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THE EPSOM DERBY.

PERSIMMON'S VICTORY.

UNPARALLELED ENTHUSIASM ON

THFi RACECOURSE.

Tzri first great piece of luck the Prince of Wales has had since bis connection with the English turf, came to him on June 3rd at Epsom, when his colb Persimmon won for him the Derby of 1896. Royalty has had no turf honours until the present) since George IV. before his accession to the throne, 108 years ago, won the Derby with Sir Thomas. The weather was hob and oppressive, although there were showers during the morning. The rain had not affected tho course to any appreciable degree, and it was pronounced the hardest on record.

The victory of Persimmon caused a scene of unparalleled enthusiasm about the racecourse. Tbe Prince ef Wales wm greatly pleased. Ib was with difficulty fcho police and others were able to mako way for him to meat the returning; horae. The Prince personally led Persimmon to the weighing room amid the greatest excitomonfi and loud cheering, tie started racing in 1877, bub was nerer very successful till 1895. Tbe Derby Stake for 1896 was worbh 6,000»ovs, and the terms of the race were aa follows : —Three-year-old colts to carry 125 pounds, and fillies 121 pounds; nominator of tbe winner to receive 500aovs, and the owner of the second horse 200aov» out of tbo Btakoß, distance about one and a half miles. St. Fruequin came in second. The finish was co close as to cause much comment, only the judge being in a poeitton to tell accurately which was the winner, and many persons thoughb St. Frusquin had crossed the line ahead. Persimmon, however, woo by aboub a neck. The news of the victory caused great excitement in London. There were large crowds of people at Victoria. Station and along the road to Marlboiough House.to witness the retuin of the royal party. During the evening, commencing at 8.50, bhe Prince gave a dinner to tbe members of the Jockey Club, the banquab being one of the most sumptuous and brilliant served ab Marlborough for many years past. A superb silver service, valued at from £20,000 to £40,008 was used, and the tideboard was burdened bith racing and yachting cups, trophies of the Prince's victories on land and water.

Seldom has there been such excitement in England. A* tor tha Prince of Wo lee, ho ia simply overpowered with applause every time he shows himself in public, and telegrams are still pouring in to Marlborough House congratulating him upon the success of his stable. The Queen, Emperor William, the Czar, and moat of the crowned head* have telegraphed their congratulations. Letters have been written bo the press about) Peraimmon, and the editorial writers continue to comment upon the event with gust and fuleomenesa. The only discordant voice came from Scotland, where the Rev. Mr Fergus, at a mooting of the Religious Tracb Society, suggested thafe they eend colportseurfl to Epsom in order to induce the Prince ef Wales, and incidentally lord Rosebery, to try for a higher race than the Derby. Thero it nob the slightest grsund for suspicion that the race was not won on its merits, after a most difficult finish.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18960718.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE EPSOM DERBY., Auckland Star, Volume XXVII, Issue 168, 18 July 1896

Word Count
528

THE EPSOM DERBY. Auckland Star, Volume XXVII, Issue 168, 18 July 1896

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