Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Waitemata.

The nomination of candidates for this electorate took place in tha Devonport Borough Council OlHce at noon to-day. About 80 elcctois were present. The Returning Officer (Mr T. W. .Seaman) who presided, opened the proceedings with a few general remarks upon the gravity and responsibility of the duty cast upon tho electors of returning a member to House of Parliament, and with some particulars with respect to the charges in the electorate. Ho concluded by inviting nominations.

Mr Edmund Bell proposed Mr Richard Monk as a lit and proper person to represent Waitemata. He was a well knotfn business man, and his record was unsullied. It was true that he was nofc a professional politician, but that was a recommendation m-his favor for the country had suffered too much already frouii professional politicians. Mr Monk was pledged to simplification of Government, economy in administration, and being unfettered by past traditions or political ties, his efforts would be directed to lessen the hold which our civil service had in the moulding of public affairs.

Mr William Buchanan seconded the nomination.

Mr Gascoigne had much pleasure in nominating Mr Reader G. Wood, and in doing so explained how this gentleman had been induced to come forward. Anxious to prevent a walk over by Mr Monk, and desirous of securing a candidate who should possess ths three grand requisites of political experience, independence, and the absence of any trammels of monies or of political party, they had picked upon Mr. Wood and promised him to com© out. His career was honourable, his reputation and ability unquestionable, and ho- had the talent and the experience neccessary to enable him to represent Waitemata, thus worthly to do the colony good service. Mr Geo. Lankham seconded the nomination.

. As there was no further nominations, the Returning Officer invited the candidates to address the electors.

Mr Monk reminded the electors that upon the decease of Mr Hurst last year, he was reluctantly induced to come forward as a candidate for the vacant seat. Had Mr Wood offered himself then he would not have contested the election. Now that he had sat as the representative of Waiter, mata in Parliament, he did not intend' to draw back from this contest for the very simple reason that he believed his own views were more in accord with the mind of the electors than the system of political economy with which his opponent had identified himself while in Parliament. And on the occasion, when . the crisis was so grave his opponent came forward with a perfectly colourless programme. As for. himself, he had served in the past session earnestly and conscientiously, and having done no political wrong, he felt assured that the electors of Waiteinata would not whimsically send him to the right about. He had grown up amongst them, and he yielded to no man in sincerity and singleness of purpose. He would exert himself to the very utmost to secure political feforo in the colony, and at no time in our history was this reform more urgently needed than at the presenttime. He could not help thinking that had his opponent while in Parliament exerted his abilities in accordance with his hustings pledges the colony might not be in the position that it now occupied.

Mr Wood said that lie certainly would not follow his opponent by abusing him. He respected Mr Monk, and he . had come forward only at the solicitation of the electors. Whatever might be the poll he would bo perfectly satisfied. If elected he would do his best for the electors under all circumstances, and if his opponent were returned he would be equally well satisfied, consoled as he should be with the reflection that he could again retire to the peaceful seclusion of his home, instead of being obliged to re-enter the turmoil of .political life. Mr Wood concluded by stating thai, he would address the electors on Wednesday evening next. In answer to questions, Mr Monk said ho would be very glad to see wages increased and 'ho would do his best to supply work for good \wje's,

that he opposed the truck system; and that he would not assist to closej the gum(ields during the summer months. The Returning Officer having read the clause requiring a deposit of £10 from each candidate Mr Wood handed, in his deposit. The Returning Officer announced that Mr Monk had already paid in his £10. A show of hands was then taken, with the following result :—

R. Monk... R. G. Wood

The Returning Officer having declared the result to be in Mr Monk's favour, Mr Wood demanded poll. The Returning Officer then read out the list of polling places on Monday week, and asked to be furnished in o-ood time with the names of the candidates scrutineers, and also with the statement whether such scrutineers were paid or not. On the motion of Mr Monk, seconded by Mr Wood, a vote of thanks was passed to the Returning Office*, which he duly acknowledged. This closed the proceedings.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18870917.2.48.4

Bibliographic details

Waitemata., Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 218, 17 September 1887

Word Count
843

Waitemata. Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 218, 17 September 1887

Working