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TABLE TALK.

Social, Theatrical, and Sporting.

(Fro.m Our Special Correspondent.)

London, July 13. The amount which the Queen herself wil]^ have to pay toward the Jubilee hospitali. ties is estimated at from £100,000 to £150,000.

Mr Matthews, from whomsnch great things were expected as Home Secretary, has proved an egregious failure. The Conservatives are furious at the manner in which he blundered over tbe Cass case on Tuesdayevening. The under-secretaries behind him saw clearly enough "the way the cat jumped " half an hour before the division, and urged their leader to give wav gracefully, but without result. Subsequently, it transpired that Mr Matthews and Mr Newton (the Marlboro-street magistrate) are personal friends, hence, of course, the former's dislike to meddling with the matter. So many of the new " Jubilee sixpences have been gilted and successfully passed as half-sovereigns that even Mr Goschen has taken fright and consented to their withdrawal from circulation. At the Crystal Palace no fewer than 30 of these delusive coins were accepted by thestall-holders in a single day. The denominations of the new money were omitted ('tis explained) in view of England shortly adopting a decimal coinage. The enterprising stock - brokers who "cornered" the value of the Jubilee fivepound pieces up to nearly £9 now learn with intense disgust that they aro being freely minted, and will continue to be produced so long as the demand for them continues.

" Dagonet " says quite tho most wonderful sight of the whole Jubilee was Queen Kapiolani trying to set her watch by the Automatic Weighing Machine at Charing Cross Railway Station. Lord Colin Campbell has been formally adjudicated a bankrupt. His debts amount to £15,622, his assets to £119. The Duke, you may remember, lent the young man £5,000 to carry on the divorce proceedings. His Grace's generosity and family pride were duly commented on at the time. It now, however, turns oub he took good care to secure himself by attaching some reversionary interests to which Lord Colin was entitled.

Lady Colin is even worse off than her husband (who has £400 a year, which no one can touch). Before the trial she was able to make money reviewing and writing for the papers; now none of thestaider journals care to employ her. Several "society" papers would accept articles published under her own signature, bub her ladyship will nob write thus—at any rate in England.

I am glad Mrs Bernard Beere means to visit Australia next year, for you will be quite delighted with her performance of Mrs Despurn in " As in a Looking Glass." Since Genevieve Ward surprised us with her powerful acting as the heroine of " For-get-me-not' there has been nothing quite like it. Mrs Beere's Australian repertoire will aalso include " Fedora" and " Masks .and Paces." I have not seen her in the latter, but report places her "Peg Woffington" second only to Mrs Bancroft's. "The Shadows of a Great City" is the title of the melodrama with which Miss Grace Hawthorne initiates her management of the Princesses' Theatre next week. The critics have with ono accord damned the new play "Givil War" at the Gaiety Theatre. Perhaps if Mrs Brown Potter had not played the heroine and Kyrlo Bellow the hero they might have been more merciful, but both arc unpopular with " the profession." "Curly" is as handsome as Over, though his erstwhile hyacinthine locks are sadly grizzled. I saw him on the Strand the other day, smiling tho same sad, sweet smile which tho Melbourne ladies used to find so irresistible years ago. The new Swedish prima donna Sigrid Arnoldson has made a genuine hit, and on the nights she sings at Drury Lane the scenes associated wibh the early days of Jenny Lind and Nillson are re-enacted. Already fabulous prices are being paid for seats to witness her first appearance next week in " Dinorah," an opera hitherto sacred to the unapproachable Patti. By-the-way, " La Diva," after hearing Mdlle. Arnaldson in " II Barbiere," is said to have remarked in French "Behold my successor !" The Duke of Westminster has a handsome 2-year-old brother to Ormonde^ called Ossory that will make its debut in the Middle Park Plate. Orbit, the Duke's colt by Bend Or, out of Windermere, which cut such a poor figure at Stockbridge, will also be reserved for the back-end meetings.

Benzon, the "Jubilee" plunger, has purchased a batch of yearlings from Robert Peck for £8,000. The lo.t includes a very handsome brother to Superba and Saraband by Muncaster—Highland Fling. Accord-ng to present appearances the Duchess of Montrose will win the St. Leger with Eiridspord. Merry Hampton's form has been much discounted by the poor figure cut by Quilp in the Northumberland Plate ; in fact, the former is probably one of the worst horses that ever won the Derby. Next to Eirispord, Mr Baird's Salisbury seems most likely to score at Doncaster.

The Chesterfield Stakes for two-year-olds, on Thursday, at Newmarket, fell to the Duko of Portland's Ayrshire after a severe race with Mr Peck's Bartizan, who was only beaten by half-a-length, Lord Hartington's Chaplet colt running into third place. The finest two-year-old at Kingsclere, bar Friars Balsam, is the Prince of Wales's Loyalty (brother to Paradox), bub he will not be started till the back-end.

" Dr. Phillips," the grossly realistic picture of -middle-class Jewish life, which created sucli angry cackling amongst the descendants of the Twelve Tribes three months ago, turns out (as I surmised at the time) to be by George Moore. The talented author of " The Mummers Wife " did not, however, produce this Zola-like fiction by himself. He was assisted by Mrs Herman Merivale (the wife of the dramatist), herself a converted or perverted Jewess. Hence the fidelity of many of the pictures. Mr Moore's new novel, " A Mere Accident," made its appearance last week and (despite much that is nasty and repulsive) contains some powerful writing. I fancy, though, that even the most devoted disciples of realism will shrink from the final chapters. Theso describe, with much elaborate detail, the mental tortures endured by the heroine, a refined and sensitive girl, who on the eve of wedding the man she loves, is assaulted and" ravished by a brutal tramp. The horrors caused by this " mere accident" are pictured in the most lurid language, and culminate in the unhinging of the unfortunate damsel's mind. She mistakes her horrified lover for the vile wretch who violated her innocence, ai d, shrieking as he attempts to kiss and soothe her, backs out of a three-story window, only to fall dead at her distracted father's feet. The greater part of the book, however, is taken up with an elaborate analysis of the character of the hero—a nob particularly interesting person. Cheap editions of Mr Moore's " Mummer's Wife " and " Drama in Muslin " have just been issued at 2s each. New 2s novels include Christie Murray's " Cynic Fortune ;" " Lady Blanksmere," by «- The Duchess " (not one of her best books); "Social Vicissitudes," by A. C. Phillips (very clever); and " The Outsider," by Haw ley Smart The last-named author, by-the-way, has just commenced a new novel n " The Illustrated London News," called •Saddle and Sabre,"

Vizitelly's have reduced the price of their translations of Zola's novels from 6s to 3s 6d. The new Boisgobeys are "The Red Camellia" (Chevalier Casso-Cou), "Fickle Heart" (Cocur Volant), a stupid story, and "The Nameless Man" (Une Affaire Mysteriense). The latter is one of the prolific Frenchman's earlier and cleverer works. Maxwell's have purchased the copyright of Boisgobey's last story, "The Felon's Bequest," and are bringing it out at 2s A" translation of Gustave Droz's racy "Papa, Mamma and Baby," is selling largely. Mudie refused to circulate it

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18870910.2.78.42

Bibliographic details

TABLE TALK., Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 212, 10 September 1887, Supplement

Word Count
1,276

TABLE TALK. Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 212, 10 September 1887, Supplement

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