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OBITUARY.

DEATH OF MR ALEX. BRODIE,

An Interesting Career.

An old and highly-respected resident of Auckland died yesterday afternoon in the person of Mr Alex. Brodie, formerly of the Thames and latterly of this city. Mr Brodie, who was for many years a prominent figure at the Thames goldlielda and in this city, was 53 years of age at the time of his death. He died at half-past two o'clock yosterday afternoon at his residence, Brooklands, Grafton Road, after a long illness extending over two years. Mr Brodie had a large circle of old friends, and the news of his death waß received in town to-day with expressions of very deep regret. In February, 1892, Mr Brodie was seized with an attack of erysipelas, mid after a very painful illness showed signs of recovery, but other complications supervened, and though deceased was able to visit town occasionally during the last 18 months, he was uot able to transact any business, never having regained bis usual strength. Diabetes set in, and he became unconscious about a fortnight ago, and since then sank gradually. Mr Brodie's career was an eventful and at times exciting one, and during his residence in the colony he piayed an important part in its settlement and progress, bub more especially that of the Auckland provincial district. The deceased was born at Leith, near Edinburgh, and received his military training at Chatham, where he joined the Royal Engineers. After studying fortification, military telegraphy, etc., he was sent out to Canada as one of a party of engineers, and helped to save the vessel io which he made the voyage from foundering. For this service he received the thanks of the Duke of Cambridge. Subsequently at bbc time when Sir George Grey was Governor, bhe deceased was selected by Major General Schaw, theu in charge of the Military Educational Establishment at Chatham, to open up electrical telegraph communication with bhe Waikato frontier near Pokeno, being associated in this work with the late Mr VVm. Butcher, of Ngaruawahin, who died six months ago. Mr Brodie (S.hen a sergeant) arrived in Auckland from London in the ship Devonshire, on February'7th, 1863—the day that H.M.s. Orpheus was lost on the Manukau bar. Amongst his shipmates were several Imperial officers and men, besides Messrs Wm. Anderson (now City Engineer); Chas, and N.. Alexander, aharebrokeia ; Barnes, of Onehunga ; E. B. Parsons, Secretary of the Auckland Gaa Compauy ; D. Bockett, of Waikato (afterwards captain in the Waikato Militia); W. A. Cowan, formerly of Waikato; and others. Few of the Devonshire's passengers, however, have survived their thirty-one years of colonial experience. Mr Brodio, on landing, started on his telegraph work, the Waikato War being then in progress, and he and Corporal Butcher constructed the first telegraph line from Auckland to Pokeno, and up to the Waikato, along the military road which became known as the Great South Road. From 1863 to 1867 he was Inspector of the Military Electric Telegraph Department in New Zoaland, and in the course of hi? duties instructed the first stall of telegraph operators, many of his then pupils now holding responsible positions in connection with the Telegraph Departments of this and other colonies. During these years he wae attached to General Cameron's staff, his immedialo officer being Lieut, (now Col.) Burton, who now resides amongst us. When the colegraph eervice was handed over to the colonial Government, Mr Brodie's services were fully recognised by General Cameron and other Imperial officers, as wei! A3 by the then Defence Minister, Mr Thomas Russoll, and the !ato Sir Froderiek. Wliituker, who was a member of the Ministry at thab time, by whom he was specially thanked, at the samo time receiving well merited promotion from the War Department in England. The deceased waa al*o the recipient of the New Zealand war medal.

When the colonial policy of independence waa adopted, atid the Imperial troops were withdrawn, Mr Brodie severed hie connection with the army, and subsequently proceeded to the Thames, where he had the superintendence of several large batteries, including r-hoso of tho Ballnrab and Ciun6B and Shamrock claims. During his superintendence 'ho vaado many improvement!) in the cru*hin£ plants, resulting in a material saving oi tho precious metal. In Thames local politics and in.all matters of social interest Mr Brodie took v prominent part. On the formation of the VV'aiotahi Highway Board, deceased was elected first Chairman, and, under his direction and through his etiorta towards securing the necessary supplies from Govornmeut, a splendid cart road up the creek was soon an accomplished fact. The interests of this particular highway district were diligently looked aftor. On the formation of the Thames County Council in 1877, deceased was elected its first Chairman, and held that position for a Deriod of eleven consecutive yeais. The zeal and assiduity which he had previously shown were imported into the new Council's o-flaire, and hi» persistent efforts fur the Thames coon made him known in the oolony, and more particularly afc Wellington, under the soubriquet of the "Sturdy Beggarman" of the Thames. All tho public works and consequent exponditnro of money in the district can be attributed to his efforts, and the large measure ol prosperity which attended the Thamos up till his taking up hid residence in Auckland can be traced to his untiring efforts. In November, 1887, he was elected as Mayor of the Thames Borough, at the same time holding the office of County Chuirman, a unique combination. Deceased was also a J.P., and a member of and generally Chairman of nearly every local Board, including the Thames Harbour Board, Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, Board of High School Governors, Library Committee and every local body which had anything to do with furthering the interests of the goldfield. For savoral years he was First Lieutenant of the Engineer Corps at the ThaineH, his ji>nior lieutenant then being Mr, now the Hon., W. McCuUougb, M.L.C. As ft member of the Thames Drainage Board Mr Brodie was veiy su6cessful, his intimate knowledge of the goldfield3 and its requirements well qualifying him for the position of Chairra<in, which he hold for several years. In 1839 deceased took up his residence in Auckland, and entered into business as a sharebroker and mining agent, which he carried on until tbp commencement of his illness.

Mr brodie was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. Prior to proceedto the Thames in 1869 he was a member of the then Military Lodt,'e of the district;, the United Service, 1.C., and while connected with this Lodge attained the rank of P.M., at the same time being a member of the Irish P.G. Lodge. At the Thames he was mainly instrumental in forming the Sir Walter Secbt Lodge under the Scotch Constitution, and this Lodge soon attained great prominence, not only on account of its numerical strength, but also owing to its excellent working, the deceased being followed by a long list of excellent Musters, who dfd not allow the prestige of the Lodge to wear away. Since coming to Auckland deceased was connected with the Provincial Grand Lodge under the Scotch Constitution, and at the time of his death held the office of Substitute Provincial Grand Master.

In social Hfo Mr Brodie was a wellknown figure ac the Thames, and he was a prominent member and one of the promoters of the Caledonian gatherings which were held at Parawai and Tararu, and the most successful athletic gatherings in the

North Island. As already mentioned, he was an ardent worker for the goldfielda, contributing many and varied articles to the Thames and Auckland papers on the goldfields and their developments and other subjects ; but it was in private life that his good qualities were brought out. He was a warm friend and book a great interest in furthering the advancement of the young men of the district, many of them now holding responsible positions in both Auckland and Wellington papers owing their first rise to his efforts. Unselfishness was one of his marked features, oftentimes neglecting his own interests bofurbherthose of his district and his friends. Up to his death his cheerful and hopeful disposition shone out and his kind word will bo missed by his numerous friends. Mr Brodie leaves a widow and nine children—three sons and six daughters—four of whom are grown up. Mra Brodie is a daughter of the. late Mr Alex. Davidson, engineer, of h uckland. Mr George Fraser, engineer, of this city, is a brother-in-law of the deceased.

Mr Brodie was, during bis residence in Auckland, a member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Ab the evening service in St. Andrew's yesterday, the Rev. J. Blaikic, who was in the pulpit, made reference to Mr Brodie's demise, and at the close of the service the organist, Mr Culpan, ployed the " Dead March " in " Saul."

Tho funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at the Purewa Cemetery, bbc cortege leaving the deceased's residence in Grafton Road at 2 o'clock.

The members of the Auckland Sharebrokers' Association have decided to close their offices to-morrow at 1 p.m., out of respecb for the memory of the deceased, who was a member of that body.

DEATH OF COLONEL DE QUINCE Y.

The manyfriendaof Lieutenant-Colonel De Quincoy will learn with great regret that he died shortly before 8 o'clock yesterday morning. The deceased was an old colonist, having arrived here in 1861. Lieu-tenant-Colonel Paul Frederick de Quincey wan the son and the last surviving male descendant of the celebrated English essayist, Thomas de Quincay. He was born ab Grasmere, Westmoreland, November 26th, 1828, and received his education at Edinburgh. Having elected to adopt a military career, he became an ensign in the 70tb Regiment in 1845, and saw seiviee in India from 1846 to 1860, when the regiment was ordered to this colony. Col. de Quincey had by that time been promoted Major of Brigade on the permanent staff of the Bengal Presidency. He had only juat joined hit) regiment in India, ac a mere boy, when he received hie baptism of fire at the battle of Sobraon, he being the youngest officer on the field that day, and he was presented by his brother officers with a small battle axe in commemoration of the fact. Afterwards having acquired a thorough knowledge of tho Hindustanee and Persian language*, he acted as interpreter to the British forces in more than one campaign, and was employed in this capacity in the first British expedition to Cashmere. He was also all through the Indian Mutiny troubles, and received the medal for his servicesduring that terrible revolt. Upon arrivinginthis colony, Uolonel de Qnincey had command of the firstTransportCorpsforsomo time, after which he rejoined his old regiment. Subsequently he sold his commission and turned his attention to farming, but thiH venture did nob prove a success. When the war broke oub again, in' 1863, Colonel de Quincey was appointed to the command of the left wine of the 3rd Battalion Artillery, with a captain's commission. Subsequently he was Military Secretary to Major-General Galloway, who was pub in command of the whole of the colonial forces, and shortly afterwards w.ih gazetted Major and then LieutenantColonel. When Mfijor-Oenerai Galloway left the colony, Lloutoriunt - Colonel de Quiucey officiated as military secretary to Colonel Haultain. When the war ended Colonel de Quincey returned to a country life and lived' for some years at Howick', beingll acting coroner for that district, a visitor to the Auckland Asylum, and a Justice of the Peace. He afterwards farmed /for many yearfl in the Waikato, near Hamilton. In 1889 he waa appointed Sergeant at Arms to the House of Representatives. Colonul de Quincey when in India contracted malarial fever, and never got entirely froe from its effects. During last cession ho was laid up at Wellington, but when he returnod to Auckland bis health improved. About a week ago he was, however, again compelled to take to his bod at his lodging*, Cambridge House, Vincent-street. Dr. Mackeilar attended* By Saturday evening deceased had become moribund, and Dr. Roberi.dii was called in for a consultation, bub it was found than nothing could be done, and the pal.iont died shortly before eight o'clock yesterday morning. The funeral took place this afternoon, the old officer being laid to rest in the Purewa cemetery. Colonel do Qutncey had made many friends daring his lengthy sojourn in this colony, as he was uniformly courteous to all with whom he came in contact.

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Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 90, 16 April 1894

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2,078

OBITUARY. Auckland Star, Volume XXV, Issue 90, 16 April 1894

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