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DEATH OF THE PRIMATE.

SUDDEN, BUT NOT UNEXPECTED.

A PEAQEFUL END

Very few of the many friends of the. Most Rev. Day Cowie, Bishop of Auckland, and Primate of New Zeala'hd, had any idea when the fact was announced a fortnight ago that Hi's Lordship had deedded to resign the high office he has so long held, he was only doing so because his life was also ebbing to a close. Such has, however, proved to be the case, and the sad news that the Primate was dead came as a shock this morning to all but those intimate relatives .and friends who knew how critical was the condition of His Lordship's /health: The tolling of St, Mary's bell this morning first gave forth the sad intimation that the kindly, courteous gentleman, whose venerable figure is

so well known to the present generation of Aucklanders, had been called to his rest. Before long flag's were at half mast all over the city, and also on the vessels in port, for the: late Primate was a man highly esteemed by all who. knew him, whether members of the Anglican Church or not. He was in no sense a narrow man, sund wiberever he stayed in his parochial visitations round the diocese, he made life long friends, who will sincerely mourn their loss. It was on account of his critical condition that he felt it his duty to resign office a fortnight ago, and for the past few days it was seen that the Primate was gradually growing weaker, consequently the members of his family were summoned.

As already indicated, the death of His Lordship was not entirely unexpected, as he had been getting gradually weaker for the last five weeks, and Dr. Mackellar, v/ho had been in constant attendance, had warned the relatives that the condition was critical. At the same time, the end was somewhat sudden, for even as late as last evening His Lordship was chatting with some friends and relating incidents of his life in India. He had, however, been very restless for the last three days. Towards 4 o'clock this morning His Lordship grew quieter, and the end came half an hour later, the Rev. E. M. Cowie and a nurse being the only persons present.

His Lordship remained conscious until within about fifteen minutes of his death. He occasionally spoke to his son on family matters before he became unconscious. After that he remained perfectly quiet, and finally drew three or four long breaths, and died. So sudden was the finish of His Lordship's life that although a messenger was despatched at once for Dr. Mackellar, and that gentleman ran over the road in great haste, still upon his arrival he saw at once that death had already taken place, \the cause being heart failure. ...,,, Dr. Cowie was born in 1831, and consecrated to the Bishopric of Auckland m 18G9, in succession to Bishop Selwyn. A biography of His Lordship appeared in our issue of Friday week when his resignation was announced, and will not therefore require repeating. Very general sympathy is expressed with the bereaved family, and more particularly the widow who has to bear this rial m addition to her ownbodily weakness. 'it has been decided to inter the remains of Bishop Cowie at Tararna C-eineterv (St. Stephen's), Parnell, in the portion set apart for Andean clergymen. The funeral will + take place on Saturday, at 3 p.m., there being first of all a service in bt. Mary's Cathedral, Parnell. Ihe Defence. Department has decided to inter the remains with military honours and notification to that.effect appears elsewhere. As His Lordship had always a great distaste for hearses, the coffin will.be drawn to the place of burial on a gun-carriage, and it is desired that all who follow will do so on foot, so that there shall not be any carriages in the cortege. Mention was made at all tne churches to-day of the dSath of the Primate. At St. Sepulchre s the church was draped in black. At tiie Pitt-street 'Wesleyan service the Rev. Mr Garland made kindly reference to the death of the Primate, and as ac instance of His Lordship's courtesy mentioned that some years ago when stationed at Mongonui/he met Bishop Cowie and raised his hat. He was surprised-at the cool nature of the response, having been introduced. In the course of the afternoon, however, the Bishop called at his residence, for the purpose of apologising for not having recognised him, and explained, he had been cudgelling his brains to remember who"it,was who had saluted him, and having done so he had. called to explain matters. It was with such acts of simple unaffected, gentle, manly, courtesy that Bishop Cowie made so many friends outride of hi* own church.

(By . Telegraph.—Own Correspondent.)

THAMES, this day

General regret is expressed at the death of Bishop Cowie. Flags were hoisted at half-mast this morning.

(By Telegraph.—Press Association.)

CHRISTCHIIRCH, this day,

A memorial service forHhe Primate is to be held in the Cathedral at 5.15 this afternoon.

(By Telegraph.—Press Association.)

DUNEDIN, this day.

In accordance with the canons provided for the purpose, Bishop Neville, as senior Bishop, becomes the Act-ing-Primate until the General Synoc} can meet for the purpose of the election of a successor to the late Bishop Cowie.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19020626.2.82

Bibliographic details

DEATH OF THE PRIMATE., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 150, 26 June 1902

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886

DEATH OF THE PRIMATE. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 150, 26 June 1902

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