Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TURF GOSSAR.

t t {M ffIKRJSJfc] ■ Lo'c.vi. trainers are now busy with their charges, getting them ready for sprinK engagement', and tho fine weather this week has been taken full advantage ofRuddy has the tracks at Ellerslio in splen. did order, and his constant attention comes

in for no end of praise at the hands of the ;rniners. Kean is & frequent visitor from

KohirnavauVa; with Leopold and CuihWster, and Escutcheon Ins also boen brought over on several occasions. Tho trio are usually indulged in threo-quarter paco work. George Wright has a lengthy string in hand. Hotchkiss and T'exsum aro worked in company, the pair being eont good serviceable work ovary other morning. Hilda and Balista (Artillery's full sisters) are 'doing sloiv wort: Mr W. Bobbett's threo-year-old colt Patchwork, by Piscator—Patch, promises to be a good colt. Ho is al°o doing slow work. George Hope is busy with Puschka, giving him a steady preparation ; but Jamaica, his stable companion, is a "frost:" The veteran Chaafe has Barigl'd, Tarttir, iinH

Ilataplarl in. slow work; Tho trio are sound arid healthy-looking. Major George's pair 'df three year-olds, Clive and Raglan; arc regular attendants on the track, and both aro doing strong work under T. Hodson's montor.-liip. Nelson has not yet made his appearance on the coirsc, so it is tolerably certain that ..he will not figure among tho riext K./i. Cup field. Autclopo Was put in work again this week. Cissy (Tronton's full sister) is the most forward of the two-year-olds, but another very promising ono in tho same stablo is a filly by Musket, out of Crinoline (dam of Clogs). Harry Harrison has a filly by Ingomar—Fanny Fisher pretty forward, and J. L&ing has Sovereign, the colt by Guinea—Hippona, in hand. Quadrant,

the colt by Robinson Crusoe—Radiance, is growing very fast, and there was some talk of spelling him. Altogether, there are quito as many horses in work at Ellerslie as in any previous season. I hear that Clogs and tho chaser, Falcon, who are located at Mangore, are both wintering well, and my informant states that Clogs never looked better.

Tho annual meeting of members of tho Auckland Racing Club takos placo on Monday afternoon at threo o'clock. At the conclusion a special meeting is to bo held to confirm the rules drawn up by the Metropolitan Racing Clubs to limit the undue use of tho totalisator. Up to tho present timo these ruloa have been adopted by the various clubs excopt the Dunodin Jockoy Club, who object to rule six, which provides that any two clubs holding two niootings in tho year must givo an average of nt least £200 per diem in stake?. Tho D.J.C. think that £150 instead of £200 would suffice, for tho rulo if brought into force as it at prosent stands would soriously affect sovcral up-country OtagO racing institutions.

Mr W. Bobbett was up from tho Thames this week. Ho brought Libeller and Maoriland w/ith him, both of whom .ire for private sale. Mr Bobbott has taken a lease for twelve months of the stables nt Ellerslie lately occupied by A. Sutherland, where hia horses will now be located under Howe's Cftre. Lady Norah is still turned out ut Meadow Bank, and I hear hor injured leg is quite sound again. There is some talk of tho Auckland Racing Club doing away with Mr Evitt's services as handicappar during the coining season, and appointing a committee to perform the duties. If the powers that bo take this step, I think thoy will mako n mistake, for horse-owners in the South and at Napier will bo sure to opposo it, for reasons which I need not state here. Let the Club by all means appoint another handicapper if Mr Evitt's efforts have not given satisfaction, but for goodness sake don't let us have a committee to mako tho handicaps. So sure as tho Club decide to revert back to this system, it is certain they

,vill bring a hornet's nest about their heads ?rom outside owners.

From Christchurch I learn of the death of the throe-year-old colt Bar Sinister, ono of Mr G. G. Stead's New Zealand Cup candidates. Bar Sinister was a son of Albany or Cadogan out of No Name, and his only appearance in public was at the lastGJ.C. Autumn Meeting, when he ran unplaced in the Rußsley Stakes. The colt was in work at Yaldhurst and was doing well till a few days before his death. Major George has named his two-year-old'filly'by Ingomar — Florence, Ficxola, while his yearlings have reen honoured as under:—Chestnut filly by King ColoTenambra, Afiss Cole ; chestnut filly by King Cole—Florence, Goal Scuttle ; bay filly by St. Albans—The Maid, Vendetta ; and chestnut colt by First King—Memphis, litprhal.

There has been a totalisator dispute pending for some time between the Auckland Racing Club and Mr W. Adams over a sum of £110, said to have been paid short over tho last Summer Meeting. Tho matter was roferred to arbitration, Mr Henderson acting on behalf of the Club," and Mr E. \V. Alison for Mr Adams. These gentlemen drow up lengthy loports, which,were submitted to Mr 11. \V. Moody, the umpire, and he decided .against tho Club.

Acceptances for tho New Zealand Cup close to-night. The first forfeit for the Melbourno Cup falls due on Monday afternoon.

The Winter Meeting of the Victoria Racing Club takes place at Flemington this afternoon. ■ Tho leading events are tho Steeplechase and Hurdle Eaco of ],000sovs. each.

In ChrisfccWch, Lochiol and Artillery are still quoted favourites for tho N.Z. Cup at 7 to 1 each, while 10 to 1 can be had about Carbine Springston, Sb. Clair and Exchange. One of our local books tn» week laid 100 to 9 about Escutcheon for me raco, and 30 to 3 about Carbine. , Ossory (Ormonde's full brother) eocurecl the rich. Eclipse Stakes, for the Duke, of Westminster, and tHo English_noblemnn also provided the runner-up in Orbit, tmis having compensation for his non-«»ci»^ this year's Derby. I notice that »kt»e Ascob Meeting O?sory won the Irini. ° Wales Stakes, the principal event on xi first day of the meeting, and later on ran a dead heat with Galoro, the onVv otlici starter, for the St. James Palace Stakes. At the annual meeting of the 'nombe B \?eet the Taranaki Jockey ClSb the balnnce- pheet submitted showed thnt £1,034 H* h. n(*Jf o C" paid away in stakes durinfi#^S k692 6a had been expended .on a .^ r t , stand; and £256 14s 9d on fencing, "'«l cU)b totalisntorlmd brought in X26J. * 2&5 A baa a debit balance at the bank «£*""%,„ M. The balance-sheet \va» ad°£'" " olitau club a K reed tojoin the other »»«£"£„. ro^ Clubs in adoptmpc the now rules; Jo ide d gulation of the totalisator. It was ao<- ~

to recommend the incoming committee to hold theolub's two days' meeting at the end of January, and as a means of keeping up tile aiiiiiVetajJLry yf (-.lie province, to MVe one day's racing i\h the end of March or tJin beginning of AprSt, Wrifcea " Senex "' : — Relative to the scratching of Carbine for tho Melbourne Cup, I called at the office of the Secretary of the C.J.C., and was informed that as that official had power to rnooivn. .etitWes and Pho £ov£ll§ foFtho V.X.C, lie coh ; teiidsii most righteously I think; thdt lib lids a perfect right to accept scratching? from ,a,!jy Qy/iier \vlio may li'^preii to be ,i". Key: JftAlniltf at WiH tilVo \% desirfeiS to Strike kit hoi-sis out At any rate Mr Tenfold has registered the scratching of Retina and Scots Grey for tho Maribyrnong Plata Chri tahiirqKpaperaijloscpiUo.thO prntid .Nnljlonul o^'i'tsisb ks biS slowest nnd least OAciting tlmb lms occurred since tho race was instituted. At the very first ionco thero was a regular scrimmage amongst tho body of the iield, and Chemist was a eufl'eror to such an extent that he never showed pi'ointncnlly In tho moo again, Moeere ttobbs mid Goodwin passed £4,434 through theft totalisa.tb.rS; and tho Meeting WiU bijObnbly shaw o. slight br'Bfifc; AtlvlidS from LJunedin state tho N. 2. Cup candidates, Silvormark, Somneil, Snapshot., and Wolverine arc all doing good steady work. Tho most improved lioraj in training is Snapshot. When the last mail left London a report was curront thnt Ayrshire, tho Derby winner, had brokon down. On tho previous day ho wna the medium of strong opposition for tlio St. Leger, and stondily ducllued until 33 to 1 wna frcoly offered. I notice by English1. JlliSs Unit ftiur filios aUd.ohbc«lt By the &,?). Stud Company's Mofiinct feiv'e BWord l)ance were among the ilampton Court yeailings, sold at an average oE 474 guineas last month. Mr E. S. B. 8011, the lessee of Christchurch Plumpton Turk, has foUUtl it Mcjesstiry to eeok thu protection of tlio Bankruptcy Cdurt: Tlio receipts Over tlio V&ceiit stbeplcdiaso metittllg ai;o hbld by Sir BjSU'a batlKers; w.lib, HeclHio tb lloHouf bt'cqlies ili paynienb of the stakes! Under these circumstances winners will naturally look to tho stewards, and those gentlemen will find themselves in tho very unf.-r----tunato position of having to satisfy tho demand?. Mr J. B. \Vallis, an orst member of tho Victorian ring, died rccontly in Brisbane jn M<e ..ro>-erso df h!!!ucht 'circumstances, uecensed at ono time owned the New Zealand main Calumny. According to Mr Thomas Learmonth, who has just returned to Victoria from India, the statement that tho Indian Government/ would bo prepared to pay ,£53 for Australian horses ia not correct. Tho 650 rupees guaranteed are equal to only about .£43 10s. " Vigilant," in tho Molbourno " Sportsman," relates tho following funny story :— " A pony who hasn't scored rt win for somb considerable time, arid who, together With his party, is very generally credited with being of a peculiarly pationt and longsuffering nature, has been ontored consistently for various races nnd just as regularly scratched for tho last fow months. He didn't get much weight off, but other horses who ran into places wore risen, and at last the waiter's day arrived. ' It was a real good thing, and hid party wore prepare! to pjatlk,fjhoir money down in hundreds'. But tlidy overlooked ono little fact. Tho pony had waited so long that he had grown, and they wouldn't pa^s him ! Moral.—Patience is not always profitable." Up to June 2nd tho Duke of Portland had already secured £16,113 15s in stakes during tho present season; Of this sum Ayrshire brought in £7,625 by winillng tlio Two Thousand Guinea.i and the Derby. A rather singular stceplebhasing incident ij reported by tlip Paris co-respondent; of tho ''Sportsman." Kilworth was ono of three runners for tho Prix de la Venorio, at Aut.euil, but ijesorted to his old tactics of rofllsing, aiid as.ho declined to negotiate tho brook opposite tho stand ho was taken back to tlio paddock. A littl.o further on the olhor competitors, Musilrd and Amelio, also refused, upon which Mr lienzon's hoi bo was brought out again, and after being drivon over tho river, completed the course [ilono. After passing tho post nn objection was lodged against him, and upon the matter being taken into consideration by tho steward?, they disqualified Kilworth under tho fortioth rule of tho French SteepleehaHo Code, and declared tho ruco null and void. Says an English writer :—" In a conversation with Judge Clark, prior to the Derby, 1 learnt how ho had been amusing himself working up coincidences, and as tho veteran judfjedoo3iiot oftenso indulfro withoutnrriving at something in tores ting herolappcud tho result of his ruminations, which appear to have turned upon the figure 8: — h\ 1848, Surplico won tho Derby. Eight letters in his name. In 1058, Beadsman won the Derby. Eight letters in his nnmo. In 1868, Blue Gown won tho Derby. Eight letters in his name In If 78. Softon won tho Derby. Eight letters in his owner's name (Mr Crawfurd). In 1888, Ayrshire won tho Derby. Eight letters in his name. Owner of Ayrshire, l'ortland (Duke). Eijjht letters in his namo. Dam ot Ayrshire, Atalanta. Eight lctiers in her name. Jockey of Ayrshire, F. Barrott. Eight letters in his name. And to crown all comes tho rcmarkablo coincidence that in '40 John Kent (eight letters) trained Surplico, had not seen a Derby sinco, but was present to witness tho success of Ayrshire. At a banquet in Sydney given by the master of the Hunt Club, Lord Cnrririgton, who was in the chair, stated that lie never know what " big timber " was until he camo to Australia, wtioro tho fences are fully n foot higher than woro to bo met with in tho old country. Tho most difficult country that over ho met with in England was on ono occasion when having a run with the Cotsmorc hounds, nnd tho fox crossed tho railway lino twico, but only four horsemon successfully negotiated the fences for tho pccond time, and ono of tho four was a Mr Russoll, nn Australian, who was mounted on nn Australian horse, which ho had brought to England with him. " Robin Hood," writing to tho " Australasian," Baid that a well-known English backer won a wagor of £6,000 to £1 about the treble event —Veracity for tho Lincolnshire. Handicap, Fullcrbon for tho Ci'y nnd Suburban, and Ayrehiro for the Derby. The Gippsland "Times" reports a big leap peiformcd by a horso recently at Me3?rs Mathieaon and David's saloynrdg, Salo. Tho horso jumped the ting fence, sft sin in height; and afterward jumpod over a drafting yard fence exactly 6ft lOJin high. The horse stands barely 15 hands, and is thoroughbred, by Topsawycr out of a Bonnio Dundee mare, and is unbroken. "Nemo" has been analysing tho Molbourno Cup weights, and concludes lengthy articles by opining that the best in of the lot undoubtedly is Aristocrat. Of the other candidates ho fancies most Crnnbr'ook, Niagara, Cardigan, Silver Prince, Tranter, Spade Guinea, Pasha, Matador, Carbine, Dick Swivellcr, Lonsdale, Tho Yeoman, Frisco, Vonturo', Meteor, Chicago, Magazine, Ensign, and Lnmond. Writes " Rapier" in the English " Spo ting and Dramatic News " : It seems that the year nftor next, if all goes well, we are to have an Australian colt, or'possibly an Australian colt and till)', running in tho Derby. Mr J. Whito, M.L.C., Sydney, is the grcit owner in Ausrnlia, and I beiiovo Lord Carrington has betted him £10,000 to £100 that ho doo3 not win the English Derby in the next two years. Mr White owns at present a yearling filly, own sister to Acmo, a daughter of the famous Australian sire, Chester—and also an own brother to Cranbiook, who has done great things in tho colonies, and if theso two or either of them answer expectations they will be sei^t over to England in due-course. Can wo say that wo wish fchoin luck, and hope one of them will win ? It isa difficult position. We always like our guests to be.pleased nnd to have a eood time ; but I am not sure that wo quite want them to win the Derby. ■ I think tho best wish I can conscientiously frame is that the bettor of Mr White's pair iVW k° just Rood enough 1o run our Enf-

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18880803.2.43.3.2

Bibliographic details

TURF GOSSAR., Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 181, 3 August 1888, Supplement

Word Count
2,518

TURF GOSSAR. Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 181, 3 August 1888, Supplement

Working