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ENGLISH RACING.

THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS.

A WIN FOR LORD ROSEBERY

(BY CABLE—PRESS ASSOCIATION.)

London, May 9,

At the Newnjarkeb First Spring Meeting to-day, the r>ioe for the Two Thousand Guineas resulted as follows :—

The Two T.'hodsand Guineas Stakes, a subscription of lOOsovs each, half forfeit, for three-year-olds ; colt«, 9st; fillies, Bst> 9lb ; tbo owner of the second horse to receive 300hov8 out of the stakes, and the third 'to save his stake—Rowley mile ; 78 subscribers. Lord Rosebery's b c Ladas, by Hampton—illuminate... ... ... ... 1 Lord Alington's b c Match Box, by Sb.

Siraon —Match Girl ... Sir J. Blundeli Maple's b c Athlone,

by Sarabande—Princess Arena

'jpocial interest was centred in this year'e contest for tbo Two Thousand Guineas, owing to Lord Ronebory (Mr Gladstone's i/uccossor as I'rimo Minister of England) owning Ladas, the favourite for the event. There would bo delight among race-goers throughout tho univorao at the success of the colt, owing to the great popularity of his owner and his high political and social position in tho world. Jti England Lord Rosebery has of late been the man of the hour, and every paper one takes up contains an outline of his career, both as a politician and racing man. The " Two Thousand " invariably gives a line to the more coveted Epsom Derby to be run on tho 6th of June next, and in connection with the great classic ovenb yet to be decidod ib is well hero to repeat) an old story, which cropa up again with singular significance. When Lord Roaeberry was at Eton he one day made a bet of a sovereign with another boy that he would marry the richest heiress of the day, become Prime Minister of England, and win the Derby. The win of Ladas yestoiday promises woll 1 for the prospocts of the colt in the Derby and Lord Rosobery pulling off his bat. 'Ladae is described in colour a bay, without white savo tor a birth-mark under the saddle. He stands within a shade of sixteen hands, and is a colt of exceptional length and quality. With tho beat of shoulders and plenty of heart room, scarcely a fault can be found with bis conformation oxcepD that he has somewhat rounded joints. Ladas possesses an unbeaten certificate bo far. His first appearance in public as a two-year-old was in the Woodcote Stakes at the Epßom Way Meeting, which he won, defeating a field of five others. The month following Ladas was pulled out for tho Coventry Stakes at Ascob. This he also won, from a field of nine. The colt was not again goon in public until the month of September, when he sported the " primrose and rose jacket" of the popular Scottish oarl at Doncaster in the Champagne Stakes. Somproniue wa's the only other etartor and Ladas had an eae}' win. A few weeks later tho colt was again soon out at Newmarket, and this was in the Middle Park Plate. Six others opposed him, with the result that Ladas once more proved victorious, going into his winter quarters without suffering defeat. Ladas is trained by Matthew Dawson, and his winnings in stakes last season totted up to £5,7C8. All through the winter months ho has been a short-pricod favourite for both the Two Thousand Guineas and Derby. Ho is engaged in all of tho principal races of tho rouson, and his chances of securing the " triple crown " —Two Thousand, Derby and St. Legor—for Lord Rosebery at present boor a roseate huo.

, Matchbox, who ran second, won tobree out of hi* four two-year-old engagement*, viz., the Kempton Park Brooders' Produco Stakes, Criterion Stakes and Dew-hurst Plate, at JJcwmarkeb October.

Lord Roisobery was born in 1847, and was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. Ho never ahone conspicuously either as a Wet Bob or aa a Dry Bob, and while at Oxiord his chief interest in the way of sport was in racing, He Rttended a'good many meetings, and directly he came into the title and left the Univorsity~two incidents in his life which occurred almost 'simultaneously— he registered hid colours aud bought some horses, which he sent to the late James Dover at Haley to be trained. One was Ladas, after whom the present) favourite for the Derby is named. He was a smart) two-year-old, and his young owner thought he was going to win the Derby ab the first time of asking, but he did not.

The first) iurportanb race Lord Rosebery won watt the City and Suburban of 1874, with Aldrich who started ab 40 to 1. The result was voted a fluke, as rounding Tabtenham Corner Petition fail, bringing down the favourite Bull's Eye, and several others as well. In connection with this race, an oft-told and. well authenticated dream story v is related. Riding down by train to Epsom Spring Meeting, Lord Romdleshani remarked to Sir Frederick Johnetone that he had dreamt a horse called The? Curate won the City and Suburban, " buft," ho went on, "I eeo bhere's no eiich ammal in the race." "Oh ! yes there is," wiw the unexpected reply, "Lord Rosebery's1 Aldrich was originally called The Curate." Lord Rendleaham sought) oub Lord Rosebeiy and a3ke'J if tliis were so. "Certainly," His Lordship answered, "but I wouldn'b bad; him if I wera you. We tried him nob to have a 50 to 1 chance." Nevertheless, Lord Rendleßham risked £300 and landed closo on £25,000. Jußb ten years later Lord Rosebery again won the City and Suburban with a horse that had been badly beaten in its home trial. This was Roysterer, who after coming to 20 to 1, fell back after his trial to 50 to 1. Charloa Archer and Lord Elleamero's party

hoped to pull off a big coup with Lowland Chief on this occasion. Fifty yards from bhe post the latter had won, bu6> Koysberer, who had been shut in, cams through on bhe inßide jusb in bimo, and won by a head. One of the best horses L«d Rosebery ever owned was Controversy, who won him the Lincolnshire Handicap and Liverpool Summer Cup, atid was matched against tho champios nailer of J74 to '70, the brilliant Lowlander.

Ib is jusb bwenty-one years ago since Lord Rosebery was the chief mover in tho House of Lords in the fermation of a committee to inquire into the besb means of. improving the breed of horse 3in thia country and» thua increasing the supply, the direcb result of which was the starting of the various societies which have dona co much to effect these objects. Hia charming old place at Epsom, called The Durdans, is well known to moeb racing men. He purchased it from the executors of the late Sir Gilbert Heabhcote. Ona can walk bhrough bhe grounds almosb from the end of the town right into bhe paddock, and anyone asking for permission bo do so on any race day will rarely be refused a pass. His obher seats are Dalmeny Park, Linlithgowsbire and Rosebery, near Edinburgh, in addition to IVlenbmoro.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18940510.2.47

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH RACING., Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 111, 10 May 1894

Word Count
1,172

ENGLISH RACING. Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 111, 10 May 1894

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