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ENGLISH NOTES.

(From Our Special Correspondent.)

London, July 6.

THE DEFEAT OF LADAS.

You wSI have heard by cablegram of the defeat) of^Jf-emier's hitherto invincible colb LadaaSptch took place ab iNewmarket yesterday fifths new ten thousand pound stake run over the Bunbury mile and named after H.R.H. the Princess of Wales. The weather was superb (blazing in fact) and despite Henley Regabba, a very large company assembled on the pretty July course to witness this moat interesting event. The Prince of,.^Vales and Duke of Cambridge were present and could be , t |gen strolling, aboub and HompJeMed as g Royalties only can at. c Newmarket The Duke Expressed himself, confident <pf Ladaa victory, bub bhe Princejt mindful of s the luck of millionaires in these levjabban stakes, had his modest » pony " (£25) on Isinglass. Seven runners wenb to the posb, and it will be strange if we see a better field out this season. First, there was Isinglass (_yrs, 10sb 31b), winner of last year s triple crown, bub not supposed by the public to be in form Then came Mr Rose's Ravensbury (4vrs, 9st 111b), fresh from bis Ascot defeat of La Fleche, and the lucky Dukes Raeburn (4yrs, 10st) who lowered the colours of Isinglass ab Manchester last aubumn. The Duke of Westminster sent BuUingdcm (3yrs, Bsb 131b) said to have been foughing a. Epsom. Mr Douglas Baird was represented by Sb. Florian, and General Owen Williams started the speedy sprinter Priestbolmo to make the running for Isinglass. Betting opened ab 3t04 on Ladas, but so greab was the run on Lord Rosebery'scolt that 2 to lon was finally freely laid. Ab firsb Isinglass stood at 7 a„d Ravensbury at 8 to 1, bub when the flags fell 100 to 12 could have been gob aboub either. A few people book 10 to 1 Raeburn, bub Sb. Florian at 33 to 1, and Bullingdon ab 50 bo 1 were friendless. The face was a complete surprise.. According to Captain Machell's instructions Priestholme made the running a "cracker, and Raeburn and Ravensbury were beaten at the bottom of the hill. Watts then sent Lada- to the front, and for a few seconds his success was loudly acclaimed. Ha If wav up the hill, however, Isinglass challenged, and in less time than ib takes to W rite the favourite was nob only beaten by

him, bub passed by Bullingdon also. The " boy in yellow " then devobed himself bo lasb year's Derby hero, and a bremendous finish reßulbed in the victory of Isinglass by a shorb head, bhe pulling-up Ladas being a bad bhird. Unless Bullingdon's Derby form was all wrong, the running in this race must be ignored. Nevertheless, the Leeer betting has been revolutionised, 7 to 4 being now betted againsb instead of on Ladas. YEARLING SALES. The July bloodstock salea for 1894 will be memorable in turf history by the fact that they brought about the utter dispersal of three of the most famous studs in England. The Royal stud, which had existed ab Hampbon Courb for half a century, went to pieces under the hammer on Saturday, and Monday Baw the final ecabtering of Mr Manbon's famous establishment, and the realisation of some of bhe money tho late Mr Abington Baird sunk in bloodstock during his brief inglorious career. Theße latter sales took place ab Newmarket, and attracted a goodly muster of buyers, including many Oonbinenbal pillars of the turf; and the prices realised show that there is plenty of money still _ forthcoming for really high quality in sires, dams and promising young.stock. The aalea opened in the usual quiet fashion with "job lots," £110 being the highest figure in the firsb half dozen. Then came the Abington yearlings, bub buyers were very shy until a smarb looking colb by Juggler oub of bhe famous Spinaway, was led to the ring. Spirited bidding quickly put ite price up to 400gB, and at that figure Sir James Miller became the colt'a owner. The late proprietor of Bedford Lodge'e brood mare and foals were submitted next, and a colb foal by Merry" Hampton, bhe 1887 Derby winner, having been boughb by Captain Machellfor 520gs, buyers were asked to make a figure for the mare Superba and her filly foal by Wisdom. Mr T. Caatle conquered opposition ab 1,750 guineaa for bhe mare and 610 for the foal. The famoua Buaybody, by Petrarch oub of Spinaway, waa next submibted, and bri«k competition lefb Sir Blundel Maple in possession ab 3,500 guineas. A filly foal by bhe Derby dead-heaber Sb. Gatien out of this grand mare was then boughb by Mr Hamar Bass for 930 guineas, and Count Lehudorf became proprietor of bhe mare Hazledell, by Hermib, ab 500, ab which price The Hag fell bo Captain Green. Later in the day the stallions were sold. Merry Hampton realised 1,550 guineas, and Juggler, by Toncheb—Enchantress, 1,750. The remaining four only brought in 61 guineas. Thirby-six animals were disposed of aba botal of 13,111 guineas, or ab an average of something like £370 each. The Sefbon Stud, consisting of 50 mares, foals, and stallions, sold extremely well. The first on the ring was Agneta, by Macaroni—Fair Agnes, which, with a filly foal by Triatran, fetched 1,500 guineas; Antibe'B, by Isonomy out of St. Marguerite, an own sister to the famous Seabreeze, brought 1,850 guineaa, and Sir James Miller gave 1,200 for Desdemona, a mare by St. Simon, which never made a name on the turf. Corrie Roy was sold cheap to Sir B. Maple ab 850, bub in paying 2,800 for Hyeres, by Isonomy, and her Macheath foal, Counb Lehudorf could nob be considered to have made a bargain. The Hermib—Devotion mares— Devote, Heloise, Sb. Marguerite, and Thebaia—a famous family—sold at 320, 700, 2,000, and 910 guineas, respectively, whilst Sb; Agatha by Isonomy —Lady Masham made 1,150 and Seclusion by Hermib 1,400 guineaa. The highest figure, however, was achieved by Shall We Remember, a doubtfulClairvauxor Isonomy, oub of Sonsie Queen, who had ab her aide a nice colb* foal by Triabran. Prince Louis Eaterhazy and Counb Lehudorf had a furioua fighb for bhe twain, bub bhe former etayed longest and gob the mare and her foal for 3,100. Wedding Ring by Hampbon reached four figures in the bidding before the hammer fell. The yearlings made a brave show, only two failing to bring bhree figures whilsb three out of the seventeen auctioned reached four. These were St. Ange by St. Serf—Antibes, for which Sir J. B. Maple gave 1,050 guineas ; Canterbury Pilgrim, a nice filly by Triatran out of Pilgrimage, for which Lord Stanley bid 1,800 guineaa; and Roquebrune, a very handsome filly by St. Simon out of Sb. Marguerite, of which, after a hard fighb with Sir J. B. Maple, Sir Jamea Miller became the proud poseea3or at 4,100 guineas. The three stallions of the sbud, Jannissary, by Isonomy, Tristran, by Hermib, and Macheath, by Macaroni, fetched _1,000, 2,300 and 450 guineas respectively. Tristran was bought by Mr Lucenzbacher, and goes to Hungary, which is a pity, since hia stock are ahewing very well on the turf. Hiß buyer certainly gob him dirb cheap ab the price. The total of the Sefton sale reached £45,000. , Saturday saw the final break up of the Royal Stud at Hampton Court, when the whole of Her Majesty's blood stock — yearlings, mares, foals and stallions — was brought to the hammer. The result was a good one financially for the ruler of the Empire, £23,000 being the total for the seventy-six lota aubmitted. Mr Edmund Tatteraall disposed of the yearlings firab. Twenbv-seven of these were sold for 5,640 guineaa, and only one reached four figures, Baron Hirscli buying tho filly by Bend Or —Lucienneß for 1,050 guineas. He also gave 570 guineas for a magnificent colb by Royal Hampbon oub of Blushing Bride. One ot bhe bargains of this lob was Mr W. Allison's purchase on behalf of Mr Wilson, of the Sb. Alban's Stud, Victoria, to wit, the filly by Amphion oub of Mara, which he got for £315. Mara is a half-Bißter to Sandiway, and her filly has in its veins a bounbiful.strain of the Clemence blood, which Carbine and Carnage have made famous in Australasia. Her Majesty's brood mares and foala sold badly until Sanda was put up, Sir James Miller gave 2,000gs for the daughter of Wenlock and Sandal and her colb foal by Bend Or. Anobher Wenlock mare, Recovery, with a colb foal by Bend Or, fetched l,ooogs, and a third Wenlock out of Cybele, with coal foal by Sb. Simon, was run up by bhe Polish Baron bo 4,600g5. Mara, the mother of Mr Wileon'a purchase, waa claimed by Mr John Porter, that aetute buyer seeming very well content to pay 620ga for the daughter of Doncaster and Cleme-ce and her filly foal by Donovan She was certainly the cheapest purchase of the sale. The three stud stallions Town Moor, Hambledon and colt by Mask—Lady Booke, realised 95,620 and 30 guineas respectively.

THE DOWNFALL OE LADAS DISCUSSED.

lb is a curious facb, bub with the defeat of Ladas the effervescence of the Nonconformist conscience regarding Lord Roaeberry s racing proclivities would seem to have subsided. Since Thursday week the Rev. Hugh Price Hughes and Co. have dropped the subject, and, unless his lordship's colt wins the Leger, I don'b suppose ib will be revived. The Premier was much disappointed at his champion's fall. "A very fine race " he said quietly " and—well-1 think I shall go home." Ib presently transpired Ladas had two teeth taken oub the previous day. One or two of bhe ring knew this and fielded " a bib extra' againsb the favourite in consequence. That good iudge, John Porter, after looking Isinglass over, said the old horse would win. "This year's three-year-olds are far from highclass," he remarked, "I know that by my own " The race for the Princess of Wales Stakes will lons be remembered by one or two plungers. The gentleman, for example, who laid 100 to 2on Ladas when Watts sent him to the front in the dip, must have felt decidedly queer a few seconds later. And yeb it looked all the odds. Loates was riding Isinglass hard, and Bullingdon three lengths or more away seemed, like Raeburn and Ravensbury, do«o with. The favourite to

all appearances had the race in hand. He faltered, however, directly he was pressed, and Bullingdon descending on the leaders like a flash'of lightning, paßged him wibho»b an effort). From this point Loatea rode all ho knew. It looked odds on the 50 to 1 chance, but Isinglass running true and game as a pebble won by a short head. In the first flush of his defeat 7 to 4 waa laid against Ladaa for the Leger, but he h^s now recovered to evenß.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18940818.2.22.11

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 197, 18 August 1894

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1,804

ENGLISH NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 197, 18 August 1894

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