Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

MEETINGS TO COME.

r„_ _mb<;r22 and 24 - Wellington R.C. Spring Etenfcer* ™d M-Fcildinf. J.C. Spring n«. l-Avondale J.C, Spring C _--o.alu.hu and Onehunga Racinjc Club December 22- Niraruawahia Racing Club !>««• mbor 26-Alexandra Annual Meeting Dccombor26-MataDmla Racing Club rv_ n ,her26--Opot ki ItECint: Club 8 en ber 26-WairenKaa-Hika Jockey Clab -nl ffi-Palmcrston R.C. Summer n'o-e "6—Taranaki J.C. uoi'lli .27-Tliamos .1.0. Summer n& Pd'and27—Mimawatu R.C.Summer {...ember 26, January 1 and 2-Auckland Doe. 27 and 30 — Auckland Trotting Club Summer ■ t )EC 27_.VaipawaR.O. Summer i.» r i.mber2_-T_)rnry Racing Club n£,'j»_Sourh Auckland R.C. Summer rlhliiiry I—Lichfield Annual Meeting jiumary 1- w hatowhata Racing Club Tnntuu-y 1-Onnor.d Jockej- Club Ear? 1 find 2—Rangitikei R.C. Summer M wary 10,11 - Poverty Hay Turf Club 1 inftrirr 22. 2. -Wellington Racing Club t .niiar. 26.29— Takapuna J.C. Summer Suary 2-Ca« torbury J.C. Summer *.__■ I3andll—Eßmonf. R.C. Summer |il__ 20 and 21—Taranaki .T.O. Autumn Feb' 20.21 and 23—Dunedin J.C. Autumn ./lurch 17-Faps.kura Kncing Club Anrii 15 and 16--Auckland R.C. Autumn M ay 18 21— Takapuna Jockey Club Jaiic 9,11-Auckland Racing Club DATiiS OS? COMING EVENTS, tiflcember 26—Auckland Cup January 1-Great Northern Derby fanuai-V 2—Auckland Steeplechase January 22- Wellington Cup

An Attractive programme has been drawn tfn for the Otahuhu and Onehunga Racing Club Soring Meeting. Nominations close at Mr Blomfield's office on Friday nighb next. The full lisb of events appears elsewhere. ' Lottie ia suffering from soreness owing to the hard state of the ground ab Ricearton. Three Star has been senb to Whibford Park, where he will remain for a lengthened spoil. • Mr S. Hordern's shipment of trotting stock to be sold during the forthcoming Auckland racing carnival will arrive here early nexb month from Sydney. i Messrs Nathan's brood mare Bollona (by Nelson—MusUerina) has produced a colb' foal to Sb. Hippo. So sooner are one years Cup and Derby over than speculation begins on the nexb, year's double Aftor tho recent meeting .Wallace and Harvesber and Challenger and Harvester were backed ab 1,000 to 5 for bhe 1895 events.

! Koscius will very likely develop into one of the besb steeplechasers the colony has iever soon. So' says tho Canterbury J> Times." Ab Messrs Yuille and Co.'s sale of thorough bred b during the Melbourne Cup -wqek, Mr D. O'Brienpurchased a two-year-old colb by Carbine, oub of Sb. Odelle, for 38te. The "Sportsman" thus refers to f_ho purchase:—He is a lovely colt, and awfully like the great champion, even to 'bis faults, for he is like he was ab that age —a little black under the knee, but he is topped and quartered like him, and his marks are very similar. Mr Dan O'Brien was nob to be "denied, and got him singularly cheap at 380gs, and, no doubb, he will pay him handsomely with only ordinary luck. Racing in olden timeß -.—Honour and glory, 1; spore, 2 ; stakes, 3. Nowadays : -Tatb's sweep, 1 ; stakes, 2 ; hang tho public, 3.—" Bulletin." The Victorian Steeplechase horse King Louis met with such a serious accident in the V.R.C. Steeplechase thab it was deemed advisable to destroy him. The following are the leading prizewinners und amounts won at the V.R.C. sprino- meeting :—Messrs F. W. Purches, £3,580 ;0. S. Cook, £1,705; W. R- Wil,«on, £1,225; J. Patterson, £1,000; J. Mc.Swceney, £700 ;J. J. McManus, £655 ; S. Miller, £530; C. L. Balfour, £500; P. T. •fleywood, £490 ;S. H. Golian, £330. Mr D. O'Brien's cheque only amounted to £120. .

Mr D. O'Brien's colb Philson (by Tasman —Rose and Black) won the Prince of Wales Stakes, one mile, ab the Williamstown races on bhe 9bh November. Philson started ab 7 to 1.

Merganser is in work again, and ib is quite likely sho will be seen with the colours ur> in the autumn.

The value of the nexb Now Zealand Cup will probably bo £2,000. The Club will appropriate the sweep money. Says the Canterbury " Times " :—Considering the rumours thab were current concerning the running of a certain horse in the New Zealand Cup, the authorities failed in their duty in nob holding an inquiry. Referring to the concluding day's racing •of the V.R.C. Spring Meeting, an Australian writer says: Tho V.R.C. Handicap was accorded to Loyalty, if the betting is •any guide; bub Mr O'Brien'B hor_e was not -equal to the occasion, as he finished second to Quiver, with Straightflro third. The performance of the winner was one of the most meritorious of the meeting, as she won from post to post in tho creditable time of ~3,rain 43ec. Taking a lino through bhis race ■tho Oaks was a perfect gift to Quiver had Mooro not stopped ab the post, and tho 'transaction which cost that ridor his license is never likely bo bo forgotten by the stewards of the V.R.C. '

JVlr Melhuiah, the Melbourne veterinary surgeon, was called in to examine Ruenalf Ofi.r his running in the Royal Park Stakes. Mr Molhuiah found the horso so lame as to require a long rest and cureful treatment. Four-year-oldd havo scored the majority

•of victories in England this year. Mr David Taib, senior, of Queonsland,_as had the misfortune bo lose lus trotting stallion, Builder, whose progeny is distributed all over tho colonies. Builder was tt. bay horse, foalod in 1883, by the imported American trotting stallion Contractor, from Robecca, by Panic, and was bred by Mr J. J. Miller, of Bays water stud farm, Victoria. Tlae Melbourne Cup has nob favoured four-year-olds in tho past, only seven of thab age having been successful in 33 years. Patron makes the eighth. He carried 131b itr.oro than any other of his age to victory in that race, since the year 1868, when Mr TaiC'rf Glencoo had 9sb 111b (including 71bpenalty). Malv.'io won with Ssb 41b, aod Mentor with Bsb 3lb. Camden (Bsb 71b). Musidora (Ssb 51b), The Ace (Bsb 41b), and Carbine (10st) each ran placed as four-yiw-olds. Pierre Lorillard's floating stable ia quite a new departure. Ho lives in the winter

on a mosb luxurious houso-boab 130 feeb in

length, in which he goes from place to .place in the shallow waters of Florida. Hib stable-boat makes his establishment com-1 plete lb is a queer-looking craft indeed, ._ome77 feeb long and 15J feet broad, with a Jong deck structure, to be used as a carriage house. Ib_3 nob a pretty crafb by any mean?. Thero are four regularly built box stalls under the deck for as many horse?.and the ijassage between them may bo utilised when needful for two more, so that «jr hor_.es in all aro provided for. The success of New Zealand-bred horses 'abroad, whether on the tarf or ab the stud, is always? m item of interest, and everybody will bo pleased to learn bhat Sir Modred top_ tho list of winning sires in America for the paßb seaeon. According to latest)

fileß tbe progeny of the son of Traducer bad secured 80;695dol. ; bub written advices state that since thab amount was published they have considerably increased it. Dr. Pickwick comes next wibh 83,940d01, Darebin 55,410d01, Sir Henry Dixon 55,080d01, Himyar'; __9,535d01, Hanover 46,425d01, and Cheviot 39,090d01.......... Formosa, .the dam of Ensign, who won the V.R.C. Derby of 1888,' has been'sent on a vi3ic to the famous old sire Grandmasber, ab Duckenfield Park.

Mr Byron Moore estimates thab bhe attendance at Flemington on Melbourne Cup day was fully 90,000. What an aristocratic gentleman Norton is, to be. sure, over fences (writes " Cranbrook"). Mr S. H. Gollan made no mistake when he purchased the son of Ascob, who, for my parb, would nob have surprised me had he won the Steeplechase on Saturday wibh the steadier of 13st 21b. No horse in the race jumped better or was going stronger ab the finish.

Colonel North and Mr J. A. Miller are the best patrons the different racing clubs in England have, and it is amusing to see thorn running up each other's selling platers when they win. A little feud exists between bhem, the outcome of which benefits the cluba, as they bid in hundreds, irrespective of results or what it costa them. Dan Page, who is at preeent in Melbourne wibh Mr S. H. Gollan's horeeß, will accompany them to England. Ib is understood that Mr C. M. Lloyd and other prominent owners are thinking about sending a competent team of equines with Mr Gollan's bo compete in England., -

Thirty hands are always employed at I Flemington all the year round—gardeners, painters, carters. Ib takes four men three 1 yeara to do all the painting at Flemington. I When they have finished they commence ( again. The 4J miles of training track require yearly 3,400 loads of sand and tan - and ashes to keep them in. good order. The _ ladies' rooms have been specially decorated ! this season. A 25fb sundial on the Hill, - the hours planted in flowers, is an artistic . novelty, the joinb production of Mr Byron Moore and Mr Ellery. i Crediting Mr M'Calmont with £11,302 I by hia success in the Jockey Club Stakes at < Newmarket, Isinglass has broughb his winnings this season up to £31,498, and if to this sum be added bhe amount he won as a three-year-old (£18,860), and as a juvenile (£4,577), we have the large total of £54,935. This comes very near the record of Donovan, who won in stakoa £55,154 10s, the largest amounb ever credibed bo a single racehorse. We are face to face with a most important facb. St. Simon broke down before hia third year waa properly through. Ormonde, bofore the ond of his fourth, was a hopeless roarer. Isinglass neither breaks down nor roar?. He has won three ten-thousand-pounders besides the triplo ovenb, and appears to be going better than over. There is every reason to believe that he will run in bhe Ascot Cup next year, and, it ho does so, tbe record will be bad to boab. Nad a is bhe first mare to.get a place in . the Melbourne Cup since Grace Darling's second to Sheet Anchor in 1885. Briseis won in 187G, she being bhe only mare ever successful in the race ; and in that year another three-year-old filly was second in Sybil. The three placed ones wGre on this occasion all gob by Tim WhifHer, Briseia, and Sybil being by the English horse of thab name, and Timothy by bhe son of New Warrior", bred in this colony. Ben Bolb, the winner of the Caulfield Cup of 1886, is still running on the Indian turf. At a meeting of the Committee who had charge ol the subscriptions raised for the widow of tho late T. Corrigan, ib was reported that. £2,160 had been collected, but .a few more pounds were still to come in. Ib was decided to invest the amounb in approved Melbourne securities. Mr S. Bradley's cheque at the C.J.C. ; Meeting amounted to £1,157 2s. He topped : the liab of winning owners. Mr G. G. Stead 1 comes next with £960 9s. The Sydney betting market (says the 1 " Sportsman's" correspondent) is a poor I index these times of whab is probable or possible a3 to finalibies ab Melbourne. One . time, and nob 60 very many yeara ago either, the local market was, if anything, the better guide. Now—well, the least '. said the better. . A very few puntera take hundreds to five or seven, and a still fewer

owners take 500 to 25 or 35, bub the days when a big stable move meant first favouritism, have apparently.gone for ever. I mind well a day, aboub seven yeara ago, when bhe late "lamented James White wanted to back a mare of his, who shall for tho nonce bo nameless, for a big race at Rand wick. He did nob go splashing round Tatb's, but simply senb for Charlie Westbrook — senb a civil note asking the little leviathan to meet him ab the Union Club. Charlie toddled upstairs, talked five minutes to Mr White and a couple of intimates, merely " asked for tho market," and laid the Squire of Kirkham. £6,000 to £600 aboub bhe mare. Thab was ioo'sb satisfactory to her owner and his friends, and also to tho then champion cash fielder, who walked into Tatb's and calmly backed it back, mosb of ib aba bebter price. The mare won, and _o did Wesbbrook— heavily. Those days have apparently gone for over, for, nowadays, if a commissioner, an owner, or a bookmaker who has overlaid ib puts £50 on a horse, he's ab eighb's before you can epic on your bands. Bonnie Scotland was so badly hurb through being galloped on in tho V.R.C. Derby thab ib was found necessary bo scratch him for the Cup. The N.S.W. stallion Moorhouse, by Moorthorpe from Geraldine, has been purchased by the Indian Governmenb for sfcud

Trenton beat the imported Eiridspord in tho thoroughbred stallion class ab Geelong show a few days ago, the former being placed firsb and tha other second. Mr G. G. Stead has won the UJ.O Derby five times during the lasb ejght Writes our London correspondent .—The •« little bib of splosh " into which Mr Harry McCalmonb will, like the hero of " E Dunno Where 'c Are," come next Tuesday, amounts, 'tis stated, to over four millions Bterlincr. This is the fortune wntch hia grand-uncle loft him in 1887. .: The terms of tho will wero that the young man should have the use of certain limited suma lor seven years and thab then if alive, lie should inherit tho whole. If he died the money went to three other McCalmonts, who will now be dependent on hia generosity. Mr McCalmont, though eenerous and open-handed in legitimate ways, is a very Borewd young man and nob the leaab likely to fall a victim to the blandishments of either beggars or bookmakers. His bets are confined to very modest proportions, and since he haa been on the turf his horses have a great ceal, more than paid their way. For example, Isinglass alone is credited with winnings in stakes of £53,000 odd and old could be sold any day for £15,000, for stud purposes. Since he vißited your part of the world, Mr McCalmont is, of course, much changed. He has filled oub, and «rown a beard, and looks a his thirty years. Moreover, life is nob all roso-colour even to a auabrillionaire. To recover the / beloved wife he losb nob long ago, Mr McCalmonb would readily sacrifice all his m Since Patron threw all his previous good deeds in the shade by winning the Melbourne Cup, people who had not an opportunity of seeing him scoub the idea of his being tho possessor of a v bowed tendon,. or being otherwise infirm. On the subject of his ailment, however, "Asmodous, ni tho " Leader "sayß:- M lb is all the more difficult to account for Pabron a spasmodical display, because ol the trouble his near foreleg haa been giving his trainer ; the tendon is plainly bowed, and ib ia very

apparent that the disfigured limb musb give way sooner or later. Mr _Purche3 must be accounted extremely lucky in being able to secure 3,500 soys by the aid of such a frail combination of bone and sinew." ''Terlinga," in the " Australasian," has it:— '." Anyone looking at Patron would say he is the possessor of a bowed tendon. Ab Rand wick, in September, an expert, who looked him over on behalf of a would-be purchaser, bold hia principal thab he had one of tho worse bowed tendons he had ever seen, and a breakdown mighb be expected ab any time."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18941121.2.13.2

Bibliographic details

MEETINGS TO COME., Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 278, 21 November 1894

Word Count
2,585

MEETINGS TO COME. Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 278, 21 November 1894

Working