' disqualification imposed on him on the 30th ultimo at Randwick.

Reallr some one should see to It that horses should not be allowed to compete in similar colours at Ellerslie, as was the case at the last meeting held theie. iThree in one race is coming it strong.

Golden Rose is in great heart just now, nnd Is very playful at exercise. I don t know that Mr Lynch seriously contemplates running the daughter of St. Leger in the New Zealand Cup, but she is wintering well.

Mr Dan O'Brien has nominated his bay yearling colt, by Grafton from Graffin, for the V.R.C. Derby of 1904, and St. Leger of 1905 and for the same events the Hotchkiss —Formo colt, in Frank Macmanemin s stable, has been also engaged.

Mr H. Hayr gave a birthday dinner and dance on Thursday night in the Federal Hall, at which 116 relatives and friends were present. A- number of Mr Hayr's sporting friends intend giving him a return.

Mr E A. Brodrib, who made a lot of money out of mining in Victoria, and lost most of it racing there, died in London recently. He paid 4000 guineas for Titan, the highest priced gelding known at tnat time, and must have lost a small fortune over that purchase alone.

While Mr Byron Moore, the well known secretary of the Victoria. Racing Club, was proceeding in a cab near to the racecourse, on June 9th, the driver of the vehicle fell off the seat, siad was picked up dead. According to a sydney exchange, he had suffered from heft.-: disease.

Mr John ■ Marshall always treats his trainers and jockejs well. When they win they invariably get the best part of the stakes. Higgins, who rode Cannongate, was, I venture to say, the best paid horseman who figured at the North New Zealand Grand National meeting.

The work of the new handieapper, Mr Menzies, for the Victoria Racing Club, is said to have been put to the test and stood It well. Two owners complained of the treatment of their horses, and one of them, Mr W. A. Filgate, published some stronglyworded comments on his work before the meeting.

Referring to the victory In the Princess May Handicap, of Australia, by GossoonTrieste, who was for a time favourite for the last Doncaster Handicap, a writer mentions that the six furlongs was covered in 1.14 J. The Gossoon s have earned a name for "unreliability, though they are exceptionally brilliant.

Miner, one of the English-bred colts Imported to New South Wales by Mr H. C. White, was running on well at the end of the A.J.C. Nursery Handicap at the recent meeting, but his stable companion, Green Mountain, shaped badly in the same event. Both were giving away several months in age to the Australian runners. f

' On May 23, 1803, or just a hundred years ago, it is recorded that a three miles trotting match took place on Sunbury Common between a horse and a mare, belonging to local gentlemen. The horse performed the journey in 9m, and the mare came ■home close behind him; both animals were celebrated trotters at that time.

The Wellington Racing Club have increased the value of each of their four classic races—the Wellesley Stakes and Wellington Stakes, which are run for in the spring of 1905, and the North Island Challenge Stakes and New Zealand St. Legpr Stakes in the autumn, 390G, each event being worth 400 soys. The date of closing is June 30th.

Lord Carbine dropped dead on 30th April, while exercising at Lambourn. The colt was a four-year-old by Carbine out of Leap Frog. He was only out once as a two-year-old, then running unplaced to Torrent. Last year the colt won four out of ten races, including the Lewes Handicap at the August meeting, while he .«lso captured the valuable Grand Prix d'Ostende in July, beating nine opponents handsomely.

According to the London "Sportsman," Rock Sand, who won the Derby at Epsom, does not gallop until he is compelled to. In the Two Thousand Guineas he had at one part of the race to be driven, but when he got going he simply played with the field, winning very easily by a length and a half from Flotsam, with Rabelais two lengths away. This victory, which was his seventh out of eight starts, brought Rock Sand's winnings in stakes up to 12 ; 27450v5.

The Peel Handicap, at Newmarket, on April 30, was run twice. There were 12 starters for the original race, Renzo winning by a head, with Set Fair second. An objection having beeu made that the race was run the wrong distance, the stewaids of the Jockey Club ordered the race to be run again after the last race. The stewaids lined the judge £20 for going to the wrong winning post. On the second occasion there were only five starters, and Set Fair beat lienzo by a head.

The entries for the Caulfield Cup number 163, and for the Melbourne Cup 109, therefore there are 27,5-17 different combinations, each of which may be the winning double. The principle of handicapping is to equalise the chances of all horses engaged in a vace. If all possessed equal chances in the two cups, the legitimate odds against picking the double would be 27,546 to >. With this word of encouragement (says the writer "Javelin"), punters ought to sail in confidently!

One of the late Mr A. Bucklaad's horses, Smike, was a most ungenerous horse on the racecourse, and frequently bolted off the course, yet on one occasion after he had changed hands he was yoked up by mistake and driven home from a race meeting in a dog cart, containing a number of convivial souls, who thought they were driving their own horse, and though he had never been in harness in his life, did not cause any damage; in fact, the occupants were all taken home safely, but when an hour or two later they became aware of the fact that they had been sitting behind the Bolter Smike, whose first time it was in harness, they shook hands with themselves over what they took to be a providential escape.

Though the Hawke's Bay acceptances, so far as the chief races, are not so satisfactory as could have been desired, owing to various causes, a number of horses having gone wrong, still there is material left for interesting contests, if the runners experience ordinary luck. Meteor's weight in the hurdle iace, as previously stated in these columns, is 9.9, not 9.0, as was at first telegraphed. That event should be an interesting one, if Kahuwal, Meteor, and Merryboy are seen at their best. The big Steeplechase looks open. I have a fancy that The Gryphon will give a good account of himself, but Jack o' Lantern, on his best form, would take a lot of beating. He, however, hurt himself at Wanganui, and may not be seen dressed at his best. ' .

Mr E. Knight, better known to sportsmen as "Teddy" Knight, passed through Auckland yesterday on his way to San Francisco, where he purposes remaining a week or two, going through America and on to South Africa, and probably to England, before returning to Sydney. Mr Knight, in addition to having been a prominent owner of racehorses In .New Routn Wales for many years, always took a great interest in shooting, and though not a success at the traps, could give points to many of the cracks in the open field. Mr Knight tried hard to persuade Mr Gorrick, the New South Wales pigeon shot, to accompany him to America, but the notice was all too short. A number of Auckland sporting friends were present to wish Mr Knight bon voyage on the departure of the Sonoma.

The following from the "Sydney Mail" is not without interest to New Zealanders: — Some time back Mr H. C. White sent a Ha-vilah-bred filly named Brown Pearl to England to be mated with St. Simon, but failing to get a subscription to the champion sire he sent hereto Orifiamb, and by last mail he learned that the mare had foaled a line bay colt. Brown Pearl is by imported Yardley (11)— son of Sterling (12)— from the Oaks winner Pearlshell—a sister to Industry, the dam of Gaulus and The Grafter. She Is by Musket from Pearl Ash (imp.), by Lord Clifden Orifiamb is a half brother to no less a celebrity than Lord Rosebery's Derby winner Ladas. He is by Bend Or (1;— grandson of Stockwell—from llluminata (1), by Rosicrucian. from Paraffin, by Blair Athol, sen of Stockwell. Oriflainb was not a performer of note, but at the stud he s'.red winners, among them Flambard, the winner of the Duchess of York Stakes.

The King is expected to nominate some of his horses for the World's Fair Handicap, and an American writer says that His Majesty, after instructing Marsh, his trainer, to report on the material in hand, learned that there were already in sight enough good horses to make a redoubtable string a certainty, and that with the son of Persimmon, the first horse that ever carried King Edward's colours to victory in a Derby, he thought he could guarantee to win the World's Fair Handicap. The information was highly gratifying to the Royal sportsman. According to Marsh, he expressed the liveliest satisfaction, and announced his willingness to spend any amount of money so that on his first appearance in America as a candidate for turf honours he should iriake a worthy showing. Marsh was ordered to gradually get things in shape for the proposed invasion, and to concentrate attention on the training of all promising youngsters now at Sandringham." W. W. Naughton, the Sydney "Referee" correspondent, referring to this, snys: "Worded as it is, and coming in the shape it does, the above sounds like the iridescent dream of a dilapidated dope fiend. Still, there may be a glimmer of probability in it. If 80, something with an official swing to it should be heard shortly."

I notice that some of my confreres continue to Inform their readers that Traducer was at one time so little thought of that his services eoulrl be obtained for the small sum of 5/. This is nil moonshine. Traducer was always highly thought of, and at the time he was supposed to be Isolated and in a district serving Maori mares, he was in reality being patronised by the best known breeders about Wangannl, whose mares, though not all stud book mares, were nevertheless descended from the best imported stock, and niii" out of every ten of his pets conld race well, either on the flat, over hurdles, or across country. It was the successes of his stock in the South that save him a name before lie -was secured by Mr L. Daniels and Mr J. Walker for the Aramoho Stud, and caused him to be so well patronised. I could mention scores of mares that visited Traducer while at Wanganui, and many were sent from Ion? distances to visit him, so much was lie In favour with breeders. It was later on In life that the son of The Libel was assessed at his true value, however, and was repurchased to return to Canterbury, where he ended his days. It would come to those who had to foot the bills as strange reading to be told that Traducer's services were ever obtained by anyone for the matter of a few shillings. Wanganui breeders were never asked big prices for tile services of any thoroughbred horses that I can remember standing in the district; but there were a few sires that came after Traducer whose owners charged more than the late Mr John Walker charged for Traducer, Ravensworth, and other good sires that enthusiast had in his stud nt old Aramoho during his long residence there. Recently I met Mr Clark, secretary to the Rotorua Jockey Club, and one of the stewards, from whom I learned that the club will endeavour to hold a two days' meeting in the autumn at carnival time there, increasing the prizes very materially, giving on each day a decent stake. It Is intended to put in some work on the course, as there seems little chance of the Government taking the ground at present for town extension purposes. The soil is so light that little can be done at short notice, ;>:it the main thing is to keep the grass growing and solidify the track by the frequent use after heavy rains of a good roller, when no one would object to race on it. The natives intend to do their share towards the next big carnival, from what I can hear, and so that there will not be a recurrence of such a thing as war canoes being pitted against a racing canoe, are building five large war canoes of similar dimensions r .o be ready in time for the next big demonstration on the placid waters of the Lake, while the flotilla is otherwise to be increased aatl improved upon. A novelty will be a sailing race, the sails being made of raupo, as they were made before the days of Captain Cook. If the Carnival Committee and the i acing powers, which are linked hand In hand, work matters judiciously, carnival week at Rotorua will be a time to look forward to and to be remembered by all who luvo the go*d luck to see it. There is no part of the wcrld where the people can run such a show as can the people of the Wonderland of New Zealand, and as a matter of good, sound business the Government and the people who are deriving most profit from the tourist trade should subsidise both carnival and racing Institutions liberally. If the next

race programme is made as attractive as I anticipate) tliere is sure to be a. successful gathering and strong support from owners. Last meeting there was a lack in tlie number of the competing horses, out as related by me at tlie time, such serviceable horses as Nuuiii, Green and Gold, Miss Lottie, and Meteor were amongst the numbers, and these horses have ail won siu;:2, in Town Hall society.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19030620.2.40

Bibliographic details

THE RACING WORLD., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 146, 20 June 1903

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2,726

THE RACING WORLD. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 146, 20 June 1903

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