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TURF GOSSIP.

[By Hifpona.]

The English racing season is now in fal swing. By cable we are placed in posl session of the result of the Craven Plate^ which fell to the Duke of Westminster's colt Orbit, a son of the Epsom Derby winner Bend Or and Fair Alice, and trained by the world-famed John Porter at Kingslere. Orbit is a stable companion of Friar's Balsam, last season's unbeaten crack two-year-old, and his victory may bring him into the front rank of favour for tho Two Thousand Guineas, which classic evont comes up for decision on Wednesday next. In any case ib would appear fclmfc the Duke of Westminster will make a big bid for tho " Two Thou." with one or other of tho pair, Orbit or Friar s Balsam, not to mention another well-per-formed candidate ho lms engaged in the race in the sliapo of Ossory (a full brother to tho mighty Ormonde). Orbit was well bucked iv tho early part of tho winter to win the Two Thousand Guineas and Derby on the grounds that he had been tried with Friar's Balsam, and had been found to be tho better atayor of tho pair. Latest papora to hand also stato that recently Orbit was backed for tho Derby for all tho money going down to 9 to I, Ihub figure being wanted in thousands, but it was nob forthcoming. Orbit's winnings in stakes last season tottod up to £1,883, and English writers describe him as a well balanced, mannerly colt, with high quality and good notion; but if an exception would be taken to him it is that hi is a little lacking in substance and rather narrow. Orbit's best performances last season wore the I'ritorion Nursery Handicap at New-marl-cot, which lie won in a field of hen, carrying Bst 51b, with Johnny Morgan (7st 31b) second, and tho Uhaplot colb (6sfc !)lb) third; theKempLon I'ark Chtun|.-i n Nursery Handicap of seven furlongs, carrying 7*l 1111), and beating Hanover (7-t 41b), Flower o' tho May (Out 101b), AlborUis, Victor Albert, and seven others and the Dovomlgo Stakes at Derby (onemilc), carrying 9stslb. Local trainers arc making a atari: to break in their yearling.-. E. Kelly lias in hand the Robinson Grusoo — Radiance colt purchased by Mr \V. Bot.bett in January last, and George Wright is teaching Cissy (Trenton's full sister) the rudiments? of her education. Wright has also had his string further strengthened by the addition ot tho rising throe-year-old ''olts Tuxsimi, by Musket — Albativs, and Hotchkisf?, by Musket—L'otroleuse. Both have boon turned out for some months past. I hear that the directors of the New Zealand Stud Company do not intend to take any steps for the present to secure a stal lion to fill Sword Dance's place. I am glad to be able to stato that Bangle, Derringer, Rataplan and Tartar, who were knocked down to MrJ. Chaafcat last Saturday's salo at Ellorslie, were purchased on behalf of one of the gentlemen who comprised tho late syndicate thatChaafe trained for. May tho new owner's pluckincss be rewarded with a win at the first time of asking. It transpired during the afternoon thut Mr Lennard had instructions to bid up to 150 guineas for Turquoise, but as there was little competition for the son of Tubal Cain, ho got him for the small price of 80 guineas. Turquoise was shipped to Napier this week, in wjiich district I understand Mr Ellinghain, his now owner, intends travelling him. It was generally understood by thoso assembled around the ring that Necklace was destined for Australia, but I am pleased to chronicle that she was secured on behalf of a m6st successful Auckland breeder. Auckland loses a good all-round sportsman in Mr D. Twohill, who loaves for Sydney on Tuesday, whore ho intends settling down. He intends taking Cinderella across with him, and the daughter of Jav'lin figures among those nominated for tho Royal Stakes, a six furlong race run at Randwick on Queen's Birthday. The weights for the race are duo on Tuesday next. Ted Kelly goes over in charge of Cinderella, bub ib is understood he will return here again in the course of a couplo of months. A petition is being pub in circulation in Auckland for presentation to Parliament, praying for the repeal of Section 46 of the Gaming and Lotteries Bill, which gives power to the Colonial Secretary to grant permission to work the totalisator at race meetings. Tho nominations for the Great Northern Leger, to be run at tho A.R.C. Autumn Meeting of 1890, tot up to 49. Mr W. Douglas, of Napior, is the largest nominator, there being six entrioe opposite his name, while Mr G. G. Stead and Mr S. H. Gollan figure with three each. Among tho other nominators are Messrs W. Sommerville, Tancred, P. Butler, J. Marshall, C. Beresford, E. Cutts, Westmacott, Allan McDonald, Major George, Hon. G. McLean and Captain Russell. The Champagne entries number 43, Messrs Douglas and Stead being the largest nominators. The programme of the Takapuna Jockey Club Winter Meeting will be found in our advertising columns to day. Tho gather ing is announced for the usual date, 24th May.

The mail steamer Alameda, which passed through to San Francisco this week, had on board the remainder of the thoroughbred colts and mares thab Mr J. K. Newton recently bought in Sydney for disposal in tho American market. The three colts were bred by Mr Andrew Town afc Hobarbville, one being by Fergus the Ist from Alsace, by Consul from Airedale, by the Mountain Doer from Chaperon, by Flatcatcher. No 2is by the New Zealandbred Cheviot (imp.) from Scraps, by Lord of the Hills out of Sylvia's sister Ragpicker,, by Fisherman (imp.), from that grand old matron the imported Juliet; and the other is by Kingsbrough from Fleetwing, by Lord of Linne from Heba, by Magus. The first of the mares is Zara, aged, by Marvellous from Stella, by Kingston ; No. 2 is Mary Anderson, 4yrs., by the Drummer, from Dolly Varden, by Lord of Linne ; and the other is a chestnut by Emperor, from Passion. All thene have been served so as to foal to American time, Z^ra being put to Monmouth and the others to Epigram. The following Auckland owners have named their yearlings as under : — MR W. SOMMERVILLE. Br £ by Musket -Frailty Cissy. Ch c by Loolinus—Lovebird Albert. MR NTCVILLTC ROSS. Ch c by Leolinus— Lady Mary Leofrto. Be by Ingomar-Dundee Katie Moktkose. MR J. MARSHALL. B f by Leolinus—Perfume., Nosegay. MR W. WALTERS. Br o by Hippocampus—Grami Duchess The Baron. From Napier I learn thab there are not many horses in work there at the present time, and this facb is certain bo make the fields small at the forthcoming Steeplechase Meetings. The dry season and hard cour.ee are mainly attributable for this state of things, and most of the horses have been treated to a blistering and a spell so ad to get them fit for next spring,

The "juvenile" races of the Australian Jockey Club which closed a few days back, have each filled well. The Champagne Stakes of 1890 has attracted 88 nominations, of which 10 represent the Kirkham stable, and are the produce of Chester, MartiniHenri, and Gang Forward (imp.). Nine follow the name of the Hon. W. A. Lone, the progeny of Grand Flaneur, Monmouth, Gang Forward, Neckersgat, Richmond, and Gloucester. The Queensland contingent includes a full sister to the Australian Peer, and a couple sired by old Vespasian ; while Musket is responsible for two and Apremont for one of the New Zealand-bred stock nominated by Mr Stead. For the A.J.C. Derby of 1389 52 entries are booked, and the Hon. J. White heads' the list with half a dozen, the progeny of Martini-Henri and Chester. The Oaks of 1889 filled with 47 entrants, including several from Queensland, and the A.J.C. St. Leger 1890 attracted 52. Thirteen sires are nominated for the Sires' Produce Stakes of 1892. as under:—St. Loger, Nordcnfeldt, Epigram (imp.), Grand Flaneur, Sardonyx, Cheviot (imp.), Monmouth, Trenton, First King, Robinson Crusoe, Martini-Henri, Chester, and ono Victorian nomination. In tho First Foal Stakes, for which there are 196 entries, Mr Andrew Town stands at the head of the list with 70 nominations. Mr F. Reynolds follows with 25 entries, including 14 of Goldsbrough's produce, 6 sired by Splendor (imp.), und 5 by Drummer (imp.) Tho New Zealand Stud and Pedigree Stock Company's nominations total 20, of whom ton arc by NorderifeMt, 5 by St. Logcr. 2 each by King Colo and Capbivator, and Ibv Leoliims. MrJ. Marshall has entered Necklet (Necklace's sister) for each of the principal racos,

On« hundred to (ive on the field is now procurable about anything in tho -New Zealand Cup in Dimedin, ami at tliat ligurts I (" Mazeppa ") know of several lines having been booked about what arc deemed the prime goods, such as Silvcrauu-k, Mpringrtton, Chain Shot, Bere.sford, and Sextant. A fow of the cracks, such as Maxim and <!ip.«y King, are 80 far nob asked for, bnokei'H having an idea that they may bo sent over to Australia in I he spring.

Mr ICdward Lou, one of the oldest, and most prominent of Australian sportsmen, and one of tho Crown Prosecutors of New South Wales, is d.-ad. During liia time he owned souk! of the: host pcrf. >rmir.;. among

whom may be inentioiiOilAv.-ilaMchc, Phuibo, Coquette "(A. J.C. St. Leger), Wnppliu (dum of Lecturei, Kingsborough, Nellie, At:.), Barbarian and Barbolli: (brother and sister to The Barb), Tho Fop, Paraguay, Lady Elizabeth, Toothpickcr, Emily, iNelli-; and ho.si.-; of othorK which left their mark" in classic raco records. Mr Leo wna President of the Now South Wales Coursing Club from its inception, having been lirst to introduce the sport oi Hie ioa.sh into .\*uw South Wales, anil ho n it only acoHm.;, i--;jd tho first hares, but al-o won i In: lirstcup ever run for on Buthurst Plains wit!) hi; dog Snowstorm. Jimmy Ke.m, who now presides over the Kohimarnma establishment, was one of Mr Lu^'s iir.sb trailers, and he won for him a. number of races.

Turfites will shortly be puzzling their brains to pick out an animal likely to annex the V.R.C Derby of next season, ho at this juncture the following condensed remarks

ineufc the Australian two-year-olds from the pen of " Tristan " will no doubt be read with interest: —With tlio exception of Lonsdalc and Venture, tin; colts huvo shown very indifferent form indeed, and the chances of the fillies look much brighter than usual ; but I should not bo surprised to .sue the winner ol both races come from the dark division, which includes several promising candidates. Among' thorn may bo mentioned Magazine, Mulos, Per.dragon, Royalist, Lincoln. Anivlius, Chainsliot, etc. Magazino and Melos are two iine colta, and with ordinary luck Mr Gannon, who him also Wyconibo engaged, may have the gratification of winning the Victoria Derby for tho second year in succession. Majjuzinc is a full brother to Ar.*.-nal, but is a much more commanding animal -in appearance. In this res'iect he takes! more at'Ler his other relative, Algerian, who, like Arsenal, is out of a Blinkhoolie mare, and both are by Goldsbrough Melos is a full brother to Tiie Broker, who was a very fast 2-year-old ; and I have no doubt, that he will win a good race for the maroon and white. Besides Venture, who has shown j^ood form, Mr Long has two well-bred colts in Lincoln, own brother to Garfield ; and Aurelius, a half-brother to Dainty, by .Semnuß; and if inako and shape be any criterion, Pondragon, by Julian Avonel— Tiara, will be a great gallooer, and may yet bo as well known on the turf as his namesake is. Royalist is by Crown Prince out of the famous old mare Chrysolite, the dum of Robinson Crusoe. Henchman, Defoe, Vaucluse, etc., which is good enough for anything. Tryon has been added to the list; Knightsb: idge is to be taken to India, tho Waler's asylum ; and if Mr White i.s to be successful it will he with Volley, who is undoubtedly tho filly of the season. The Chaldean is highly thought of in Tasmania. Pearlshell's form is well known ; and for the sake of her owner, who is a good sportsman, I should like to see her successful. Consequence is not engaged in either race ; but Lady Betty, if she trains on, will do credit to Mr Cooper's yellow jacket. Lonsdale was thought a good deal of when he won the Jiaribyrnong Plate. .But his form since then has not been first-class ; and ho will have to improve considerably to have a chance of coping with Volley and Lady Betty, both of whom are on public form lengths in front of Ringmaster^ brother. This is a " far cry " to September and November ; and there would bo little merit in attempting to prophesy the winner now. So I shall merely mention those horses which from breeding or on public form seem most likely to play an important part in the two Dorbys, and they ate Magazine, Mobs, Carbine, Lonsdido, Lady Betty, Volley, Venture, Quadrant, Tho Chaldean, Fine Lady, and Pendragon. It maj be as well to point out, perhaps that Bernardo, Lincoln, Fine Lady, and Ringdove are not engaged in the Victoria Derby ; and while the names of Magazine, Quadrant, Guildford, Alphington, Baronscourt, Sylvester, Forest Queen, Carbine, Paraphrase, The Chaldean, and Venture are missing from tho A. J.C. list, they are all nominated for the blue riband of our Victorian neighbours.

The Victorian studmaster, Mr Samuel Gardiner, has had Dame Fortune frowning; at him again. While being led round Flemington Lord Bundoora reared over and broke his pelvis, and subsequently Maroondah died from rupture of the intestines, and Pride, darn of Quintin Matsep, also went the way of all flesh from natural causes.

One of the three Victorian defaulters over the recent Australian Jockey Club meeting made his appearance in the saddling paddock,at the last Elstern wick Pwk races. His presence was soon made known, however, and a Melbourne metnllician reminded him that he was on the latter's books to the tune of £50 in connection with the Sydney meeting, and asked for at least a portion of the debt. Mr Defaulter at once denied all knowledge of any betting transactions, and was subsequently brought before the stewards. To that body he also repudiated the debt, buthisSydneyescapade was by that time stale news in Melbourne, and two policemen escorted him to the nearest way out of the stand enclosure.

It may nofc be generally known how extensively the ownership of racohorses is distributed amongst bookmakers,writes "Vigilant" in the "Melbourne Sportsman." I have been amusing myself of late by.compiling1 a few turf statistics, hitherto unpublished, and this-, amongst other matters, has entered into my calculations. No fewer than 35 owners, representing, say 100 horses, race openly in their own names ; and in addition to that total there are 15 other fielders interested in horses who prefer to race in their trainers' names. These will, I think, r.:..":p ■■ !;'fcal of

something like 120 horses in training throughout Australia, the property of members of the ring, the majority of whom, according to my calculations, race openly and aboveboard. My readers may calculate for themselves the annual cost of maintaining, training, and racing these horses all over Australia. Putting it down at the modest sum of £150 per horse per annum—a very mild estimate—we get a total of £18,000 ; and when travelling expenses are added I think we could almost double that amount, the bulk of which, by the way, is distributed indirectly amongst the general community. A new enterprise is about being undertaken in Sydney. Mr Thomas Cook, of Turonville, Scone, has determined on sending to England a shipment oi 150 horses to test the market for cavalry and. coaching stock, of which there is understood to be a most inadequate supply. Mr Cook has long been a most successful breeder on a large scale of the animals popularly known as ' useful hon-es,' and it is said is about the only one who seems to have succeeded, through a course of years in truly diagnosing a most difficult problem and collecting together a number of mares to mate profitably with Yorkshire coaching sires.

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Bibliographic details

TURF GOSSIP., Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 100, 28 April 1888, Supplement

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2,716

TURF GOSSIP. Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 100, 28 April 1888, Supplement

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