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THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER.

Our London correspondent sends the following interesting particulars in connection witlithigyoar'oSt. Legor: The St. Legor like tho Derby has of late years ceased to.be a heavy betting race,.but in the North of England its popularity remains undiminished. One reason I fancy why your Yorkßliiroraan loves the Leger ia because ho Boven times out of twelve backs the winner. Unlike the TwoV Thousand and the Derby in which, "tarnj-upsi" are comparatively frequent, the great struggle oiuhoTown Moor usually fallstoafavourite, Wehavo to go right buck to 1861 foi Ja surprise atl>oucaster similar to tho cue)which Sir Hugo favoured us with at Epsomj last May. That was, of course, When\| William V Anson's contemned filly Caller Ou beac tho Derby winner Kettledrum. | Dutch

Oven's remarkable resuscitation in 1882 was, I need hardly remind your sporting readers, the biggest surprise ot recent years in the Sellinjjer. Had the filly belonged to anyone bet the late Lord Falmouth, nasty things would have been said* This year's contest at one time looked like providing a mosb interesting race,, but the elimination in turn of St. Damien, Bonnvista, and St. Angelo aftor, considerably reduced its open appearance. Since Orme'9 rather slovenly victories »D Sundown and Goodwood he became a hottest favourite, till at the end of last week a slight shade of odds was laid on his beating the field. The weather, fine on Tuesday, became wet on Wednesday, but this did not prevent tens of thousands of sturdy Northerners turning up on the Town Moor. To everyone's disappointment neither Orme, La Fleche, nor Watercress turned up in the paddock, but Sir Hugo held a levee there and shared with the handßOmo punure the honour of being mobbed.

In the Ring the anticipated eleventh hour demonstration in favour of Watercress did not come off. On the contrary, La Fleche was all the rage, and from 5 to 1 and 9 to 2 oamo to 4to 1 and finally 7to 2. Owing to this Sir Hugo retreated to 10 to 1 and May Duke to 100 to 7, whilst cries of " 20 to 1 Watercress" and "50 to 1 bar six" could be heard all over the Ring. Oime was said to be "very firm," and certainly there appeared to ba any amount of money forthcoming to back him. Nevertheless, the Ring did hot tiro of laying, nor did the favourite's price harden. Mr Fry expressed himself willing to take 6 to 5 till the cows came home, explaining that he'd won so much over Orme's de» feotion ot Epaotn that he felt id his duty to give the colt's supporters a chance of getting their money back. The eleven runners were punctually at the post, and after a couple ot breaks away, Mr Coventry dropped his flag to a beautiful start. For the first hundred yards there was the usual rush for places, and then the lot settled down, with Sir Hugo at the head. It soon became evident that the pace was not strong, and no doubt tbis was why Geo. Barrett presently Bent Orme to the front. Once Orme, howover, led the Van the field came along a cracker, and as the favouiitos raced toward!* the Red Houee with free stride, bis followers grew so sanguine that even thus far from home some of them began to proclaim his victory. At the Red Houee Orme led by quite two lengths, but almost immediately after, May Duke and La Fleche followed by Watercress commenced to decrease the gallop. So dense waa the crowd thab even from the top of the stand little could be seen of what was happening aa they thundered past the five furlong starting post, but when at length we suw the advancing column come liying around Intake bend the aspect of the race had undergone a complete change. Orme wub now hard pressed by La Fleoho, May Duke and Watercress, and Barrett seemed the revorse of comfortable. In another moment Barretit took up his whip, and wild Bhouts of "the favourites beat" rent the. air. From the moment Orme 'compounded It became obvious that La Fleche would win easily. Opposite the stand May Duke tell back beaten, and Sir Hugo, coming <iyith a wet eLect, tried to catch the leader; bat it was not the least use, and amidst little or no excitement. Baron Hirsch's filly won in a common canter by two lengths, his second string, Watercress, finishing third, three lengths behind Sir Hugo. May Duke was placed fourth, then came Orme fifth, and—twenty lengths away—The Lover, at the head of a long tail. Time, 3mln 14scc. Stakes, £5,400. Orme, had he kept well, would have won the Guineas, but a mile is evidently the full length of his totbar, and had he started at Epsom,!.We-.should certai^ly^ay.B.-seep a; repetition of the Surefoot catastrophe. Watts had previously enjoyed successful rides over .tho, Town. Moor qa Ossian, The Lambkin, and Memoir, and on Wednesday scored his fourth St. Leger.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18921022.2.15.10

Bibliographic details

THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER., Auckland Star, Volume XXIII, Issue 253, 22 October 1892

Word Count
830

THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER. Auckland Star, Volume XXIII, Issue 253, 22 October 1892

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