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THE Racing World.

B* * Wlialebone."

EACING FIXTDEES.

November 29—Waitara R.C. Hack December 1 and 2—Fielding J.C Spring December 26, 29, and January .1 and 2— Auckland R.C. December 10—Otahuhu Trotting Club. December 13—Otahuhu Trotting Club. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. "l.J."—Helen Faucit defeated Achilles on the colt's first start, at the CJ.C. meeting a year ago. Abundance, the V.R.C. Derby -winner, will be eased up until the autumn. The famous Fulham Park stud, in South Australia, is to be offered for sale at the end of this month. Victor, -who was recently sold in Victoria to come to this colony, has been turned out at Warmainbool until after Christmas. Antores, the ex-Aucklander, has sired eight colts and two fillies at Mr J. Allman's establishment at Warwick, Queensland, this season Mr W. Lovett decided not to take his team (Hohoro and Co.) to the Wellington meeting, although he considered that the horses were fairly treated in their respective races. Mr James Beckett, the well known horse owner and metallician, left by Wednesday's steamer to be present at the Wellington R.C meeting yesterday and to-day. The double on the A.R.C. summer fixture—Auckland Cup and Railway Handicap—is being operated on to a small extent, the prices offered on the field being 100 to 2 if not laid. Jack Brown, a cast-off from J. Booth's stable, won; a double at Mercury Bay races, viz., th"c Cup and Flying Handicap. The pony Madge also annexed a double, the Pony and Selling Race. In the early part of this year an Indian bookmaker laid Record Reign's owner 50,000 rs. to 7600 rs. against that hoi-se for the Viceroy's Cup. The bookmaker must feel particularly uncomfortable just at present. It seems probable, says London "Truth," that the, present year will be distinguished in the annals of the Jockey Club from the circumstances that not a single new member has been elected. There have been candidates, but they have been blackballed, in spite of powerful backing. A Greek fishmonger and a Chinese cook, residents of Newcastle, drew first horse in one of Tattersall's sweeps on the Melbourne Cup. The second horse In the same sweeip was also drawn in Newcastle, a la' 3in the employ of the Singer Manufacturing CTJ. being the lucky holder of the ticket Of Record Reign's re-cent wins at Poona the "Indian Planters' Gazette" says: "He has regained his colonial form, and, given this fact, he is quite a good enough horse to win the Viceroy's Cup. If he Is grood enough to win out of his best distance, then he certainly holds a bigger chance in a longer ,race. He has defeated first class Indian form at a mile and a mile and a quarter; he is an unquestionable stayer, and will find a longer journey more to his liking." Seringapatam and Australian Star sported silk in the King Edward Handicap, a £1(570 race, of li miles, at Leicester, last month. The Auckland horse had a long lead till well in the straight, when he died away. The Duke of Devonshire's bay colt Mormon, a brother of the Flying Eagle, won by a length and a haTf from Volodyovski. Australian Star was favourite at first, but he gradually drif *! out, and at the finish was almost friendless. VolodyovsW showed something of a return to his earlier form. Tod Sloan, who is still under suspension In England and America, is pretty hrfrd up, and is being sued for building debts—something of a contrast to a year or two ago, when he lived at the Hotel Cecil, and was the idol of the British public, who were, however, soon alienated by his "swelled head." F. Kuhn, the Tod Sloan of Australia, is under a two years' suspension for his unsatisfactory handling of Brakpan in the Melbourne Cup, when the best two year old of last year finished an absolute last. At the Athletic Grounds, Whitegate Drive, Blackpool, on October 6, the feature of the programme was a £200 match, in which Callino 11. attempted to beat the two mile world's stallion record ol 5m 3S 2-ss, one mile in saddle, and 1 mile guideless.. Callino 11., ridden by W. Rigby, covered the first mile in faultless fashion, and entered upon his guideless journey well within record time. The stallion trotted all through, without the semblance of a break, and broke the record by 19 4-ss, the time for the "two miles being 5m 18 8-ss. Cannongate was withdrawn from the Takapuna meeting as soon as the weights appeared, his owner considering that he was overweighted at 12.4 after having won his first hurdle race for eighteen months üßSer 10.8 at Ellerslie on November 8. However, the horse, who perhaps has no superior at hurdling in the colony when in farm, proved that he could carry weight and go fast in the SteeplecHase and Tally-ho Steeplechase, both of which he won under 12.0 and 12.12 respectively. Of course there is a vast difference between the country and the small sticks, but the cognoscenti are generally of opinion that even with 12.2 on his bade Cannongate would have been theiy or thereabouts at the finish. The results of. the Derby and Melbourne Pirn says the "Australasian," form a some time past critics nay ingr against the Blii^ o * £". • on> with the score of their not a] , mnBobadil, Maltstei, and Me ning brilliantly as tnree y be gM charge Bm ca two to have,be^" t a long period for a horse seasons is not a lorn, P to remain on we «« . pro . bab i y have haYe * Z i ' °n"S tad not been worked, so raced on if they er3 Tfae Aust Uan Hard as tr f °acl four times in a week at gnSitfnS-TSirenOy-the: descendants of Galopin will not stand this.

On Derby T>ay at the Victorian meetin- When the "bookies" had a bad time, six favourites winning- out of seven races after Sweet Nell won the last raco of the day, one wet, weary, red, disgusted bookie, leaning against a tree in a wilted attitude, cried aloud, in a voice pregnant with emotion: "Great shimmlny, six favourites in one day! And they call the horse the friend of man!" Overcome by his emotions, he sank into a sitting position, threw up two eloquent hands, and wailed again, "And they call the horse the friend of man!" One welshing gentleman was rather badly manhandled before he got away. "A man can*t pay it he_hasn't the money to pay with, can he?' ho cried in the face of a dozen back-

ers. "Tou can'-t get blood out of a stone! "Fortunately, you're not a stone." sal* one fierce tieketholder, hitting out

Patron, like The Victory, ran second in the Maribyrnong race the Wednesday before the Cup. Like The Victory, ha was similarly placed In the Welcoina Stakes^ and both horses were trained bjr R. Bradfle-ld. The Victory was not in much favour on the day, because it was thought he was not fit enough to run out two miles. An ailment of some kind kept him from work for a few days, and; as he had not been racing like most othec candidates, this seemed likely to prevent Bradfield getting him really well. At Caulfield and Maribyrnong The Victory; was no use, tout racing and galloping improved him, and he won. "Never hear* of the blessed horse before!" was the disgusted wail of many thousands of bacfeers when the numbero went up and the winner was fully identified. The book- ' makers were almost in the same position; they had heard very little of th-e horse, but they did not take the win unkindly on that account—far from It* They seemed to regard The Victory wlta an admiration and affection one wouldE hardly expect a mere horse to inspire la the heart of man.

The old order changeth as regai-as trainIng horses, as well as with anything else (says "Atticus" in the "Leader"), and this was especially noticeable with the preparation of the various Cup candidates this season. The ancient style of long, sweating work went out of fashion a generation ago, and no'wa/'ays th* length of the gallops is steadily being1 decreased. A few years back horses used to be repeatedly sent against the watch for the full two miles, and numbers o£ them used to give way owing to the stress of work. This season the longest gallop wiaieased liere was one by Sojaurner, in nearly record time, over a mile and three quarters, and nothing else was sent at its top for more titan a mile and ahalf,which: was the farthest distance covered by Thei Victory, while Abundance never was extended for more than one round of the sand—ll furlongs. Yet it may safely be affirmed that a better-trained lot o!£ horses than those here have never before gone to the post for the big race, and hardly any of them laboured even under a suspicion of unsoundness. A deal of rubbish has lately been written by irresponsible and unpractical persons regarding the deterioration of the Australian! thoroughbred at the present time; but dozens of the horses now training here could be picked' out that for size, bone* and quality would compare with any of ,the cracks of years ago, while, if th© time test be any criterion at all, animals like Duke of Grafton, Abundance, airi The Victory would simply 'have distanced. the old-timers. jl In an article on betting ana gambling in the Melbourne "Leader," a writer, discussing the toite, says:—"Man is a gambling animal. The speculative desire is an, ineradicable instinct of human nature, and those accustomed to treat matters with practical common sense are convinced that it is more conducive to morality to control than to prohibit. Extraordinary estimates of fcinciful invention aro sdmetina.es given concerning the amount of money which is won and lost. But as a matter of fact, whatever the individual injury, the community • suffers very little by this medium of speculation, for th« change is only one of ownership, and not a,n absolute loss. The bookmakers gain wfcen the public suffer, and vice versa. - llf seligous prejudice were to abandon its opposition to the totalise tor there would not exen be this ground of objection, for the money invested wou^d always go back to the pfublic, minus the per-entage takea by the c^ub for the management and the share whfsh the charities might obtain by a form o,t taxation which would injure nobody. It is a curious illustration of professional morality to hug the bookmaker to its .Vospfli and to sternly condemn a compai;i atiyeiy innocent form of speculative excitement. It is an added recommendation t-V this system that besides diminishing rfce evils of betting, it provides for the return of the money t» those who supply it, and also affords an excellent means of jtanposing a pleasura tax without any. Injurious operation. la Prance, the money invested in this way: amounts to between six and sev.en millions sterling. Two per cent, of this sum is given to public charities, and one pep cent, goes to the Minister of Agricultural and is devoted to the encouragement of horse breeding, and to oth>er similar purposes." -s Referring to the subject of paid stewards in Sydney, the "Australasian" says: The special meeting of the A.J.C. to consider amendments and additions', to tn© rules necessary for the appointment _ot paid stewards was held last week. Mr M. J. Macnamara, for the committee, spoke kindly of the new system, but said that, as far as Randwick was concerned, "■the powers of the stipendiary stewards would be confined to investigating and reporting to their masters any matter that required investigation, and recommending a sufficient penalty.' This shows to a nicety how committees of leading clubs regard the paid steward. They believe in him, but they do not like the idea of his usurping their positions. They want to continue to boss the shovr themselves. Now, all racing men know that there is the same necessity for competent stewards at Flemington, Randwick, and Caulfleld that there is at other places. As we have often put it, why slMuld clubs pay for talent to do the handicapping, judging, starting, etc., and take for stewards men who have no qualification for the position? Is the work of a steward at Flemington and. Randwick of so little importance as compared to other offices that any coznmltteernan is considered competent to do itSome of those who attended the A.J.Imeeting were not long in ifttingr "w committee know that they bought the paid men should have the same "Let us go slow, and ir »i M fully approved of *^ .^ n**Ve- to the SLSS SS^* J?S3f 5 Uc opinion, and^mato room fo]lowed suspicious happened, the stipendiary stewards were to apprise tfcesteww£ of the day" If it is admitted that the day are not likely to see anything for themselves why not replace them with the men who am credited with having the grift of sight? Dr Trail moved an amendment that tna paid men should have the same power at Randwick as elsewhere, and he was supported by Mr Adrian Knox. The amendment was lost, but the chairman had previously told the meeting "That Uio change was an experiment, and in the future they could adopt it fully, if time proved it was a good system. The appointment of stewards of the day was permissive, and could be dropped at any moment If it was found the stipendiary stewards were fully competent to deal with the racing, he had no doubt the committee would cease to appoint stewards of the day." On the whole, then, tlie meeting >ia.cl a satisfactory termination, from the point of view of those who favour paid stewards. All the committee have to do now is to find threa good men. When these men settle down ito their work, and show that they are j' an improvement on the* old system, it is I not likely to be long before they 'are i given charge of the racing at Rand wick. i And then probably we will get paid men in Victoria.

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Bibliographic details

THE Racing World., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 278, 22 November 1902, Supplement

Word Count
2,354

THE Racing World. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 278, 22 November 1902, Supplement

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