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From Bailiff to the House of Lords.

The Wellington correspondent of the •Melbourne Age' contains the following account of thenewEarlof Seafiold - career,n this colony :— . From the humble calling of ba.l.ff to a peer of England is a transition that one night expect to hear of in a work of lie tion, U an Stance has happened m Ne« Zealand whion chows now f. v ,- t0 S,r S^S years LS na med Giant took up ins a^o -t thehtUe ahion "doing odd jobs of clenoal wo k and often glad to pick up an honests idhng by carrying a SS Bbrff = ordinalv mortal v/omu v- "' h Tvelihood i" this humble . manner and he look no pains to impress his patrons with the belief Uiat he had been born with a .Ivor spoon in his mouth. By-and-by lie blossomed into a bailiff at the local court s and a position which is pretty generally^regarded with contempt, in *°™&?s™s. at all events, jarred upon Mr Grants leei , "a became bailiff that he might ?"e. and saw nothing objortmnaWo in his new occupation In 18M■ 01 - cumstances occurred which rendered it impossible that he could any longeiconceal his identity. In that year the mail fiom England brought him intelligence that Ins father had become the ninth Earl of Seafiold, and had taken his seat in the House of Lords as Baron Strathspey. lhe Oamaru bailiff was his eldest son, and as such bocame Viscount Reidhaven. Ho stuck to Oamaru, however, and became a remittance man. With a handle tohis name ho turned his attention to politics, and twice contested that seat in Parh/imentthe first timo with Mr Shnnwki, now a Legislative Councillor, and subsequently with Mr Hislop, our present Colonial Secrotarv. On both occasions Lord Reidhaven was defeated. News came out tlie other day that his father had died, after enjoying the title and estates for a little more than three years, and now our Oamaru acquaintance steps into his shoes as tenth Larl of Soalield. It is needless to say _that Oamaru will know him no more, as ho is oil' to play a higher role in the United Kingdom. Tlie family estate is one of the largest in Great Britain, comprising 305,9301 acres, bringing in an estimated rental of £7-,--/. The forestss, which extendover4l,37l acres, were valued in 1856 at £1,211,130 for the timber alone. The barony of Strathspey is expected to yield £50,000 a year in 30 years time from its 19,315 acres. A case has recently occurred in tho Wairarapa district where a labourer, without expectation, has succeeded to a baronetcy and large estates in Endand.'

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From Bailiff to the House of Lords. Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 165, 14 July 1888, Supplement

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