Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Devonport Borough Council met last evening- and transacted an amount of routine business. Dr. J. A. Lang wrote offering three framed pictures, to 'be placed in the public reading-room, and suggested that old residents of the district be asked to give photographs or sketches of the place in the early days, to be kept in the reading-room. Dr. Lang's generous offer was accepted with thanks, and it was decided to act on his suggestion. __ . .__._

The somewhat unexpected death of Mt John Johnston, of Zion Hill Estate, Birkenhead, on Monday at mid-day, at the age of 66, came as a surprise to the whole of the district. The deceased for jsome years past had been somewhat of a recluse, suffering from debility and an ailment in one of the eyes, • which debarred him from taking an active part in public matters, etc.; bat in the earlier history of NorthcoJte and Birkenhead he was one of the foremost pioneers, having on various occasions a seat on the Road Board, School Committee and Licensing Bench. Mr Johnston was a native of Belfast, Ireland. He arived on the Thames goldfield early in 1869 and at once identified himself with the Wesleyan Sunday school, but the excitement of those stirring times were not to his taste, and he loft and took up or bought the well known Zion Hill property in 1871. At this period the settlers were very scattered and Dissenters were without a place of worship, but the deceased with several others, who long ago "passed "the bourne," succeeded in erecting- that prominent landmark known as the Mount Zion Wesleyan Church, of which he was a trustee, and many times superintendent of the Sunday school connected therewith. Widespread sympathy is felt for the widow and family, who mourn the loss of a good husband and father, while the Wesleyan Church loses one of its stariuchest supporters, and the district a kind a charitable patron, whose aid was never asked in vain. Some months ago (says "Samoanische Zeitung") a damaging, charge ■was brought against individual members of the London Missionary Society in Samoa, to the effect that they had offensively interfered with the official arrangements for the Empetot'b. Birthday, which happened to fjflT on a Sunday, and had attempted to raise disloyal feelings among the natives by stringently enforcing the religious observance of that day. This serious charge of disloyalty to the Government and to His Imperial Majesty was circulated throughout Germany, and caused considerable suspiciows as to the policy of the L.M.S. in Samoa. A "Defence" was published bj*- the Mission at the request of His Excellency the Governor, and the rej suit has been that after the fullest I investigation by the authorities at Samoa and in Berlin, the members of the Mission have been completely cleared of any evil intention and the charges are declared to be absolutely without foundation. A runaway horse caused some excitement and a bad accident to a boy at Te Aroha on Monday. 'The runaway, near the Post Office, joined several other horses, and the whole mob galloped off. A number of children were playing on the path, and they all, with the exception of a four-year-old son of Mr Geo. Bygrave, got out of the way. The frightened animal dashed into the little fellow, turning him over several times. On examination it was found the boy's leg was broken below the knee and the skin was very badly lacerated. He was promptly attended to by Dr. Cooper. The liev. J. G. Greenhough, M.A., President of the National Council of Evangelical Churches, and ex-Presi-dent of the Baptist Union of Great j Britain and Ireland, is expected to arrive in Auckland by the mail steamer on October^lO. He will both preach and lecture during his stay in Auckland. It is said that as a lecturer the Rev. J. G. Greenhough has few • equals, and that as a preacher not many are his superiors. Our distinguished visitor will deliver two lectures in Auckland, the first on "Our Puritan and Protestant Forefathers." A quotation from the lecture will perhaps show that it ought to appeal to large numbers who are outside the churches. He says: "If the new democracy were not so in- j tolerant of everything that is old, it might improve its temper and learn some lessons in moderation in the Puritan school. That school was the Bethlehem of the new age of collectivism, or, as it is called, State socialism." He then remarks: "The State is no wiser than the average contents of the ballot-box, and its hands are bandaged in red tape. It is sufficiently clever to fashion imitative functionaries and automata; bnt manhood develops on surer lines when the State secures It room to work in, and then for the most part leaves it alone." The subject of the second lecture is "The Condition of Religion* Life and Religious Parties in England." Both subjects are timely, and dealt with by a man possessing marked ability as well as considerable oratorical gifts should be of general interest. Mr E. Bockaert, seci-etary of the Auckland Cycle Roads League, receivtlie following telegram this morning from the Premier:—"l am pleased to hear there are no objections in the smaller districts to the Cycle Bill, and wish the isame applied here in the House, where there is a large section of country members who are opposed to it. lam in correspondence with Mr, Fowlds on the subject.—(Signed) R. J. Seddon." Rumours being, afloat (says the "Samoaniisehe Zeitung") to the^ effect that the. German Government will pay all the claims for native looting during the last Sanioan "war. and the fact of its having repaid recently to the German claimants the fees paid by the latter s.ome time now to Mr Mulligan to act on their behalf, gives colour to the report.. But we are in a position to positively, state that this is not so. As the matter now stands, Germany says that the war in 1899 was unnecessary, and England asserts that it was necessary, but as America has not yet stated its opinion on the subect nothing can be done in the matter by the umpire, His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, until America has stated it. It is to be houed in the interests of the unfortunate lootees that there will be. very little longer delay in the settlement. -j^p George Henning has taken over Brunswick Mart in Queen-street. Alterations and improvements to the premises are now in progress. It is intended to use the large upper portion of the building- for teaching bicycle riding. Repairs will now be effected in the Queen-street premises, and the manufacturing business will be continued at Stanley-street as usual. - In our advertising columns appears an announcement that the Parnell "At Home," to be held on the 4th inst., has been postponed indefinitely.

Captain Edwin wired at. 11 a.m.: "North to east and southeast gale soon; sea heavy; tides very high; very heavy rain; indications rivers flooded after 16 hours from now."

An unusual amount of interest has been aroused in golf in Auckland this year owing, to the opening of the picturesque links at One Tree Hill, and the fact that the New Zealand championship is being decided there this week. Even those who do not look to be ever initiated into the mysteries of the game are open to the beauties of the magnificent public domain which the opening of the links on- Saturday last has brought into prominence, and thousands v. ho never touch a club will betake themselves to Epsom to enjoy the breezes of Maungakiekie, now that the golfers have led the way. The great function of Saturday, which was enjoyed by a large concourse of visitors, is finely illustrated in this week's "Graphic." In addition to a full-page picture of the guests assembled in front of the club-house, there are pictures of the house itself, of Dr. Campbell playing the first stroke on the green, and a number of beautiful reproductions of the exhibition match, showing the players and onlookers. Another feature of the issue is a large series of pictures of the sources /»f Auckland's new water supply, taken along the line of route recently traversed by the City Councillors. These views are particularly interesting. Ashburton, a city of the Canterbury Plains, is the title of a profusely illutrated article. The senior and junior teams of the Grafton District Rugby Football Club are reproduced in two splendid engravings. The former is the winner of the Auckland championship for this year. Among the miscellaneous pictures vnny lie mentioned cartoons, cartoonlets, St.. Matthew's Church choir, etc. The number is now on sale.

A limelight lecture on "The Armenian Massacres" will be given to night by Mr. George Aldridge in the Weststreet Church, Newton.

We are informed that Messrs W. and A. Gilbey, Ltd., of London, have been appointed by Royal Warrant purveyors of wines and spirits to His Majesty King Edward VII. Mr Arthur H. Nathan is the local representative.

To-morrow G. Lewis and Co. sell at the residence of Mrs Sellers, Mt. Albert, piano, tax cart, cow, saddJery and dairy utensils, etc. Andrew's 'buses leave Queen-street 'at 10 past 10, returning after sale.

WADE'S TEETHING POWDERS, for babies are soothing-, reduce fever, and prevent blotches. Price 1/. —Ad.

Smith and Caughey have just opened a special line of holland cooking aprons, lOid, 1/, 1/3, 1/6, 1/9, 1/11 each.

Geo. Fowlds has a splendid show of lovely ties in Arcade window, at 1/ each, or 3 for 2/6. Just see them. (Ad.)

Special show day to-morrow. Latest styles in ready - made costumes, mantles, and blouses. —D.S.C.—(Ad.)

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19011002.2.40

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume XXXII, Issue 224, 2 October 1901

Word Count
1,613

Auckland Star Auckland Star, Volume XXXII, Issue 224, 2 October 1901

Working