Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE RACING WORLD.

BY HIPPONA.

MEETINGS TO COME.

icember 9-Onohungaand Otahuhu Suburban > Kcemb!r C 26! bJ a nuary 1. 2-Auckland Racing Member 28-Drury Racing Club December 30-South Auckland Racing Club Tanuary 2-Canterbury Jockey Club January 6-Otahuhn TrottingrOhib March 17-Papakura Racing: Club March 26. 27-Auckland Racing Club March 26.27 -Canterbury Jockey Club November 29. 30-Feilding Jockey Club neccn ber 2U-Hawke's Bay Jockey Club December 26, 27-Northern Wairoa Racing December 26, 27-Thames Jockey Club T),icember26-MataniataßacinßClub Somber 23. 27. yO-Auckland Trotting Club's Summer Meeting •Unoarv 26, 29-Talcapnna Jockey Club March 17— Papakura Racing Clud Saroh 26.27-Auckland Racine Club May 19. 24-Takapuna Jockoy Ciub

Owners of trotters and ponies should not overlook the fact that nominations for the Auckland Trotting Club Cup of 400aov8, Pony Cup of 15030v5, and the other rich stake.? to be decided at the first and second day's A.T.C. Summer gathering, close with Mr 0. F. Mark on Friday next. The programme is the bi£ge9t and most liberal put forth by a Trotting Club in thin colony, and the powers that bo should be rewarded wibh a long nomination list. Nominations for the Onehunga and Otahuhu Suburban Racing Club Meeting are also duo on Friday night next. Mr Morrin has issued the usual catalogue in connection with the sale of his yearlings. A number of visitors daily visit Wellington Park inspecting the dillerent lots which come up tor sale. The Otago Cup is run next Wednesday, 29th inßt. Last night the following acceptances were received for the event: — Otago Cup of 400aovs. One ruile and a-haif. st lb st lb Clanranald .. 311 Dilemma.. .. 712 Prime Warden .. 811 Response .. .. 710 Liberator.. ..8 7 Melinite .. .. 7 5 Skirmisher ..8 3 Johnny Faa ..7 2 Kangipuhi ..8 1 Major George announces his annual yearline sale for Saturday, December 30th. Nelson has fully proved himself as a sire, and the lot should readily find buyers. I will review the batch in due course. From Dunedin comes news of the death of the brood mare Malice, dam of Mischief, tho Wellington Cup winner of 1883. She was the property of the Hon. G. McLean, and died of natural decay at the ripe age of 26 years. Major George's mare Vendetta has produced a colt foal by Nelson. Fraternite, who is engaged in the Auckland Cup, has been thrown out of training, and is doing stud duties at Wangauui. The well-known pony Signess, bred in Auckland, died latoly in Sydney. Liberator, the winner of the last New Zealand Grand National Hurdle Race, has passed into the hands of Mr 1\ Butler. Mr Morrin has 27 foal 3at Wellington Park, 14 of the number being fillio3 and 13 colts. Frailty and Veneration are the only mares now to foal. Refering to the running of Skirmisher, the Auckland Cup and Derby candidate, at the C.J.C. Meeting, "Castor" writes:— Skirmisher, undoubtedly, stood head and shoulders above the other three-year-olds, with the exception of Ich Dien. The son of Vanguard is up to the average of Darby winners, but he is probably not above it, and I fancy he is a good deal below tho standard of such horses as Maxim, Manbon and Sir Modrod. Ho is possessed of any amount of pace, and could of course be hardly held slow enough to easily defeat bis very moderate opponents in the Derby, In the Canterbury Cup, however, it was another matter, and it struck me that it was only his brilliant dash of pace that enabled'him to draw away from Prime Warden in the last fifty yards. He was certainly very distressed when he pulled op, and while admitting that the pace was made fairly fast from the fall of the flag, I quite agree with one of our best known trainers" when he stated that he thought if Prime Warden had set a sounder pace he might have won. Nevertheless, Ido nob wish it thought for a moment that I would detract from the merits of Skirmisher. Mr Keid's colt is both brilliant and honest., and is in every sense a credit to his sire. The mail brings particulars of the defeat nf Isinglass by Raoburn in the Lancashire Plate. Thero were only four starters, the weights being:—Raeburn, 9st lib; Isinglass, 9»t 1 lib ; La Fleche, lOst 131b; and Lady Caroline, 9sb 71b. Isinglass made nearly all the running. The pace was "muddling," which \va3 against a sluggish horse like Isinglass. When full steam waa pub on the race was very much a repetition of the startling Two Thousand Guineas of 1889. Then the respective jockeys ot Donovan and Pioneer were so keen on beating each other that the thought of danger arising from anything elsescarcoly crossed their minds. Butwhile they were seeking, a? tho saying is, to cut each other's throats, T. Cannon waited at their heels with Enthusiast, and with a masterly rush on the post just beat Donovan by a head. Much the same thing oc- , corred this y6ar. Loates naturally thought La Fleche the one source of danger, and Barrett was attempting to cub riowrn Isinglass, with the result that when both wero spun out by their exertions Watts turned on Raeburn'a admitted speed and landed him a comfortable winner by a length from Isinglass, while La Fleche was half a length away. The value of tho stake was £6,340, and the time for the mile limn 4S|Bec. The late Newmarket (England) sales of thoroughbreds ended in a dismal failure, Dot ono in 10 of tho lots offered finding foyers. Mr D. Cooper was determined to reduce his string, and sold seven, bub the highest figure' realised was 330gs for ■*'ione, a two-year-old filly by Isonomy /•om Alone. Baron Hirsch sold Paradox's |wo-year-olrl brother Parbleu for 30ga, wofllfb he paid 2,0001.'s for him last year. I'lie Melbourne Cup trophy this year insists ot a punch bowl, with pair of "wkery ,md a champagne jug, allot" solid Silver and richly .-hosed. i»e English pi pers report that Jewebt, : hQ trainer, received a present of £3,000 "'cm Mr M'Calmotib for the admirable way ") which h < trained Isinglass for the Two j'hou&aiHl Guineas, tho Derby, and St. witer. 'fhe hor,-e's owner ia eaid to have "inderf a treble event of 12,000 to 1,000 ,'"'Ms horse. For the Derby ho had •MM) to 100 about him taken when tho un°e»ton horae was a yearling. Mr M'Cal3, wo may add, is a young millionaire. *• «ale.j, the crack Australian horseman, interviewed. I make the fol*">ir extract:—Your Ensign Derby most * kl»ink wasn't won by thehorse ? ''No, * really believe I won tha'b myeelf. Ensign Lf 8a Stood little horse, and I had backed hm 1- l knew that Carbine could beab . Jl« a fair act-to. I thoughb it all oub Ch ' and the very fact thab than lv Was moro certain of beating me k?K obhers >made me fan°y fchat) if l «w 9ro9t BOab him firbt«and could keep Whil URh for a daah afc tho last moment), uJhi. makin S believe I was beaten, I ' nffi wfa ibi Ib had t0 be done in a few VQa8 f tor two strides paab the post

Carbine was ahead again. Carbine was one of the few giants of the turf I never rode, and, undoubtedly, a galloping machine ; but for pure grace in galloping I think The Admiral is as prebty a mover as I have ever seen. The whip loses, many races, for ib is fatal to draw it to a beaten horse any distance from home; but most hors63 will answer the first two strokes, when giving no response bo the spur, and a couple of cuts at the right instant may geb a beaten horse in front, when to flog him would only make defeat more certain. On one occasion I won a race on Ambition by reserving the whip for the last three strides. Epicurean had him beaten at the distance, and his rider waa looking round at me. ' Keep at ie, my boy, and I'll beat you,' I thought, and when within a few strides of the post I lifted Ambition in front with a sudden effort, to which the other had no bime to reply.' The crack jockey halts a long bime over an opinion as to which was absolutely the best horee he had ever won with. And if we only take one of his winners for every year of. his twenty years' active ridinj?, between '72 and '92, whab a Hat to pick from '.—Richmond, Lurline, Briseis, Pride of the Hill 3, Firat King, Savanaka, Grand Flaneur, Progress, Navigator, Martini - Henry, Nordenfeldb, Trident, Abercorn, Carlyon, Cranbrook, Malua, Dreadnought, Titan, The Admiral and Forfcunatus. "Ib is very difficult," he save, "to make a comparison between horses of different seasons. The three.l like best were Grand Flaneur, Trident, and Abercorn. Grand Flaneur was an ideal racehorse, and would go as fast as you wished and stay as long as you wanted him. Trident was a sluggard, but Abercorn a horse of splendid disposition. I think the more of his performances because he met a rare lob of racehorses in his career —Maxim, Moorhouse, and Mabador as youngsters, and later on Carbine, The Australian Peer, Lochiel, Melos, and Manton. The hardest race I ever rode was on Aborcorn, when only a head separated him from Carbine and Melos, whom he had to beab in turn, and he was still at his best when an accident on the training-brack broke him down."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18931122.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE RACING WORLD., Auckland Star, Volume XXIV, Issue 277, 22 November 1893

Word Count
1,572

THE RACING WORLD. Auckland Star, Volume XXIV, Issue 277, 22 November 1893

Working