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AMATEUR ATHLETIC SPORTS.

(By Act.cox.)

TRAINING NOTES.

There are no sports meetings of any kind in which the public generally take more in. teresb than in those provided by the Auckland Amateur Athletic and Cycle Club. The racosare always good, the bicycle events are particularly interesting, the weather has generally been all that could be desired, the Domain looks at its gayest and befefc, and the ladies say the afternoon tea ia delightful. Then the si9ters and the cousins and the aunts, and other female and male relations of the fellows who run, not to apeak of other fellows' sisters and female relations, all look forward to the day, and talk about ib eagerly. It is safe to predict, then, that next Saturday will see a large crowd afc the sports.

The entries for the present sports are larger than at any previous Spring Carnival, and the contests are likely to be good. There has been, of course, the usual grumbling among the men, who thought they ought to get big starts or somebody else ought to have small ones. But nearly everyone who entered has cried content to start in his races, so the fields will be large. Nearly all the men are well trained, come having been in work for over two month?. It's now no use for a man to try to run unless he is in good form. The handicappers consider that every man is trained. Hence the limit starts have been a good deal reduced, so that tho scratch men seem to have a lighter task than in the old times. During the week past the various runners have been trying their speed againat all sorfcs of articles produced by tho watchmaker. Many marvellous times have been done, if one can believe Dame Rumour ; but it will take more than the family watch to convince sceptics. These trials are all very well, but the real test is tho race itself. A man may run very well alone, and may make a very diirereat exhibition when pitted against a number of others. The introduction of the " set " system of starting, aa practised in Australia, is sure to have some effect on the sprints. Under that system, rigidly worked, none of the competitors can sneak yards. B. Owen has been training under Charley White's care, but does nob appear to have overworked himself. Bβ ran an excellent quarter tho other evening, but is not in perfect form. His general style ia as good as ever. Laird, about the prettiest runner in Auckland, has improved in Taylor's hands this time. Hβ was never better in his life —well trained, and striding like a horse. His running is worth looking at. Hutchison is also running well, but he is nob so easy to train as some others. Charley White has taken good care of him. He does not appear to be much better than before, but I fancy ho is stronger and will run a Sine quarter. Collins ia also trained by White. He is well trained, bufchae hardly had as much as he needs. He has been expected to make a burst for a long time, bub has not yet done himself justice. Hesketh showed up well last meeting. Hβ has been training Remuera way, bub look& as if he had done too much work. Mowbray, who won Carrollo's race last season, has been well watched by the bandicappers. He is under McHugh's care, but looks a bit worn. He is a nice likely runner. Smith has not had enough training for sprints, but in the longer distances his strength will be found all right. I believe Jonea is the appropriate name of the trainer.

Madigan, the well-known lootballer, has had Lecky's assiatance in training. Ib has been found necessary to ease him off in his work. With syds in 120 he looks well on paper. Pickering has taken him up, and he is strongly fancied for the double. W. H. Martin has improved greatly under Goodman's guidance; but he may not go for the sprints. Christie ia now trained by Johnson, who has got him fairly tit. He is likely to try the longer distances. Vealo is a new man in the Auckland Club. Ho ran at the Thames some yeara back. His style is not very taking, and with 6yds in 120 he should be safe. Kilfoyle is well trained by O'Brien, and is running much as usual. He should show some improvement, however, as he is just the kind of man on whom two or three seasons' training has a good effect. Upfill haa been training ab Remuera, and will be in very good form this time. He ie not jumping so well as he did at the meeting when he did his big jump. The quarter-mile hurdles will probably attract his attention. At the same binie he has a nice start in the 120 yds, and is going so well that one ha 3 to be careful about him. T. Roberts, of the Athletic F.C., is very fast on the football tield. He haa wou races before, and ie now going very nicely. Brigham ie being trained by White, and though hie chances for this meeting are not of the rosiest, he givee promise of turning into a good man. F. Atkinson is training under Ted O'Hare's directions in Ponsonby. He is striding along very nicely, and should he elect to go for the distances he will make it very merry for the best. Weston appears to have improved, thpugh he denies the soft impeachment. Healy has charge of him, and hie chances are fancied by many. Be has been brought back pretty well by the handicapT. Davis is one of the men to whom Pickering has devoted hia attention this meeting. He is running very well, and has been fairly treated. J. Hill haa been training ab the North Shore. Great things were expected of him when he ran last, but performances did not come up to time. This meeting may show better things. T. E. Short is said to be oub of condition, though I have nob seen him. He is worth inquiring about. Some say he is in good form. W. Cruick3hank, with Byds, Iβ not out of it. He is in fairly good form, and should run a big race. Bull has grown greatly since laat meeting, and is in every way greatly improved. He is not likely to try sprinting, but in the half - mile should make a very close finish. Hales is the Auckland footballer, and chows plenty of pace on the field. He is a very likely-looking man. How his training has progressed I don't know. Hβ looks in good enough health and form. _ Hβ must have done some good trial, judging by the actions of hia friends. Langsford's chances are greatly fancied. He certainly ran well at the Grammar School sports, and has been well-treated by the haudicappers. He appears to be in good form, bub has, I hear, cut his foot badly. Johnson is "brained by Taylor, and should be held very safe by Laird. In the hurdlea he may make a big go. Impey has been under McDermott, and Iβ greatly improved. He ie nicely placed, and will go very close. . The quarter mile will probably be his special fancy. Gledhill is not trained. Barton runs well, but he doee nob appear to cover enough ground. Still he has a' good start. W. Wood is under Johnson's care, and is thought to be the dark horse of the stable. If bo he will be a pretty hard nut bo crack. Boyd is trained at the Shore by Bailey! He has an idea that he can win and is worth watching. ' Burgese has been training at the Shore. There seems to be room for improvement in Dim. * Bull6t, under White, ehould get on a fine

stride, but he appears a bit slow. Hβ has yet bo learn a good deal aboub running. Lewis is one of O'Brien's men. He runs nicely and some say he is & dead bird for the 120 yds, while others claim that the half will suit him best. I have nob heard his trial. Waite is a young runner, and is not likely to do much this time. He had better wait. Oh !, Barnes, with 11 yards, has a fair show this time. He is said to be training at Arch Hill. He seems to run well, and will be dangerous. B. Myers ran well at the Grammar School sports, and is a strong runner who may upset tilings generally. He has done a fine trial, and is greatly fancied. He seem 3, however, a bit in and out. Lundon has not had a long enough preparation, and should not be troublesome. Chatfield has been trained by Donaldson, and is fancied by his crowd. Ivil's chances are nob great. McMillan has sprained his ankle, but he continues training in Ponsonby under O'Hare, and with pretty long starts may turn out wall if he starts. Lynch has been reduced in weight considerably and appears to be in better form than ever before in his life. Goodman has charge of him. He has big starts and is well worth watching, especially in tho long distances. T. Whiteside ia in good form, and has had Bob's watchful eye on him. Ho has always been a good runner without much finish in him, and a bad finisher does nob geb right in a day. I have not seen Rhodes training, but if he is in form he will make everybody run. He showed his hand last season. His chances must nob be despised. D. Harvey is in excellent form, and is another of the "dead birds" for the 120 yards and bracelet. He certainly runs well, and has been well treated; bub there are so many dead 'uns thafc one gets suspicious. McCorquodale considers that he is " eat on," and has not trained much. Goldwater has not been so thoroughly trained as ho needed, owing to a stiff neck early in hie work. His health is fairly good, and he may again surprise the knowing ones. Dixon has trained him. Dickey, under Goodman's care, is running well and wants that bracelet. Taylor has been trained by his namesake, and looks to be in excellent fettle. The half is consider a sweet morsel for him. E. Noonan is not an impressive runner. G. B. Croker has had McDermott's advice. He has a big start in the hurdles, and is said to be good for the half. Keep your lamps trimmed. Batger is another who is.nob afraid of the hurdles. Ho can jump, but may nob last the distance. Simpson has been trained by Bailey. His show was fancied, bub be is said to have cut up under a hurdle trial. Nixon, who walked last tizie, will probably go all out for the hurdles. O'Brien has got him nicely fit. J. W. Winks, trained as usual by Johnson, is the same J. W. W. He is very cunning in trials, but those who think him " out of the hunt" are probably mistaken. He is in good form, and his quarter at the Auckland College and Grammar School sports was very well run. Clarke, under McHugh, is better than ever. He is in fine form, but his stride is not improved much. His wind is good enough for anything. Laurie belongs to a long-distance running crowd, and is fairly treated. Hβ is eaid to have done a good trial.

J. Winks is in good form under O'Brien. If he is anything like his big brother 70yds ought to be a nice start in the mile. He runs well. McFarlane, under White, does not show much improvement. L. Croker, under'O'Brien, is walking well, and will be very tit by Saturday. A. G. Harvey has been under Me Dermotb, but his training has been so much interfered with that his condition is nob of the best. A Davies, under McDermotb, has been doing steeplechase training. T. Gordon, the Gordon footballer, under Goodman, doea nob show much style. Gilbert has the makings of a runner, but he does not appear dangerous bhis time. L. Myers has had a good deal of training. Sbill he'doee not look light enough. Peace has been trained for the walk by Healy. He is in fine form and walks better than ever. His trial was good. Creamer, under Goodman, is also imoroved, and steps ouc splendidly. Beale has had only a walk or two. . Evans is a Gisborne man, where he won two raced. He seems bo have trained too much. Edmonds, under Healy, shows a lob of imorovemenb. Peace ought to have him safe. Fenton's show is not groat. Selby is walking well, and is well trained. If be does not break he should be close at the tape. Seccombe has been trained by the Hendrys. He gives promise, bub has not got a big show from the handicappers, and his form is nob yeb the best in the world. Jackson is the Mangere man who was considered a good thing at last walk. I have not been oub at Mangere. Burton ie a brother of our champion and promises well. He will, however, find ib too hard this time. Collings is new at the game, but improves under Goodman. By-and-by. O'Dowd, another of Goodman's men, makes a bib too much use of his body. If he cau last the distance at his initial pace or anything like ib he will be dangerous. Burna is a fair, nice walker, bub he is hardly lively enough. Reynolds is supposed to be a hummer for the Maiden Bike. He rides well and is in good form. Johnson has trained him. Waters has been laid up. Gilbert is going for the mile foot-race also. He has hopes. Hazard rides very well, and is in fair form. McCallum has not done much training. He has good etarta and may geb close. Buchanan is in excellent form, and is riding in his good old style. The handioapper has, however, set him big work. He may give them all a shock. McDermobt has trained him. Howard has been trained by Pickering. He is well treated and is riding well. His chances are considered very good by his crowd. Hoffmann is Johnson's deadest bird. He is riding splendidly and is stronger than ever. Leeky has been training , , and will make no bad Bhow. Selby is better trained than usual. He is going well and has got a new racer. Stewart is at it again, and looks to go in better style. McGninness has trained him. Short is another man greably fancied. He is in good nick. Whisker trained him. Hammond has trained with Buchanan, and is in fair form. Hβ is a strong rider who will want some beating. Aickin is in good form, and is a stickler. Hβ looks light, but rides well. To-morrow afternoon I shall try to give a few bips in regard to the races.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18901120.2.4

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume XXI, Issue 274, 20 November 1890

Word Count
2,517

AMATEUR ATHLETIC SPORTS. Auckland Star, Volume XXI, Issue 274, 20 November 1890

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