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RACING FIXTURES.

March 29, 31, and April I—Auckland K.C. Autumn March 31 and April 1-K2.J.C. Autumn March 31 and April I—Kumara R.C. March 31 and April. I—Riverton R.C. March 31 and April I—Feilding J.C March 31 and April I—Wairarapa R.C April 3 and 4—Westland R.C. April 9 and 10-Nelson J.C. April 9 and 10—South Canterbury. April 15 and 16—Marlbbrough R.C. April 16 and 17—Southland R.C. April 24 and 26-Wellington R.C.

No horse has won the Napier Park Cup more than once.

The Canterbury Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting commences on Monday.

The Doncaster Handicap is run for today, tHe Sydney Cup on Monday.

BeautiftU weather for the Auckland Racing Club's Autumn Meeting to-day.

Privileges for the Waihi Hack Meeting to be held on Eastsr Monday realised £26.

Auckland owners are unrepresented In the Wellington Racing Club Thompson Handicap.

Nominations for the Avondale Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting are due on Wednesday, April 2.

The filly Immersion, winner of the Two-year-old Handicap at Napier Park, is a daughter of Gipsy Grand.

There are now some twenty odd yearling visitors to the Ellerslie tracks, seme of them being thus early forward.

J. B. Williamson has the Cyrenian— Minola colt ■on the course occasionally, and the youngster seems very tractable.

Nonete looks to have a great chance of winning the Century Stakes on Monday. Tortulla may give him a good race, however.

The hurdle gelding Waiwera was brought up from New Plymouth this morning, his owner, Mr O'Driacoll, coming with him.

The funeral of the late Mr W. Ryan, of Karangahake, took place yesterday, and was largely attended. Mr Ryan was the owner of Crecy.

There has not been so little pre-post betting over an Easter meeting in Auckland within the past twenty years as over that now in progress.

The bot fly has been less troublesome this season in Auckland so far than in Canterbury. The sparrows are given credit for keeping down the pest.

The report that Sir Rupert Clarke intends sending La Carabine to England for sale has caused certain people who think that the mare should be retained in the colonies to bewail the fact.

A Press Association wire says the following are the principal winning amounts over the Napier Park meeting :-MrLaunceston, £495; Mr W. Rathbone, *!»£*** T. Blake, £110; Hon. J. D. Ormond, £105, smaller amounts bringing the-total to |fiß6o.

It Is extremely unlikely that Royal Artillery and Nonette will meet in the New Zealand St. Leger at Wellington next month. As Mr Stead would not send him up t* engage Nonette over a mile and a-hatt wurse. it is hardly likely that he wOI run him. a few weeks -ence over a mile and three-quarters.

The Ninth Contingent had real bad luck with their horses, losing and getting more injured probably than all the other contingents put together, owing to bad weather during the first two or three days after leaving New Zealand. Upto the last week before leaving the horses were in splendid health and condition. Then some of them contracted influenza, and a good many were being treated for that trouble on board. Rough weather on top of influenza and sickness would be very trying.

In the Lincolnshire Handicap decided on the 18th inst., Mr S. H. Goltan s^Australian Star, -8.7, was amongst the acceptors. Epsom Lad, 9.8.. ana Darletos, 8.10, -were the only two above Mm in the list. The winner, St. Maclou, last season won the Forty-second Newmarket Biennial Stakes of £757, 1 mile 11 yards, in 1.43 4-5, beating Magic Mirror, Volodyovski, and four others. He was three times unplaced, but finished third (7.G) at the back end to Floriform (7.6) and Pellusin (7.4) in the Liverpool Autumn Cup, in which there was a big field. Mirai, dam of MacJou, won the Oaks and One Thousand Guineas in 1891. F. Rickaby, the recently disqualified jockey, rode her. Mr Siever's Sceptre, who finished second to Maclou, ■would no doubt be one of the well-sup-ported ones. A win would be acceptable Just now to Mr Siever, who has been quite out of luck for some time.

The Melbourne correspondent of the Sydney "Town and Country Journal' Bays that from a racing point of view probably the autumn meeting -was one of the most successful ever held by the V.R.C. at Flemington. Though, perhaps, the quality of the cattle, was not equal to that at some former gatherings, says that writer, I never remember such a percentage of slashing finishes during th« last 20 years. It cannot be said that the campaign revealed anything very highclass amongst the youngsters. Brakpan may, all things considered, be fairly entitled to rank as the best of the two-year-olds just now, but in Abundance the veteran, James Wilson, has a good sort, who, hardly as brilliant, perhaps, as Pay* ten's youngster, is about as game as they are made. Strata Florida promises to Improve, Loyal is nearly first-class, and, 1 think, will also be served with time; and the Graf ton gelding, Mllner, will, I feel sure, more than pay for his oatfl. Niphetos is a clinking good filly, but Bhe will probably be taken by Mr Robinson to England, while Hekrise, though very smart over five furlongs, does not seem to relish any extra distance. Th« ■writer regards Kaimate as one of th© best jumpers seen at Flemington lor some time.

the year of his lamented death—the Admiral asked me to put him £5 on Scamp for the Northamptonshire Stakes. I saia, 'Admiral, Scamp has as much chance as you would have to run on foot stand £10 with me. I'm putting £50 on one. I'll not tell What it is until the race id over. When you see the result you will be perfectly ashamed of your handicap.' The borse I proposed backing, ana did back, was Queen of Cyprus, and, obtaining seven fifties, I put the Admiral down 70 to 10. The public were mad for Scamp, but Queen of Cyprus won by 30 lengths. Some days passed before I met the Admiral. He put up both hands in acknowledgment of defeat 'When I go/ he, said—the gallant old Admiral was then growing feeble—Hodgman, you must be handicapper.' " The following Is an excellent instance of the Admiral's high handed manner of managing affairs in What may now almost be termed old days, and something of the same sort would occasionally not be out of place at the present time: "Mr Sykes then formed one of the party of three for the Surrey and Middlesex Stakes, distance a couple •of miles. And the principal cause of his starting was that, unknown to each other, the connections of Fulbeck and Winkfleld had promised Mr Clark 50 soys. each to make running for their horse. The betting ruled even money Winkfield, and 6 to 5 Fulbeck, while 10 to one was vainly tendered against Mr Sykes, who was not expected to win. But when the jockey found himself carried strenuously to the front he certainly did not over exert himself, The horse, however, took matters very much under his own control, and in the end dead heated with Fulbeck. That Mr Sykes should have won easily was apparent to the meanest intellect; and, red hot with passion, Admiral Rous was quickly at the weighing room door..'This dead heat,' he thundered, 'is to be run off, and Fordham shall ride Mr Sykes.' That was impossible, as naturally Major Bringhurst stood out for Fordham again riding his horse, Fullbeck. On that, the Admiral went 'to Preeee, Mr Sykes' jockey, to whom he said, 'You, sir, make your way home on that horse as beet you can. If you don't win, or I see you don't try to win, mind I'll warn the whole lot of you off.' The general opinion was reflected by the betting on the decider, 4 to 1 being laid on Mr Sykes, who won in a canter by a length. "—Exchange.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

RACING FIXTURES., Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 74, 29 March 1902

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1,322

RACING FIXTURES. Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 74, 29 March 1902

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