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THE Racing World.

By " "Whalebona."

Many people went to Sandown Park, says the "Age." especially to see the Grafton gelding Famous running the Sandown Welter Plate. There has been a great deal of talk lately about Famous1 chance in the Newmarket Handicap, and evidently several who nominated for Wednesday's race have been influenced by it, as only two of the 20 coloured on the card to oppose Mr S. Fielder's horse entered an appearance. Odd of 5 to 1 were laid on Famous beating Arta and Catchlock, and during what was nothing more than a working gallop, the odds were never in doubt. The favourite pulled up well, and will probably be much benefited by the gallop and a few more races in public before he is called upon to run in the Newmarket Handicap. Famous is a very nice horse to look at — jest the sort to attract the sovereign of the maD "Who likes to back a horse on his appearance—and he is undoubtedly a galloper of high order. He has already beet well backed for the Newmarket Hand., and if he makes a good show in the Sixth Caulfield Futurity Stakes, he is likely to see a short price for the big Flemlugton sprint race.

Referring to Wakeful's defeat in the St. George's Stakes at th.-j recent Vietoiia Amateur Turf Club's Meeting, the Melbourne correspondent of "Town and Country"' says:—"The great boil-over of the day was, of course, in the St. George's Stakes, which most people naturally regarded as a gift for Wakeful. This grand little mare nevertheless is not a machine, and even if she were it must not be forgotten that machines wear out in time. She was beaten on her merits on Saturday, but there wafe no disgrace attaching to the defeat, and sho may be going gradually down the hill, like aIJ things of this earth, or she may only want sharpening up with a public gallop or two just to reassert Herself as she has done befoie. Footbolt's friends allowed him to run loose, and save for a few fancy shots. 20's were freely on offer about his chance. Some money changed hands over Killua, Famous, and The Victory, but Wakeful's price was prohibitive to the great majority of backers, so the ringmen did not benefit much by her defeat. Pootbolt is a very brilliant horse when thoroughly well, and he evidently was thoroughly well on Saturday, because he beat the gamp little marp almost as if she were a second-rater. Famous ran badly, and the journey seemed rather far for him,"

This is Captain Heber Percy's account of the Kyang or wild horse of Tibet, an animal cordially hated of sportsmen who visit the high plateaux of that country:—"The kyang was doubtless originally intended by Providence to fulfil some good purpose, but having turned out a failure was located In Tibet, where it was probably considered it would not be much in the way.

Thp kyanjr has nothing to excuse or recommend it; It is an ugly donkeyfiea, fiddle headed brute, with straight shoulders; In colour it is a mealy bay with a dam brown hog mane, dorsal stripe, and tall. Its head and ears are coarse and large, and Its screeching bray is as unpleasant as its general appearance. Being absolutely worthless to shoot, it is nlwnys trnding upon that fact, and on the utterly false pre tence that it is deeply interested in human beings, particularly Europeans, is for ever thrusting itself into society where it is not welcome, thereby spoiling the sportsman's chance of shooting the animal he wants, the shapoo or wild sheep As soon as he thinks it has got a sportsman's temper thoroughly roused, it will scour the country round for all its friends and relations, and assemble them together to enjoy the interesting spectacle of an angry man armea with a rifle wh>h he dare not discharge at them for fear of alarming something worth i firing at (the wild sheep)."

His Majesty the King has now in training eighteen horses, which are under the charge of Mr Richard Marsh, at Egrrtou House, Newmarket, nfarsh does not train for the King alone, his other patrons being Lord Wolverton, Mr J. W. Larnach, and Mr Arthur James, all three being members of the Jockey Club; and he also has a few horses of his own. At Sauflriusuam His Majesty has sixteen brood, raaroy rind a number of foals and yearlings, the steeplechaser Ambush 11., winner of the Grand National Steeplechase iv ISOO, ti stable companion to lead him in work, and the famous Derby winners Persimmon (IS9C) and Diamond Jubilee (1900). The former, whose subscription for the season is full, is standing at 300 guineas. The :.w) Derby winners and the beautiful horse Florizel 11. (also the property of His Majesty, and standing at the Heath House Stnd. Newmarket, at 100 guineas, with a full list) are brothers, being all three by St. Simon from Perdita 11. The purchase of this now famous mare was recommended by that astute trainer John Porter, and nearly all the great success achieved by His Majesty on the turf must be attributed to it. The price paid for the mare was 900 guineas, and what a lucky purchase she proved may be judged by the following resume of her produce and their winnings: —

1888: B.C. Derelict, by Barcaldine, 10 races, 1 win, £182. This colt was sold as a 4-year-old to Mr G. Haughton for -!30 guineas, and died the next season. 1889: B.f. Barracouta, by Barcaldine, 4 races, 1 win, £1064 10/. 1890: Barren. 1891: Br. c Florizel 11., by St. Simon, 22 races, 11 wins, £7858. 1592: Barren. 1893: B.c. Persimmon, by St. Simon, 9 races, 7 wins, £34,----706. 1895: B.f. Azeeza, by Surefoot, 1 race, 1896: Br. c. Sandringham, by St. Simon, did not run, and now at the stud in America. 1897: B.c. Diamond Jubilee, by St. Simon, 16 races, 6 wins, £29,185 10/. 1898: Slipped foal. 1899: B.f. Nadeja, by St. Simon, has not run. The total winnings amount to £72,996. Last season eight winners by Persimmon won 16 races and £36,868, the highest winner being Sceptre, Mr "Bob Sutton"' Sievier's famous mare, but Florizel 11. was low down in the list, owing to the failure of Volodyovski and Doricles to run up to their two and three-year-old form.

Racing in South Africa has more than ordinary interest for us in the colonies, since we are supplying thoroughbreds for that pait of the world. The following interestiug article on racing in the Rand appears in the "Australian," and was written by a correspondent in whom I recognise the hand of a lonir-tirne confiere, no-v# settled in Johannesburg: — "After a cessation of nearly three years, legitimate racing in the Transvaal was resumed by the holdiug of the Johannesburg Turf C)ub"s meeting on December 26, 27 and January 1. Considering the comparatively short iaose of time since the peace proclamation, it is wonderful the number of horses that were drawn together from different countries. Australia had quite its fair shave, lnix 'he outcome did not discover many winners from the Commonwealth division. When it is boine in mind, however, that in all the handicaps the Australians were called upon to give away heaps of weight to the others, their lack of success is not remarkable. Though failing in both his efforts, Chcsney stands out as . the star performer at the meeting, showingthat he was rightly appraised the best racei horse in South Africa. I write in the past ' tense, inasmuch as I fear the ship-wrecked warrior's career on the turf has closed, lie pulled up dotty in the big handicap on the first day, notwithstanding which he changed hands at 2000 guineas. His new owne:s foolishly ran him in the Champion Plate, the weight-for-a^e event, on the concluding day. Had the son of Malua and Madcap been himself it would have been far lon.er odds ou his scoring thnn the 2 to 1 which backers had to lay. But a horse confined to his box for a week could not be expected to give anything like a showing, even if he got thiough without a breakdown. The feared eventuality, however, happened a couple of furlongs from home, and, dropnine back, Grasspan and the veteran campaigner Malgo, who has been a South African champion for years, fought out a great

finish, which ended in favour of the AuS' traliau. Malgo, as indicated, had, and has, a big local reputation, having thrice been returned winner of the Johanncsbuig Handicap, on two of the occasions under heavy weights. He is now nine years old, so can hardly be the horse he once was. Even if he were, it would uot be a very meritorious' ppitoriniince on the part of Grasspan to beat him."

Grasspan ran most disappointingly in the chief handicap on the first day. It was therein Ohesney showed his marked superiority over the best in the laud. The race which is endowed to the extent of £1500, and is ran over a severe mile course, brought no fewer than 23 to the post, of whom Lovematch, an English bred 3 year old filly, by Matchmaker — Sweet Laura, a stable companion of Chesney, went out favourite. There was a very large volume of betting on the event. The ring here is a strong one, and they bet in big figures. Before the weights appeared, evea prior to the entries being receired, Cheaney was favourite. The weight of 10.7 assessed did not cause him to lose his place at the head of the quotations, but a fortnight before the day it was given out tnat Lovematch. with her light weight of 6.3, was the oue that Mr Abe Bailey was going to depend on, and the money was then piled on her, while the top weight drifted back to a long price. Tue filly eventually started at 9 to 2, and won comfortably by a iength from Ocean Gem, a 4 year old filly by Pearl Diver, carrying 7.5, with Chesney, not ridden out, galuing third place another length away. The report given currency to that Lovematch represented Cheffney at 9.0 was not borne out !n the running, for there is no doubt he could have been much closer had his rider willed. Chesney's starting price was 33 to 1, and he returned £10 17/ from the place totalisator. Grasspan. 10.0; Cast Iron, 9.2; San Patricia, 8.9; Gunga Din, 8.1; Salus, 7.7; were among the starters. Cast Iron showed a bold front for 6 furlongs, when he faded out of the contest; the others named were never prominent. Mr Bailey and his racing partner, Mr Ben. Curtis, won upwards of £30,000 by the success of Lovematch. When it comes to be considered that the filly, being Bngdish bred, was really a 4 year old when running, her impost, only 31b over the minimum, was a most luxurious one. Gunga Din cut a sorry figure in all his races. Though looking well, he exhibited not the slightest dash. Gunga Dm must be set down as a back number. Cast Iron was every time overburdened with weight, so was San Patricia. The New Zealand filly was actually asked to give some pounds to Grasspan In a six furlong race. The latter did not run. but San Patricia essayed to carry 9.0, and was well backed She did not get into the first three. Besides Grasspan, the only Australian winner was The Wier, by Niagara, who, going out favourite in the Selling Race on the last day. won easily. There were huge attendances each day. The totalisators, which are poorly managed, put through about £60,000. A New Zealand bred pony, Jewel, a stable companion of San Patricia, won a race a? the galloway meeting which followed the J.T.C. gathering.

The death of Ihe Australian Peer, says "Terlinga," recalls recollections of some stirring turf incidents. The Peer came in a remarkably good veac. The best lot of three-year-olds we over had were those that raced in 1877-8. They included First King, Chester, Cap-a-L'i.?. Woodlands. Sava-' naka. Waterfbrd, Amendment, Lockleys, Strathearn, Glenorrniston Pluto, Rapidity, The Dean, Royalty, Black Swan, Pardon, and Device. These were all good, and, 1 think, that next to t'acm the best lot we had were in the Peer's time. They included Abercorn, Carlyon, Australian Peer. Cranbrook, Niagara, Maxim, and Tranter. I have not included Hortense, because she lost her form altogether in the autumn of her two-year-old days, and did not win a race as a three-year-old. Abe.corn won the A.J.C. Derby, for which the Peer ran third, but in the Randwick Plat v Mr Gannon's colt upset the odds of 8 to J. laid on Trident foj the three mile race. As it happened ho beat nothing, as it turned out that Trident had completely lost his'form, and he never won a race afterwards. That Randwick Plate was the cause of trouble outside the griefs of the punters. Hales declared that Gorry, on The Peer, had jambed him on the rails with Trident. Hales lost his temper completely over the incident, and slashed Gorry with his whip after they pulled up. Then he wanted Mr White to protest, but Mr White declined to do so, because The Peer had won so easily that no interference could have altered the result of the race. Gorry, however, was a protege of Mr W, A. Long's at the time, and Mr Lons was very indignant with Hales tor striking his boy, but in the end the whole thing passed off without the stewards taking :i hand. Abercorn went out at even money for the Derby, but he was very sore, and Gorry, getting last run on The Peer, won comfortably, while Abercorn and Niagara dead-heated for second place. I have always thought that with a strong man on him, that fine looking horse Tranter would have won thi3 race for Mr E. Hitchelson, a New Zealand gentleman who had very bad luck with his racing ventures in Victoria. Tranter was just behind tire placed horses, and going very strong, but poor little Hughes had no control over him, and he finished with his head wedged in between Niagara and Abercorn. If his jockey had had the strength to keep Tranter out, I think he would have won. Mr W. E. Dakin, who trained Tranter, did not liko to take Hughes off, because he had ridden the colt in all his work, but he was vying of consumption at the time, and was quite unfit to ride a horse like Tranter. The Australian Peer was third in the Melbourne Cup just in front of Abercorn, and he beat the big chestnut again in the Canterbury Plate, but in March Abercorn was himself again, and getting last run lie romped over The Peer at the finish of the Leger. With the very reasonable weight of 8.6 Australian Peer beat a rather weak field in the Sydney Cup. After that came his weight-for-age battles -with Abercorn. As Mr Joe Thompson put it last weak it was first one and then the other. The one that got last run always won. That -base after Wycombe in the three mile race at Randwick probably made a rogue of The Peer. I did not see that race, but I well remember Mr Thompson describing it to me. His idea was that it might have broken the hearts of both Abercorn and The Peer, but "old Abe" was too bis httarted a fellow to be upset by even thTs cvuel race. He was probably a better horse as a five-year-old than ever he was, and I have always maintained that he wou'd have won 'Bravo's Melbourne Cup uc.dei.his 10 10 if Mr White had not ordered 1. Payten to scratch him after he had cantered in for the Metropolitan with 9.10. Melos, however, would have won that Cup by yu yards, if his jockey bad not lost as on the road. With Melos ridden ns he was Abercorn would probably have won. as in the form he was the.i be Must have been lengths in front of Carbine, who ran 1 second with 10.0, and you could nor br.ng Abercorn, as he was then, back to a horse like Bravo. However, that is another story. After his tremendous gruelling m bjant.r, when Wvcombe won, there is every reason to suppose that The Australian Peer turned snif"v although Mr Gannon always maintained he was never as pood as on the day of his last race. He told me afterward* "I was just saying to myself hell giv* him Abercorn to-day, when suddenly he stopped, and when he came in he was covered in blood." He had broken a blood vessel After the race Wycombe won, The Australiau Peer won the Melbourne Stakes, but he was lucky. If the great lumbering Tradition had not rolled on to Mentor, Mr Wallace's horse would probably hav.e won. On the last day of tbe meeting The Peer cut It very badly in the Canterbury Plate, and Mentor wou easily. There Is no question about The Peer having been a good horse in a good year, but I doubt if he was' as good as either Abercorn or Carlyon. Ac the stud he got fair horses in The Australian Star, Australian, Nobleman, Australian Colours, and Hi 3 Grace,

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Bibliographic details

THE Racing World., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 45, 21 February 1903

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2,903

THE Racing World. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 45, 21 February 1903

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