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ENGLISH RACING NOTES.

(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)

London, August,

Gloomy Goodwood,

Goodwood is moro dependent on fin 6 weather for success than any other of our big meetings. Shelters there are practically none, and when the rain comes down in torrents like ib did on Wednesday and Friday, or drives across the hills in gusty showers like ib did on Tuesday and Thursday, the misery of bho entire concourse, from Royalty downwards, is simply unspeakable. Close cabs holding four persons, took as much as a pound a head for the drive from the courso to Singleton or Chichester on. Thursday, and picnic hampers being mostly soaked, famine prices reigned at the bars. Mr Brodrick Cloete, who as a rule bets but in small sums, had a big dash on Unicorn for tho Stewards' Cup. He pub his brainer, Marsh, on £5,000 to nothing, and, 'tis said, the ring were touched altogether to the tune of £50,000. Fortunately for them, however, other horses were very heavily backed too. Captain Machell struck out Killowen when he found ib impossible to geb a beb of £14,000 to £2,000, and henceforward I calculate the forestalled will leave his stable alone. These gentlemen, likewise, backed Euphony so liberally thab the owner, Mr G. C. Paget,couldn'tget on, and it muse have been with mixed feelings he saw the filly beaten. The Duke of Westminster's Orme (by Ormonde oub of Angelica) justified the high reputation he broughb from Kingsclere by carrying off tho Richmond and Prince of Wales' Stakes (worbh together £4,000) from good fields in tbe easiest possible fashion. This colt will certainly win next year's Derby if he keeps well. Several speculators were willing to back him for the Blue Riband at 6 to 1, bub the best offer proved to be fives. Baron Hirsch's sister to Memoir, La Fleche, continued her victorious career in a couplo of races, and as Gonsalvo won the Goodwood Cup, Kingsclere must have had a good woek. Mr Gretton's horse was, of course, first favourite for the last-named event, though Memoir looked extremely well, and Barmecide was fancied. Mr Cooper's filly Melody also ran, but she seemed quite outclassed, and has probably been over-rated. The Manton scarlet came to the fore on Friday, when Goodlake ran away with the Chichester Stakes and Shrine (by Isonomy—Pilgrimage) scored an easy victory in the Chesterfield Cup. Cutblesbone was favourite for the last-named on the sbrength of his Steward's Cup running, and again gob second. Lord Bradford is very unlucky.

Orvieta's brilliant victory in the Sussex Stakes baa shaken Common's position in the Leger betting, and 7 to 4 is now freely offered againsb Lord Alington's crack.

What long strides in physical progress would be made if one was reared with reference to giving his body the beßt care possible! As ib is, many a man spends more vital force in digesting hia 6 o'clock dinner than he does in attention to his business, and many a woman spends moro n erve, vigour, and strength in contending against the bad condition imposed by unhygienic fashions than she spends in any useful walk in life. If she would only contend againsb them with reference to freeing herself from their bondageib would be to some purpose. Nature is inexorable, and any violation of her laws, whether done in wilfulness or ' ignorance, will surely meeb with punishment. The laws which govern digestion are just as stern as those of If a person does not suffer immediately from abusing his stomach, there will be a cutting off the digestive faculties later

in life. The stomach, liver, heart, lungs and kidneys are the organs most likely to give out, for they are the ones most subject to abuse, particularly the first two. Then headaches make their presence felt; a pain v experienced in the chest, back, or side, with a continual bearing down in the lower parb of the loins ; constipation ensues, and defecation cannot bo obtained without tho useof violent purgatives; tho water becomes discoloured, and burns when passing, and is frequently oily, muddy, or thick. Indigestion also sets "in, and the food instead of being properly digested and assimilated in merely passed through the alimentary canal at the patient'? sola risk. Nature's laws must be Obeyed, or the greatest danger isinevitable. Whereany unusual sensations, paina or aches are experienced it i? proof positivo thab something is wrong ; and as the tendency after manhood is always towards decay, prompt measures must bo adopted to resuscitate the diseased organs, and wo can honestly recommend patients to uso Cloments' Tonic. This is a genuine arbicle. 'Wo wish thore wero moro patent medicines on the market of similar value ; ib would bo well for tho world at largo. Clements' Tonic is honestly whab ib professes to bo, a scientific antidote to the causes of diseases, ot debility, impaired vitality or weakness of any kind. You can call disease by what name you liko if it springs from dobilitation of any kind Clements' Tonic is tho proper and only rcliablo remedy. Neuralgia is ono of tho firsb and most reliable symptoms of approaching physical decay, and Mr A. J. Scnbt, " Daily Telegraph " office, Launcosbon, Tasmania, gives his endorsement thus : — "Sir, —In justice to you, and intho interests of similar sull'erers, I write bhisin the hopo bhab many in trouble may be induced to try Clements' Tonic, also that tlie sale of such a genuine article may be increased. My wife was a dreadful sufferer from neuralgia for over twelve months ; she had all kinds of remedies wibhoub the slightest benefit, bub aftor seeing Clements' Tonic advertised in bho local papers somo time, I procured a bottlo, and sho found considerable benefit in two day?, in fact, folb bettor after the first fow doses ; she continued Clements' Tonic until ono and ahalf bottles wero taken, and now, I am thankful to say, sho is perfectly well and has had no return of tho pain, and wo have great hopes thab the cure will provo permanent. You may uso this unsolicited testimonial as you may think best, and I will only be too happy to give fuller particulars ab the above address." Otto Fischer, Esq., President, Association Graphic Arts, Sydnoy, writes under date January 23rd, 1891 :—"Saberstreet, Woollahra, N.S. W. Dear air,- • Walking up and down my verandah in tho agonies of neuralgia, a sympathising neighbour told me how her mother was cured, after year.? of suffering and no end of expense in medical treatment, by Clements' Tonic. • Though no believer in patent medicines, tho increasing pain gob tbe better of my prejudice, and I think it only my duty for the relief the first bottle gave me. Clements' Tonic has done me good, and I shall take good care never to be without ib, and heartily recommend ib to suffering humaniby." Such lebters_ as these musb satisfy the mosb unbelieving. The only point is that,sufferers musb bo careful to gob bhe genuine Clemout3' Tonic. No otuer. will do. Laboratories, Sydney, N.S.W. *

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

ENGLISH RACING NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XXII, Issue 229, 26 September 1891

Word Count
1,169

ENGLISH RACING NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XXII, Issue 229, 26 September 1891

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