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MISCELLANEOUS.

Some surprise was caused in racing circles yesterday when it became known that St. Paul would be an acceptor for the Auckland Cup, for itWas generally thought the popular little horse had bidden good-bye to the racecourse for a time. However, late on Thursday afternoon St. Paul was given a gallop on the tan at headquarters, and after breakfast yesterday he was again exercised over a distance of ground, Parian Jeannie bringing him home at top over the last six furlongs of the journey. It is

stated that St, Paul pulled tip all right and his trainer, of course, was in high glee. Since St. Paul returned from Christchureh he has been blistered all round. Word from Papakura states that Swordfish is sound and well. Nominations for all events of the ! Wade Racing Club Meeting to be held under A.R.C. rules on Friday, December 30, close on Wednesday next- with Mr S. Scruby, secretary. The Wade Club has been one of the first northern clubs to fall into line with the A.R.C. j and through doing so they have lost ; the support of most of tlie northern horses. It is to be hoped that they will therefore get substantial support from Auckland horse owners. A horse badly handicapped in the Auckland Cup is Coronet, Last year he had but 6.12, and he could not get in the placed division. Now, since that period he has won but one race, the Takapuna Cup, and his impost is made 7.7. Boadicea, who won a couple of races at the Coromandel Meeting for Mr N. Dickey, of Paeroa, is by the Musket horse Tetford, from, Virginia. Miss Nelson has been taken up again and at present. W. Croll has her in hand at the North Shore. : l The hurdler St, Simon has been ' thrown out of work. Three Auckland Cup candidates were seen out under silk this Aveek. St. Gordon pulled off the double at Coromandel and Crusoe narrowly defeated Okoari at Feilding races in the St. Andrew's Handicap of 200 soys., 1J miles, on Wednesday last. No penalties are provided for in the conditions of the Auckland Cup, so both St. Gordon and Crusoe escape having their original weights raised. There has been a fair amount of wagering on the Auckland Cup during i the week, but two of the most prominent pencillers have not yet opened their volumes on the race. The following wagers, however, have been written:—loo to 20 Tirant d'Eau; 200 to 24 Nestor; 200 to 10 Waiorongomai; 200 to 8 Bluejacket; 400 to 20 Explosion; 200 to 16 Crusoe; 100 to 12 Nestor. A wager of 500 to 40 was wanted Okoari. The posting of the Auckland Cup acceptances did not lead to any notable wagering. Quotations to-day are as follows:—4 to 1 v. Tirant d'Eau, 7 to 1 Swordfish, Cruesoe and Nestor, 10 to 1 St. Paul and St. Gordon, 12 to 1 Acone, Rex, and Fabulist. No sooner is the famous double — two Cups—over than speculation opens on the next. According to a Sydney paper there are backers now asking for Right Honourable in connection with the Caulfield Cup, and for the Melbourne Cup Phillip, Clarion, and ; Hopscotch; while a little is already j booked about the two Scorns and his j stable companion Revenue in connec- j Lion, with the V.R.C. Derby and Mcl- j bourne Cup. | On the strength of his Coromandel victories St. Gordon is being talked about in connection with the Auckland Cup. Si, Hippo continues to improve in rendition and is doing really well at Klierslie. During the present week Nestor, \cone and Explosion have been regular track attendants at Ellerslie. Mr Alfred Joseph, the recognised leader of the Victorian ring, came over from Melbourne in the s.s. Alameda. He is recruiting at the Hot Lakes Nominations for the East Tamaki races are due to-night. T. Taylor, the well-known horseman, bar, taken the stables at Ellerslie lately vacated by F. Stenning. Sapphire (dam of Bluefire) and Valentinia are the only mares now to foal at Wellington Park. Messrs Alison Bros, have lost a good looking two-year-old colt got by Seaton Delaval from Phantom. Next to Titan The Grafter has brought more money than any gelding ever sold in Australia. Titan brought 4,000 guineas ana- Tlie Grafter 2 'ooo guineas. The date of the departure from Melbourne for England of the racehorses The Grafter. Battalion, Manzona, Syerla and Sailor Boy has been decided upon, and these horses will leave in the s.s. Aberdeen on the 12th January next, going via the Cape, which is now the favourite route for horses. J. E. Brewer, who will be in charge, thinks that his team will be so little affected by the change of climate that he will be able to put them into easy work .in May, or at least in June, and though in thus anticipating Brewer may be- expecting too much, each member of the contingent is very hardy, and it is quite on the cards that the programme will be carried out, R. Lewis, the Victorian light-weight, also goes with the team. 'The popular Abercorn is not to be buried in Ireland after all. He is to stand at Cobham under the management of Mr W. Allison, and no man in England has such opportunities of pushing a horse as the gentleman named. At the Caulfield races recently a gelding named Nilus, sired by Glorious, equalled the feats of Goulburn and Redleap by carrying 13st 121b and winning an open steeplechase. O. Madden, the English jockey, received a present of £1000 for his win on Chaleureux in the Cesarewitch. The Victorian Sportsman Mr S. G. Cook is giving up his Sandringham establishment, and for the future his horses will always be located at Flemington. M. de Bremond, who won the French Derby this spring with Gardefeu and the valuable Prix Gladiateur with Elf, winner of the same race last year and of the Ascot Cup this year, was a few years back a clerk in an office earning a salary of £3 a week. He was one of the very few who have made money by backing horses, and now has one of the largest racing establishments on the Continent. Mr W. R. Wilson has sold Aurum's half-brother Auriferous (by Robinson Crusoe—Aura) to go to England. The horse's new owner is Mr Alison, who bought Aurum for Mrs Langtry. The Victorian starting machine seems to be gaining a firm hold in foreign countries. The latest is that two are in use in Russia and three in Germany. The Sydney sportsman Mr H. C. White is understood to have decided to mate his mare Georgic with the English stallion Orme at the conclusion of her racing career. The racehorse Eleusinian, who died in South Australia recently, was gelded on the same day, but could not rise after the operation. The veterin- | ary surgeon who had since made _ a post mortem examination has discovered an old injury to the spine and fracture of the lumbar vertebrae, which brought about paralysis when the horse was thrown. An item of new from Melbourne is to the effect that Reka is now well over the effects of his Caulfield Cup* accident, and is as fresh and lively as a two-year-old. j

Pelissier,.. brother to Amberite, who paid an unprofitable visit to the Victorian spring carnival, has been turned out for a lengthy spell at Bathurst, N.S.W. The Australian horse Patron, who went'to England some time ago, is announced to stand at- the Cobham stud next season at a fee of 50 guineas. Trenton's price is 100 guineas. The late Matthew Dawson's racing pictures were sold under the hammer a few days before the last mail left England, and 71 lots, of which a great number were engravings, brought £1084. A painting of Fisherman, who came to Australia in 1860, was sold for 57 guineas, while an original one of the great Eclipse realised 101 guineas. Mr W. Kelso has returned to Sydney from England. : Word from Sydney says that the buildings and grounds comprising the celebrated Kirkham. stud farm are skortty to be offered for sale, the present proprietor having altered- his mind about carrying the place on. According to latest London advices, the Cambridgeshire Stakes winner, Georgic, started at 40 to 1, and just squeezed home. Judging by the betting quotations, the New South Wales bred mnre was not fancied, and it seems as if her owner, Mr H. C. White, could have benefited little or nothing beyond the stake. The English bred stallion Meddler Avas sold by auction in New York a few Aveeks ago for 49,000 dollars, or, roughly, 9SOO guineas, the purchaser being Mr Sydney Paget, who was acting on behalf of Mr W. C. Whitney. Meddler, by St, Gatien, out of Busybody, formerly belonged to the late Mr Abington, and was sold after that gentleman's death for 14,500 guineas. The English horse Shaddock was sold a few weeks ago to the Russian Government. After Persimmon and i St. Frusquin he Avas regarded as the | best three-year-old of his year. ! St. Gatien, wdio ran a dead heat with ' The Harvester in the English Derby of I 188.4, was sold recently to Mr J. B. j Haggin. of America. Though the j horse was at the Cobham stud in Eng- I land, he Avas offered for sale at Morris j Park, in America, and after being ■ passed in Avas sold privately. Miss Russell, one of the greatest trotting brood mares in America, died at Woodburn Paddocks on September 20 at the advanced age of htirty-thrce ! years. Miss Russell Avas foaled in 1865, and Avas herself a very smart trotter. She had a numerous and dis- ; tinguished progeny, including Cora Belmont, Maud S. (the queen of the :. trotting track in her day), Nutbourne, j Pistachio and others. When last files left England. the j order among the Avinning stallions of i the season Avas Galopin, first; Bona I Vista, second; and St Simon, third: ! the respective amounts being £21,009, i £14,937 10s and £14,891. Galopin had eleven winners. Bona Vista eight, and I 3t. Simon tAA relve. The ill-luck that has attended the Hon. W. A. Long's turf ventures dur- j ing the past few years is still in cvi- \ dence, as Avord from Sydney states j that gentleman lost the services re- j eently of one of the finest-looking and j most promising colts he has ever bred. | The colt mentioned was a bay brother \ to Patron and Ruenalf, and it was ! Avhispered about that he avus a smash- [ er at home, and most likely to revive ] the fallen fortunes of the Chipping; Norton stables; but he got down in his box the other day and broke one of his thighs in such a manner as to preclude nil hope of his ever racing, j and little chance of his valuable life j being saved. j Now that England has entered into ; open riA-alry for the purchase of our j best racehorses there will in future : not be so many good performers sent j to India as formerly. There were fifteen starters for the Cesarewitch, in Avhich Merman ran ; third. Survivor, Aernena, and Form Avere amongst the unsuccessful competitors. \ English breeding experts express ' the opinion that- Persimmon will make j a grand stud horse. It is to be ob- | served that he is as near as possible i a perfect blend of all the merits of I the Galopin-St. Simon tribe, with the power, bone and equable temperament j of the stock of Melbourne, and of the \ three famous sons of Pocahontas, all : of whom, viz.. Stockwell, Rataplan and i King Tom. are brought together in j Persimmon's pedigree, while there are j two crosses of Melbourne through his j dam. j Tt is said that the monster stakes Avhich obtain in England tempt own- [ ers to run horses off their legs at the ; age of three, and then to put them to the stud at four, which, in the j opinion of many excellent authorities, j is too early an age for the purpose.] Some .years ago an excess of two-year- j old running was the chief evil en- j dured by racehorses; but now, al- j though this still goes on, the horses suffer from the additional misfortune of an even greater tax upon their poAvers at the age of three. Galtee More and Persimmon are the latest instances in point.

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MISCELLANEOUS., Auckland Star, Volume XXIX, Issue 286, 3 December 1898

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MISCELLANEOUS. Auckland Star, Volume XXIX, Issue 286, 3 December 1898

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