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The Record Again Beaten.

MINTING'S EXTRAORDINARY

PERFORMANCE

SCENE AT KEMPTON.

(fkom our special cobrespondent,)

London, May 14.

It has been ray luck to witness many great races and extraordinaryperformancesduiing the last five years—first one animal and. then another having astonished us by beating the record —bv,t never have I seen, nor (I suppose) shall I again see anything at all like Minting's victory at Keropton Park la&t Saturday. It was not that the great horse won carrying the unprecedented weight of lOst. Bendigo's performance under 9sfc 71b had prepared us for -that possibility. But it was the way the victory was gained. In the first "place there was a delay of half of an hour, and seven false starts at the post. No joke .bhia for n horso carrying lOst. Ho convinced did many of the oldest and most experienced bookmakers become of the impossibility of Minting's task under the circumstances that they overlaid the. favourite many times. At last, when the field did get off, little Chandley, who was onCobbler, and had given the starter most of the trouble, managed after all to steal about three lengths. Those he quickly increased to ten. In fact, so big did the gap presently become that most of us on the stand thought Mr Houghton'a. colt would never be caught. Half-a-mile from home Cobbler was still careering on ahead ; however, the favourite emerged from the ruck and essayed to catch him. This was the supremely anxious moment of the race. Fortunately it was only a moment, for Minting's immense stride soon began to tell the tale. Sailing along as though lOst. vyere a feather, Mr Vynes' great horse quickly closed up the gap, and, heading Cobbler opposite the stands, won in a common canter by three lengths, which Webb could easily have made four or five.

To realise the full significance of this performance, one requires to remember that the 19 runners for the Second Great Jubilee Stakes represented the flower of our handicap horses. Never, I should think, were fche.re more genuine triers in a big race than on the present Occasion. Florentine, Tyrone, Thunderstorm, Ashplant, Diavolo,C4allinule, and Cobbler had each large parties behind them who considered, defeat impossible. Captain Machell told his allies he had tried Florentine higher than he had ever tried any horse of his before. "Diavolo," whispered Robert Peck to a privileged few, "represents Harpenden at 6st lOlbs," whilst itshplant's supporters averred boldly that their long bottled-up one could do anything with Che*tei iCvtp winner, Kinsky. In Mie paddock Thunderstorm was pronounced over-trained, and Diavalo sweated profusely. The latter, I may here mention, finished absolutely last. Maxim ran well, and so did Tyrone, whom tho judge' er roneously placed second instead of third. With Minting out of the way, Cobbler would have landed a very nice coup, and Maxim have got a place. The public and the plungers are the biggest winners by Minting's victory. To tbe former Bendigo is always Pendigo and Minting Minting without regard to the weights'carried. The plungers too like hot favourites and generally stand by them. Mr Benzon won £35,000 by Minting's success, and Lord Dudley £15,000. The race however was a capital betting, one, and bookmakers who betted to figures and refrained from" foking liberties with the favourite miist hare £0t nearly round. Mr Yvhes waS- in grand form at Kcmpton as in acfdltion to. 'ihs iTubilee Stakes of 3,000 SG.V3., he won the Grand Prize with CrowThe cheering whicli greeted Minting'a victory was of the heartiest description, and must have done much to console Mat Dawson for the T.wo Thousand Guineas disappointment of'lßS6. It will be remembered that prior to that race the popular trainer declared Minting the grandest animal he had ever had through his hands. Then came Ormonde's easy viotory over the "crack," and Mat was much upset. Later the eon* of Lord Lyon ■ won the Grand Prix de Paris without an effort, and seemed likely to vindicate _ his reputation by carrying off the Eclipse Stakes. On the morning "of the race his leg filled, and Bendigo was left to score a semibloodless victory overSt Galien and Candlemay. Last Ascot, Minting (himself again) came out a grand looking four year old and defeated St. Mirin~and the great Bendigo over tho severe new mile. This was evidently such < a mere exercise canter to him that Ormonde's backers for once trembled, and even Porter for a moment. hesitated whether to risk defeat on the Hardwicke Stakes. How the two equine giants metagain at level weights and how after an Homeric gtruggle_ the 2,000 guineas form was triumphantly vindicated you all know. It remained only for. Minting to win on Saturday to show what an incomparable animal Ormonde was. By the way, it is now clear Bendigo's Ascot form was about ri^ht. Minting, .according to such race, roust have been 141hd in front of Bendigo, and Ormonde we know was from 51bs to 71bs in front of Minting.

His Lordship Bishop Luck, speaking 01 thS publication of the "Early History of the "Catholic Church in New Zealand," say YVe are now celebrating the first iubilee period of the Catholic Church in New Zealand; tho publication, therefore, of this ' Early History' is exceedingly appropriate, and will form an acceptable souvenir to celebtate the first planting of the faith in this colony. The history is written by the Apostolic Bishop Pompallier himself, of which he is the author and hero." In accepting a complimentary copy, the Bishop BBvsi "I thank you very sincerely for the beautifully-bound copy of your edition of the ' Early History of the Catholic Church in Oceania.' I was nob aware thafc such hib-h-class binding could be done in Auckland " A copy of the history should be found in every Roman Catholic home. It is now published, and maybe had from : tho oanvassers or at the Stab Office.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18880627.2.18

Bibliographic details

The Record Again Beaten., Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 151, 27 June 1888

Word Count
978

The Record Again Beaten. Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 151, 27 June 1888

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