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San Francisco Mail News.

- ' ' ; . THE DERBY. !

Vi--.-bright sunshine and gentle breeze _ ~ hi)' a ! very lar£° crowd of people to I Ibowns on May 29th. The scene ■ a most brillianb one when the Royal *8.. arrived on a special train aboub noon. J* nSrty included the Duke of Cambridge, i, Duke '"'and Duchess of Saxe-Coburg- • .L fl the Duke and Duchess of Con--6 "hV the Duke and Duchess of York, ..."nuke and Duchess of Teck, and other ' mbera of the Royal Family.' Nasrulla 2?^ . tha second son of the Ameer of Afehanistßo" who accompanied the Prince Wales, and his suite, was the centre of tuchattraction. - • ;■■■'■ "'in tbe enclosure where the rticea started tsflToLord Rosebery, the Earl of Cork and rkiv -Duke of Westminster, Duko of Krb, Duke of Sb. Albans, Duke of Sd-Mn. Prince Soltykoft', Earl of Mogan, Earl of Coventry, Marquis of Zetland and tho Earl of Durham. Amoricaas held a'foremost place in the the grounds, and; ib is said, Lfe "unusually fortunate irrtlie day's bet■the race is described as' oho of the mosb important Derbys in years, and the owner of'iS'T. yisto» w^° aa more t^ian twice owned » "classic " winner, is said to be ,ithe luckiest man in England." There , latels starters, as follows :—Beck Hamptjn Curzon, Gallopian,' Sir-Ki.k Connell, "■'jjij.pirl,Lavino, Levar, Raconteur, Sir. nuto Slowstep, Solaro, Ghibabos, The . jtaok,1. VilHeres, and. Saivington. The batting at the start was 9 to 1 against Sir tisto, 33 to 1 against Curzon, and 100 to 8 jjginaV. Kirk Connell. Mr Brassen's Cbibabos led until the horses were descending the hill, .when General Randolph's The Brook took a slight lead. On turning into . tho Straight, A. D. Cochrane'sßeck Hampton took up tho running, followed by T. Cannon's Curzon, but inside the disbance Lofdßosebery'- Sir Visto came along with sr.tfcle, -and won in 2min 43 2-s_b sec. S. Loatesrode Sir Visto. Curzon, ric'den by ] Ch-lloner, was second, and Sir J. Blundell Maple's Kirk Connoll, ridden by Bradford, third. Fairies Solaro was fourth. Sir Visto was trained by Matt Dawson. He ran well in the Two Thousand guineas, bo. was two lengths behind Laveno at the finieb.. Kirk Connell, the, third horse, was originally the property of W. A. Cooper, bat-was purchased recently by Maple for 5000 guineas. He wenb into the 2,000 guineas race, and defeated H.AlcCalmont'B .Raconteur and Rosebery's Sir Visto. All calculation., were upset by the perform■:'wees''of.' Kirk Connell, Sir Visto and Raconteur, and when Kirk Connell ran B„pi_ced in the Nowmarkob Stakes, and ■ thab event was edsily captured by another ioreeiof Maple's',,The Owl, the prophets tfe.e moire at sea'than ever. The victory ofSirVisto was the occasion for a demonifcration equal to that which greeted Rosebery's Ladas last year. The Prince of Wales was cheered when his two-year-old bay colt Courtier, by Himpton. out of Marguerite, won the Caterham Plate earlier, in the day. The Cai-rffara Plate is a 2,00030v5< event for two - year-olds and fillies. Originally, Ri._»rd Cioker's Belle Meade, Montauk, Richard HI., and Matty Bump (dead), were entered for this events All the Ainon.an horses wero scratched, .it-is estimated that there were more tnan 1,00. m.n and women from America en the ground when tho first race of the day was called.:. .'..... PASSING OF THE DUKE OF HAMILTON. William Alexander Louis Stephens Dougfl_9.?amilton, bom March 12th, 1845, ia repQ-l-d, May 17th, dead ab Algiers. Ho wai;fcke premier duke of Scotland, the lerfiiitary keeper of Holy wood Palace. Deceaeatl succeeded his father as twelfth _in_e of Hamilton and ninth Duke of Bran.dOKonJuly 15tb, 1863. He had no less ;than sixteen titles, and there was no prouder 'ptdigre. than' that of the Hamilton, tracing it. {descent aa far back as the thirteenth v_eat-ry;from the Douglasses of Wallace and Brace/ and repeatedly including royal names; The ducal estates in''Scotland feoVered an area of 157,384 acres, yielding a gross.rental of £140,000. The English -estates were jj.ooo acres in Suffolk. Bub as faciack as 1770, bad blood showed itself in the family, and matters went from bad to worse. Lord Arthur Pelham died in Paris in 1863, after a life of dissipation. He left three children, one of which, a daughter, married'the hereditary Prince of Monaco, and left him'a eleven years later to espouse a Connb Festebics. Ot ber two brothers, tho elder one sowed a tremendous crop of wild oat 3in England and France, and got badly ■entangled with the -noneylender.. In 1880, I the Dtike discovered a deficit of £1,500,000 i andrevolted. .To raise the requisite, funds it became necessary to dispose of property, and in June, 1882, the greatest sale ■ of! modern times took place in the auctionrooms" of Christie and Mansbn, London,; where the Duke's library, pictures, furni-. tare, etc., were sold, realising - over | £1.000,000. The deceased Duke waa mar-j riedin-lß73,to<thfe eldest daughter of the j Dokef of Manchester, and leaves a daughter. j Tho surviving brother is unmarried, and j thus it is likely that the title will die oub! .with the laeb two of a once greab and noble ] family, ;y '■■;.'' ■. j [ Sob-equenb particulars of the Duke's deatlvare.to tho effect;; thab ib was due to | ■' biiriting.'".. lie had succeeded in lighten-! ink hiinseif of about 60 pounds, but the pro- j ces. was too much for his vitality, and he eoccumbed in spite of- the efforts which werefmado to save his life by those who Bup.rvi.rtd the reduction treatment. U-ad'y ,_,.-ry Hamilton, the young daughter'of the late Duke* will be the ''.heat peeress in England, and probably in the world. She ia only 10 yeai;s of age, and has inherited•: tho bulk of the lafo Duko's .estnto, Including the Isle-of Arran, which slono" is worth~£l,ooo.ooo. The whole of ft.Bß.Duke of Hamilton's property was at his own* di?poßnl t - and . tho rentals already .mount to £200,000 a year. ■■■■!_ ■'■ The presenb Duke of, Hamilton inherits %niijton Place and barely enough to supfort the title. _—• THE SALMON TRADE. ;,The rapid inroads which the hailing arid Packing companies have made in the supply ?f.almon tn the Alaskan rivers, has given great concern to the Governmenb for several Jsir-'ptigb; since it became ■"evident that Iho* fij<h were destined to "-<-X termination. Morothan half of tho salmon pack of the United States, and nearly "half of the world, supply, now comes from Alaska. The;: Capital invested in these fisheries amounts to $3,000,000, and the value of the .baton's catch, not including the manufactured products therefrom,: comes to about .2,000,000. Tho salmon' companies/ are Squiring muoh land ab the mouth? of the -livers where they are engaged, and pretempting sbrategetical points for future commerce; Interesting breach of promise case. V H the cose of Miss " Birdie "Sutherland. a chorus girl in the Gaiety Theatre, against Dudley Churchill Majoribanks, eldest son of Baron Tweed mouth, for breach ot pro-. wise ever comes to trial, it will (according .to a London despatch. May 18th) be bbc most sensational affair fince Miss Fortescue (the actress), won £10,000 from Lord Oar",inoyle on. a similar charge. . Miss blitheriland is very handsome, being nearly six feot tall, and only 18 years old. Her real naino is Annie Louise Watkins. She nrec met Dudley Majoribanks ab the Prince ot CJub. lb was a case of love ab "first eij/ht. It is said thab he pro..posed and was accepted, bub that ■-When his parents learned of the afhu'r tbey were very much disturbed. Mr Marjori;i>aiikd wont to Canada nn a visit wibh h's

Si toS^ r! 0f Aberdeen, GovernorGeneral of Canada.' The young man did nob return with hia mother to England, but remained in Canada, and the match was broken ofL Miss Sutherland then placed bhe case in the' hands of a well-known '~a. l lawyer, who retained in her behalf- S,r Edward Clarke, who defended Uscar Wilde in his recenb trial. C. F. brUi. who appeared against Wilde on behalf oi the Ireasury, and several other legal lights have also been retained. BALLINGTON BOOTH BECOMES AX- AMERICAN. Commander Ballington Booth and his witOf of the Salvation Army, renounced their allegiance to Queen Victoria in Jersey .■City,.May 23rd, and became citizens of the United States. The acb would have been more impressive if the Salvationists had forsworn .heir country on the day following ■ the anniversary of Her Majesty's birthday. They missed a point, as these people are always posing for effective publicity. , . 81-METALISM. IN AMERICA. The financial question, which is likely to be a leading one in the nexb Presidential campaign in the United States—mouometalism v. • bi-metalism—is already being publicly discussed. Carlisle, Secretary of the Treasury, addressed a large Convention ab Memphis on May 28th in favour of a gold standard and against the free coinage of silver. The monometalisbs term their policy one of "sound money "'; the silveribes retort with the term " honesb money" as a political watchword. CAUGHT AT T.AST. On the wharf of the shop of .John RNeal and Co., according to a Boston tele* gram (May 22nd), is whab fishermen firmly believe to be tbe. only and original senserpent. Ib was brought in on Monday by the schooner Mary Cabral. , It is aboub five and abalf feeb long, wibh a round snake-like body, surmounted tho whole length by a fin eight inches in height Ib has an. enormous tail. The jaws aro seven inches long, and contain three rows of teetb, the first being aboub an inch long, and different from any teeth which the fishermen had ever seen. They are flab and blade-like, sharp ab the points, almosb branslucenb, and slightly flexible. The creature was taken in a trawl on the "Have Bank," after a desperate tight. HARCOURT LOSES HIS TEMPER. In the House of Commons, May 10th« Sir Donald Home McFarlane (Liberal), member for Argyleshiro, after receiving on evasive reply bo this question when the Crofters' Bill would bo taken up, threatened that the Scotdh members would withdraw their support from the Government. This caused tho Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir William Vernon Harcourt to reply, in a towering rage, thab ib was open to bhe Scotch Members to do as they pleased. Thereupon, Donald McGregor (Liberal), member for Invernesshire, retorted : Are we to understand that the Government is going to show the white feather to tho Opposition? Tho Chancellor of bb3 Exchequer made no reply. Hnrcouro-was worried again by rDr. Donald Macgrogor, May 20th, on the same subject. Harcourb replied that he would make a statement on Thursday, 25th. Macgregor angrily exclaimed: "That is nob good for me," and the House shouted with laughter as he arose and paced the gangway with stately step, stood in the centre passageway, bowed solemnly to tho Speaker, and, turning his back on the chair, walked out of the House. Macgregor is an open exponent of bhe dissatisfaction of certain of the Scotch Liberals at the shelving of Scotch in the House. He resigned his seat on the 21st. The Liberal wire-pullers are working hard to got him to re consider his action, especially asthe Government'- majority the night before, in the debate on ; the Welsh Church Disestablishment Bill, was reduced to nine, . r , -~,,.■ MISCELLANEOUS. '#%.> The total realised by tbe sale of the art treasures of the late Mrs Lynd Stephens, in London, May 24th, was £141,000. Mrs Stephens waa formerly a well-known French dancer, and retired from the stage to marry the late Lynd Stephens, who waa a wealthy member of Parliament. She became renowned for her charitable actions, giving larg6 sums of money to various charitable institutions. 'Bicycle riders have been granted the privilege of Hyde Park. Viscount Hinton, who for many years has been grinding an organ throughout the Btreets of London, is now acting as showman for a kinetoscope, near Leather Lane, Holborn. Hinton is heir apparonb to the Earl of Ponlett, his-father is the sixth earl of that name. The earldom of Ponlett was created in 1706. _ _ . The yachting season in British waters was opened in the Thameß, May I7tb, with matches under the auspices of the new Thames Yacht Club, and was continued on tho 19tU under the Royai Thames Yacht Club. The Ailsa, Britannia and the new Valkyrie 111. were objects of interest in view of the challenge for the America's cup; but English yachting sharps say the cup is beyond the reach of either the Ailsa or Valkyrie 111. Hoveshoii's work (the American boat), ib is declared, will outsail either Watson's or Fife's creations. '-' '■■.'■"'. , . j James Bailley, Conservative, was elected to Parliament in .he Walworth division of Newington, May 14th, over Co). J. Calquohon Read, Liberal. Col. Williams, Conservative and Unionist, was elected same date for the west division of Donib, over G. Wood Homer, Independent, The statement was made in support of the candidacy of Col. Williams thab the Chancellor; of the Exchequer had refused to grant; money for bhe relief of the English agriculturists, bub was prepared nob only to five ud three weeks of tho Parliamentary time, bu. t6 vote to £2,500,000, of public money, to the relief of the Irish tenants. Homer was regarded as an Independent agricultural candidate. The Queen returned to Windsor Castle from London, May 9th. On Tuesday, May 21st, she will remove the Court to Balmoral, where she will remain for a month. The Princess of Wales will ho Id the remaining two drawing-rooms. The Princess is greatly changed, and now loo^s like an old woman. The Duke of baxe Coburg-Gotha is attending very many public functions, and seems ' specially anxious to win public favour. He is afraid ofthec6ntinued growling of the Radicals nnd others over the pension which he receives from British taxpayers. On May 7th the "Pall Mall Gazette printed a column article, alleged to be based on police inquiries, suggesting thab an ex-soldier named Grainger, a native ot Cork, is the real' "Jack the Ripper. Grainger is now serving a ton-years term of penal servitude for stabbing a woman in tho Whitechapel district lasb March. John Burns, the labour leader member of Parliament, was hooted while making a speech on labour day in .Hyde Park, and with' cries of "Why didn't you support KeirHardie," " traitor," etc. Burns said, "If you don't want to hear me, 111 go home.'' -This was followed by cries of "Co home, you're no working-man !"_ The sale of the jewels and racing cups ol the late Duchess of Montrose, known in sporting circles as " The Red Buchess, who raced horses under bhe name of Mr Manton," took place May Ist and realised over £25,000. *» A celebrated, pearl necklace was sold according to the terms of her wid for the benefit of thpvppor of East London. It As knocked down at £11,200 amicLan excited crowd of would-be buyers.- This necklace ia composed of seven rows containing 3G2 finely graduated pearls with.a diamond clasp. The mate of the .necklace for size, colour, faultless matching and evmmetry, can hardly be found. ..

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Bibliographic details

San Francisco Mail News., Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 146, 20 June 1895

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2,462

San Francisco Mail News. Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 146, 20 June 1895

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