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HIPPON'S NOTE BOOK.

The last Auckland Cup winner Binejacket, who has been in retirement ever since, has again been taken in hand by Peter Chaafe. He has been hacked about the roads a bit of late.

Word conies from Melbourne that tlie late Mr W. R. Wilson's horses in training \yill be sold by auction in August. In the meantime none of them will he raced. The stallions, brood mares, yearlings, etc.. will not bt sold until the end of December, and Mr Macilonakl has agreed to manage St. Albans for the executors until the stud is sold ofl.

Old Kanaka changed hands on Monday last, Mr F. B. Ross purchasing him for £175. The same buyer, I understand, has also become the owner of Hylas. >.'r. lioss has earned a reputation for patching up horses, and it is to be hoped he has a bit of luck with the latest acquisition to his stable. ■

Dummy has sufficiently recovered from the mishap to his hind leg- that Percy Johnson was able to take his charge back to Xew Plymouth on Sunday Tast in the s.s. Gairloch.

Weights for the Melbourne Cup tire due on Monday' next. In discussing the nominations a scribe on the Melbourne "Sportsman" writes: Looking through the Melbourne Cup entries, the first thing that occurs to me is that Mr F. F. Dakin, the weight-adjuster, will find it necessary to write "fist 71b" a lot of times in compiling- his figures. There are several owners of "Cup candidates" who know now to an ounce what their horses will get, for by no stretch of imagination could a nandicapper put some of the "duffers" engaged even one mark above the lowest limit. But when we remember that the Melbourne Cup is always the means of bringing the best galloping material in the land together, we can afford to overlook the number of moderates that yearly stray into the big list. They all help to keep the game a-going, and if owners can spare a pound or two for useless nominations, so much the better. Unfortunately, some of the "rubbish" are likely to see the post, where they are only in the road; but we can bear ■with even a little of this if the thing is not carried too far. Many a good horse's chance has been spoiled in the Melbourne Cup by being impeded in his passage by no account moderates rolling about with exhaustion. But this always will be, and we must make the best of it.

The "Australasian" devotes a leading article to the entries for the Melbourne and Caulfield Cups, and states there is not a real champion hi either event. With regard to the imposts of Seahorse and Advance, the writer thinks Mr Dakin^ will have a lot to think out. The difficulty of getting a top weight in the Melbourne Cup is aleo pointed out, and the article concludes: "If all handicaps were as hard to make as those for the two Cups will be, we should have to at least consider Mr Albert Miller's contention that in such cases the only chance of giving every horse a chance is to go back to the sst 71b minimum, or make divided handicaps. And rather than adopt either suggestion we would recommend snowing scant mercy to the horses which are out of place in the Melbourne and Caulfield Cups."

English files to hand show that Diamond Jubilee had no difficulty in winning the Two Thousand Guineas, taking" charge after going a quarter of a mile, and giving- nothing else a chance from that out. He did not start favourite, that position being held by Elopement at 15 to 8, while Sailor Lad, a Ladas colt, was next in demand at 9 to 4, then coming- Diamond Jubilee at 11 to 4, and Captain Kettle at 10 to 1, which, we may add, were not at all bad prices for the books. Besides those mentioned, there were six other runners, who were quoted at from 40 to 100 to 1, Sidus, who finished third, going out at the latter figure, while Bonarosa, the second horse, started at 50 to 1. The first and second favourites were in trouble a long way from home, Elopement eventually finishing fourth, and Sailor Lad seventh. It •was generally anticipated that Diamond Jubilee would play up either in the paddock or at the post, but he displayed no disposition to do so. Possibly the fact of H. Jones, the stable lad who had been riding him in his •work, being in the saddle, may have had something to do with it, -for it was only a few weeks previous he had shown tremendous temper when ridden by M. Cannon in a private spin. The time for the race was fast, the mile and eleven yards being cut out in Imin. 41 3-ssecs. Of course the Prince of Wales came in for a great ovation, being accorded three cheers, while the rider, Jones, was not forgotten, a cheer going up for him. When the riders Jhad weighed in the Prince sent for Jones, and after shaking hands with him, congratulated him on his success.

There are a lot of illustrious names in the pedigree of H.K.H. the Prince of Wales' brilliant colt, Diamond Jubilee. Pocahontas, Queen Mary, Martha Lynn, Beeswing, and Volley may be mentioned among the famous mares. On the dam's side the Derby ■winner's relatives were not all great performers, but they come up to Count Lehndorf s requirements, inasmuch as they raced on, and thus proved their soundness. Perdita 11. raced for four seasons, and won four races, "besides running a dead heat with Middlethorps for the Liverpool Autumn Cup—her last race. Perdit's dam, Hennoine, and her granddam La Belle Helene, both did a good deal of racing, but like Pocahontas, they never won.

I ing so well in England this season us to have become the rage. One of them, an unnamed bay out of Winera, started at odds on for the May Plate at Newmarket recently, and beat 12 opponents as he liked. Iso such two-year-old as this is said to have been seen for a long time in England, and subsequently it was reported that at) offer of 10,000 soys, had been refused for him. Among the Melton colt's opponent;-; was the Trenton—Folly Eeeles colt, who was conceding the winner 101b. and ran third. Another | Melton, a colt out of La Rosiere, bent i six opponents easily in the Mostyn Two-year-old LMate, at Chester, but his stable companion, by the same sire from Schvolbook. with o to ~ on her, was unplaced in a field of five for the Ormonde Two-year-old Plate. These Meltons are all owned by Mi J. Musker.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19000620.2.15

Bibliographic details

HIPPON'S NOTE BOOK., Auckland Star, Volume XXXI, Issue 145, 20 June 1900

Word Count
1,126

HIPPON'S NOTE BOOK. Auckland Star, Volume XXXI, Issue 145, 20 June 1900

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