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"HIPPONA'S"

From Melbourne comes word by «W. that at the Melbourne Hunt dub meeting on Saturday last Ml J. B Pearson's brown mare Contrast, cired by good old Commotion from Sessina? defeated the much-talked of Le Var at weight-for-age over a mik and a q^^arter iti the !Narre Warren Sta^ Both Contrast and Le Var are six years of age, but the iormer would have a 51b allowance on nccount of her sex. The weights the pair would carry then on Saturday would be: Contrast 8.13, Le \ar 9.4. jn the Melbourne Cup Contrast is w i"hted at 8.0 and Le Var at 8.11, ai/the cable states the pair are now equal favourites for the great two mile Flemington race at 100 to 7 each. Trailing track reports from Melbourne recently speak well of the doings of Contrast, who it will be remembered unexpectedly downed Le Var, Paul Pry, and others, at w.f.a., in the Elder 'stakes at Adeliade last Hay, and followed it up by winning the Adelaide Cup very comfortably. In the last-mentioned race she only had 7.0, so there was nothing particularly brilliant in the performance; but there was a lot of merit in her defeat of Le Var in the w.f.a. race, as though the latter was not the horse then that he is now, he was in very fair trim, as shown by the fact of his carrying 9.2 into third place in the Adelaide Cup at the same meeting. Contrast has been withdrawn from the Caulfield Cup in which she had 8.2, so like Le Var she is to be specially reserved for the Melbourne Cup.

The Press Association representative at Xapier who wired the results of the races through yesterday to the tveuing papers badly blundered over the time the race for the Hawke's Bay Guineas was run in, for it was plainly written on the copy of the telegram 1.40 3-5, instead of 1.43 1-5.

The Auckland bred horses Lancaster, Lord Cureton, and Ideal are all reported to be doing well in their training work at Caulfield. Lancaster las ngain been supported in the V.R.C. Derby and Melbourne Cup betting. The trio are freely entered for events to be decided at the Caulfield Cup meeting this month.

In Positano and Clarion Hie Sydney owner-trainer, Mr J. Allsop, turned out the favourites for the last two Melbourne Cups, but neither ran anything near up to expectations. This year Allsop has another fancied Cup candidate in the English-bred Voyou in his stable, and it is by no means improbable that the good-looking bay will accomplish what Positano and Clarion failed to do. In 8.0 Voyou has a very handy weight, and those who have already supported him for the two-mile race will be pleased to know that he is progressing as well as could to wished.

The following are the entries for the V.A.T.C. Caulfield Stakes, a mile and a furlong, run at Caulfield on October 14 under weight-for-age conditions:—Kobold, Lancaster, Morn, Hyniettus, Bobadil, Revenue, Auric, Scorn, Cranberry, Town Clock, Merriwee, Veneda, Le Var, Fleet Admiral, Ballistite, Standish, Blackwood, Contrast, Walt-a-Bit, Bundook, Dirk Hammerhand, Australian Star, Cocos, Dewey, Flodden, Reviver, The Chief, Gauleon.

Le Var, who performed so well at Randwick recently, and "is such a strong order for the Melbourne Cup, is unquestionably one of the hardiest Worses in training. He commenced racing at two years old, winning at his first try, and.thought now in his sixth year has never missed a season. Altogether Le Var has run in 44 races, of which he won 12, including two-J'ear-old races at Randwick and Remington, the West Australian Derby, Queen's Plate (twice), Coolgarclie Cup, A.J.C. Craven and Randttiok. Plates, Perth Stakes (twice), and Perth Cup, and was on many other occasions placed. He has raced m ftew South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and West Australia, and still shows no signs of breaking down.

A correspondent- writes:—-On Saturday last at Drury I spent a pleasant day looking- around Messrs 100 nian's racing establishment, be™ff accorded a hearty welcome by Mr ,7. Tooman. The first box was tenanted by Pipivvharauroa. The son °f Deringer is looking fit and well, and seems none the worse for his victory at Avondale. In the adjoining "ox Little Wonder was located. He 13 excellent condition. His next neighbour was a fine upstanding gelding £ n «ied Chandelier, who has not yet been raced. Texas was the next that came under observation. He ran

third in the Second Pony Handicap at the Avondale Meeting. Little Tom "was looking a picture of health. An unbroken filly by Regel—Friendship was running in a paddock. She is likely to develop into a fine mare.

"Hotspur" says that ScrewgTin is being thoroughly rested, and it will be some considerable, time before he is seen in public. He has thickened out, but not grown much. Field Eose is described by the Christchurch scribe as a sweet filly, brimful of quality. The Yaldhurst three-year-olds in commission Courtier, Sant Ilario", SkobelofE and Tolstoi are all looking well.

When H. J. Morrison, the rider of Bobadil, returned to Melbourne after the A.J.C. Spring Meeting, h^ was repoi"ted to have said that had it not been for foul riding on the part of some of the Sydney jockeys, the results of at least two races at the Spring meeting would have been different. The committee of the Australian Jockey Club naturally asked Morrison by letter to give particulars of the alleged foul riding, and the names of the offenders, with a view to further action, to which Morrison replies that he made no such statement as that attributed to him, its author being a Melbourne sporting seribet. That being- so, the A.J.C. committee Avill take no further action in the matter.

The fact that Merman wears no plates in his races in England—that is, runs barefoot—'has drawn the following comments from a writer in "Land and Water":—"This practice, so common as to be wellnig-h universal in the land of Merman's birth, is one that might well be made so in England, for it will readily be understood that a horse may carry weight otherwhere than on or under the saddle; and when we bear in mind that the average racing plate weighs from half a pound upwards, we may easily see the difference its presence or absence on a horse's hoof may make to his speed or time over a given distance. In Australia seven seconds is generally reckoned and allowed either way when computing the result of any trial in respect to this detail of plates or no plates. Of course, I know I shall be told that the time-test is no good over here,' 'of no account,' and all that sort of thing, to which I can only reply that, even granting- this to be correct for the moment, we cannot got away from the weight being there; and as the Jockey Club have no rule, so far as I am aware, pertaining to the usage or non-usage of plates, it would be as well in the interests of the handicaps, as well as those engaged therein, if some definite rule of practice were laid down in this connection.

The second edition of "Centaur's Index," containing performances of Caulfield and Melbourne Cup candidates up to the end of the A.J.C. meeting, is to hand. I have to thank Mr R. P. Hurren, of Melbourne, for sending me a copy of his up-to-date and handy pocket reference.

Flying- Fox and Cyllene will probably meet in the Champion Stakes, which is rim on October 10. on the first day of the Newmarket Second October Meeting. Should all go well up to the day with the two best horses of their respective years, the race between the Duke of Westminster's and Mr C. D. Rose's champions will undoubtedly arouse widespread interest.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18991004.2.10

Bibliographic details

"HIPPONA'S", Auckland Star, Volume XXX, Issue 235, 4 October 1899

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1,308

"HIPPONA'S" Auckland Star, Volume XXX, Issue 235, 4 October 1899

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