Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Newton.

A LARon audience gathered at St. George's Hall, Great North Road, at noon to-day, to witness the nomination of candidates for the district of Newton. Mr J. A. Beale (solicitor and barrister) officiated as Returning Officer. He briefly read his authority as laid down by writ. Sergeant Clarke and Constables McDonald, Christie, and Detective Herbert were in attendance. The entrance of the various candidates was the signal for loud applause. There waa some hesitation felt about getting a start, the question of precedence no dovtbt keeping nominators back. Ab length Mr Beale said that if no candidate was nominated there would be no election.

This brought Mr James Jamieson to his feet, and he proposed Mr Henry Thomas Garratt.

Tins was seconded by Mr Holloway. Mr John Anthony Jickell proposed Mr Joseph Augu&tus Tole as a fit and proper person to represent Newton.

Mr Charles La Roche, in seconding Mr Tole's nomination, expressed, pleasure in doing so, because he was a true liberal who had done good service for the country. He referred to the great pressure which had been brought to bear upon Mr Tole -vith regard to the education question—a pressure which he had honourably resisted, and proved true to the constituency which had returned him. He hoped they would again see Mr Tole returned at the top of the poll. (Cheers and uproar). Mr Holloway, who seconded the candidature of Mr Garratt, then spoke in his favour. He had been anticipated by a gentleman' from the body of the hall. The statement that Mr Gurratt had come forward to split the votes on behalf of Mr Withy was not true. Mr Holloway then referred to the political principles of Mr Garratt.

Mr T. B. Hill then came forward and nominated Mr Edward Withy as a fit and proper person to represent Newton. (Frolonged cheers and uproar). He said that ho was a protectionist, although he supported Mr Withy. (Cries of " Sit down" "Time, time," and "Take a show of hands.") He had previously supported Mr Tolo bub when ho heard the extravagant nonsense which he spoke at the first meeting in St. Sepulchre's he lost all faith in him and the Ministry which he represented. He had decided to assist to put better men in the place of the present Ministry. (Cries of "For God's sake, sit down. Let's take a show of hands. Were nearly melted down here.") Mr Tole backed up Sir Julius Vogel. But the time had come for them to consider men instead of measures.

Mr Hill attempted to continue his speech, but was continually interrupted. He continued that he believed that his candidate would be returned by a large majority. (Cheers and uproar. A voice : " You want a little soothing syrup.") Mr Hill, after a few more remarks, resumed his seat.

Mr Edward Bellhousc then seconded MiEdward Withy's nomination. He said that his nominee was an honest independent man. (Applause and uproar). Mr Henry Garratt then came forward amidst applause to address the meetin.?. He expressed surprise that ho had been nominated by Mr Jameisou, who had followed his vindictiveness against him to the very grave of h?s children. A man had circulated reports that he was an Atheist, a bad husband and father, and it was such a man who had come forward at the last moment to propose him without remarks in order to prejudice his candidature. He wished to exonerate both his opponents from any participation in such practices. When one who had sprung from the industrial classes opposed such men as the Hon. MrTole or Mr Withy he should hope for some support from the working men rather than mean opposition. He did not intend to go in for personalities. He admitted that he had come out to split the votes, but only in the hopes of being returned by the electors. From the first he had opposed Mr Withy simply because he was an out-and-out free trader, and he felt sure that such a man could not understand the wants of the industrial classes .as well as one who had sprung from them and knew the true value of a protective policy. He trusted that the best man would be returned and that he would prove true to the pledges he made, whoever it might be. . Mr Tole then came forward. He was received with applause. He expressed pleasure on seeing so many electors present, as it augured a very great interest in the contest. This was his fith contest and he did not fear the result, as he had fought bigger men than hi.-, present opponents" and proved victorious. As he had repeatedly, addressed them he need not recapitulate. During his 12 years' service in thes House he had conscientiously supported liberal and popular measures. The well-being of the great mass of bne people had ever been his policy. He relied aloneupontheintellieenceofthepeople and the equalisation of the electoral rates. One vote and one vote only for each man. He also believed in liberal land loans. These they had already got owing to Mr Ballance's village settlement scheme, tie also believed in remodelling the railway tariff, and asserting the mining industry. He was utterly opposed to any reduction in the education vote which would cripple the system The Government would retrench to the' extent of £5000 per annum. A trreater reduction was an utter impossibility, With i*£&va w taxation they

should have as little as possible. He thought that they were on the eve of a great mining boom, and if the Government were turned out —as he for one did not think they would —(Ironical laughter) then if the boom came the new ministry would get all the credit. He thought that next year the Government could still further retrench. The time had come when they must choose a representative and he hoped they would act with careful consideration. He warned them of the necessity of chosing the most experienced men in these critical times. He thought that new arrivals in the country should have the courtesy to wait until they were acquainted to some extent with the public men of the colony before they asked for their suffrages. (Cries of "No mud-throwing." "None of that.") Mr Tole then went on to speak in. favour of Protection. He objected to the nostrums of the Cobden Club being forced down the throats of the electors. Instead of free trade they would have free starvation. (Applause.) It mattered not a jot whether this Government was in or not, what they wanted was simply the best Government; from the people. The present Government was most democrating, prudent, and commercial. (Ironical laughter and cries of " What about the wire mattresses.") He should like to have seen more candidates coming forward for Newton. (Laughter.) It was said that Mr Garratt had come forward to split the votes. This Mr Garratt had explained and as a gentleman he must accept it. Mr Tole spoke at considerable length and was accorded a very fair hearing. Mr Tole concluded his remarks by saying that, as their model Evening Journal said, He was possessed of experience.1'

Mr Withy was received with uproarous applause and considerable hooting He said that it was no seeking of his that ho came last. He did not intend to indulge in personalities. He explained that he had no hand in bringing Mr Garrat out, and thought it his duty to exonerate that gentleman. Mr Tole had stated previously that he (Mr Withy) had ground his money out of the sweat of the people's brows and had said that he believed Mr Withy was an " estimable gentleman." There was something wrong in that at least. He might state that he came out simply because ho wan opposed to the present Goveminent. Mr Withy then spent time in criticising the past actions of the present Government. He stated that while professing to support land nationalisation, they had given away to a foreign syndicate 2J million acres of land, and that for the benefit of the South Island. He repeated that he was an out-and-out free trader, and if they wanted protectionists theymust neither return himself nor the present Government. (Applause.) He blamed the present Government for asking for a dissolution, for they had no grounds for hoping they would be returned by a reliable majority. (Applause.) It appeared to be a useless expense to the colony, though of course by means of that, the Ministers'] retained their salaries three months longer. He was not brought out by the temperance party although he was one of them and would be proud to have their vote. The fanaticalteetotallerswere radicals. They were going in for Local Option. He did not propose any claim to the Newton constituency and no man, had that right until after the 26th. Then two of them [ would require to be disappointed. Whether elected or not he wouid be perfectly content if the people were pleased. (Applause and cheers).

Mr Withy spoko at some length after which a show of hands was taken, resulting as follows: — Withy ... ... ... ... 153 Tole ■ ... ... HI Garrett 45 Mr Garrett demanded a poll. Both oandidatesthen returned thanks, and a Vote of thanks to the Returning Officer concluded the proceedings. Loud cheers were then given for the various candidates.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18870919.2.33.2

Bibliographic details

Newton., Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 219, 19 September 1887

Word Count
1,552

Newton. Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 219, 19 September 1887

Working