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SPORTING.

TURF GOSSIP.

[By Hippona.]

The annual meeting of the Auckland Racing Club took place on Monday last. From the report and balance-sheet put before the members, it appears that despite the depression—which of course meant a falling off in the gate and totalisator receipts—the Club made a profit of L 2,350 over the four meetings held last season, each gathering showing a balance on the right side of tho ledger. The Spring Meeting resulted in a profit of L 66 5s Id ; the Summer Meeting of L 2,037 16s 7d ; the Autumn Meeting of L 179 16s; and the Winter Meeting of L 65 16s 7d. Now this must be deemed very satisfactory, especially when we come to compare it with the annual statement of the Canterbury Jockey Club. Their balancesheet presented at the meeting of members a few weeks back showed that their big Spring Meeting only resulted in a profit of L 1,450 17s sd, while tho Summer and Autumn Meetings showed losses of LBO6 18s 5d and L 204 lis 2d respectively. On that score, therefore, the members of the Auckland Racing Club have, good reason to congratulate themselves. The standing mortgage of £10,000 on the .course, and tho bank overdraft of £2,426 17s 4d are, of course, two ugly items to look at; but we must not forget the great amount spent by the Club in building the new grandstand, which I make bold to say far and away surpasses any similar structure in this colony. Further, tho sum of £966 12s hao been paid in the formation of tho muchneeded tan gallop, not to mention the amount, spent on the erection of the new totalisator houses in the paddock. With tho work of the new gallop almost completed and a good working plant to thoir credit, the Club only want a revenue during noxt season equal to that of last, and they will bo in a good position. Mr W. Percival's statement of accounts wero brought out at the meeting in a clear and satisfactory manner, and tho Chairman and working Committee'are deserving of the thanks of the racing public for their gratuitous services to the Club during the year.

The first forfeit for the Melbourne Cup, which fell due on Monday last, shows that no performers of auy vory great note dropped out, if we except Sheet Anchor and Grace Darling. Mr E. Mitchelson's Maua is the only ono of the New Zealand division whose name is missing. The next and final paymont is not due till the week before the day for decision of the race. Tho names of the horses scratched to date are Master John, Salvo, Krupp, Rosamond, Enfield, Wentworth, Abuse, Sheet Anchor, Physician, David, Mann, Louise, Pastoral, Grace Darling, Empress, Fernandez, Ettie, Shark, Littio John, The Pencil, Metal, Industry, and Plutarch.

The Auckland Racing Club's programme for next season may bo expected to bo made public in about a weok s time. It is intended to reduce the amount of added money, but tho Spring Meeting will in all probability extend over two days instead of one as heretofore. I hope to hear of tho now Committee cutting down the added money of the Derby to at least 500sovs., for there is no denying the fact that we are far in advance of the times.

The string of two-year-olds that Kean has under his charge at Kohimarama are all doing well. Pearl Shell, tho filly by Musket—Pearl Ash, is the most forward of the lot, but for size, looks, and substance Cuirasseur towers above everything, and is the gentleman of the party. Formo has just beon taken up again, but sho has not grown upwards sinoe last season. The jumpers Silvio, Magnesia, and Victory are being spelled.

Auckland is about to lose from the ranks of hor horse-owners Mr David Twohill, who intends settling down in Melbourne. Mr Twohiil in Jill probability leaves by next week's steamer, and ho will be followed soon afterwards by his brothor, Mr .Dan/Twohill. Cinderella, of course, will he taken over, and such a useful mare will no,doubt pay her way well. The Bros. Twohill belong, to the class of owners of whom we cannot afford to loso, and I am sorry to chronicle their intending departure.

As an instance of the way Silver Pi. inco is fancied for the Melbourne Cup outside of Auckland, I might mention that one of our local pencillers laid 200 to 12 against the colt to a Wellington client a few days ago, when the taker immediately wired back stating that he would accept another 300 to 18 about the son of Anteros. The Auckland layer replied '*300 to 21 the best price," and an answer came from the Empire City almost immediately snapping it up.

Mr J. O. Evett has been re-appointed handicapper to the Wanganui Jockey Club for next season. At tho annual meeting there was a proposal to have the handicapping done by a Committee of the Club, but after a full discussion it was decided tc re-appoint Mr Evett.

Acceptances for the New Zealand Cup are due to-night. George Wright tolls me that Fusillade will be an acceptor.

Torrent, one of the three representatives the Hon. W. Robinson has left in the New Zealand Gup, has' claimed some attention at the hands of local backers this week, the son of Apremont and Watersprite having been supported for small amounts at 100 to 8. Looking up Torrent's past career I find that he has only started on two occasions, viz., in the last Canterbury Derby, when he made the running for his stable companion Disowned, and in tho Maiden Plate at the Auckland Summer Meeting. In this last-named race, he ran second to Lady Norah, but he was suffering from fever in the feet. I think that I am safe in saying Torrent has not yet shown his true form, and if he goes on all right in his training, he iis bound to see a much shorter price in the market than ho is now quoted at. Torrent's New Zealand Cup impost is 7st 71b.

I had a look'at Brigadier the other day.. The son. of Musket has lately been fired on both of his forelegs, and Mr E. Halstead has made an excellent job of the work" . The services of such a well-made animal as Brigadier shonlst be eagerly sought after by breeders, arid I hope to hear this season of some of our local men mating a well-bred mare or two with him.

The adoption of the racing rules that have been in force for some time by the other New Zealand Metropolitan Clubs is a wise step on the part of the Auokland Racing Club. I am glad tp see, though, that the Club have retained from the old set those rules regarding the license of jockeys and the Distressed Jockeys' Fund, and they might with very great advantage be adopted by the Canterbury, Dunedin, Hawke's Bay, and Wellington Clubs. By the A.R.C. adopting the Metropolitan rules, there is now one uniform code throughout the colony.

From Napier I learn that 'there has been very little work doing amongst the local horses. Up to the present time most of them have been treated to a dose of physic, and are being got ready to put into steady work. Goosemari has the Musket—Fairyland colt in his Stable, and he has also ju&fc broken in a bay filly by Muiket—A'taJantoj; s

Southern papers state that Silence has shortened in price for the New Zealand Cup, and is now quoted at 100 to 12. Artillery has found supporters at the same figure, while Torrent is also in good request, the half brother to Stoneyhurst being backed at 100 to 6.

At the annual meeting of the Wanganui Jockey Club, the balance-sheet showed that the expenditure for the year had been L 3,498 7s lOd, or L 246 5s 5d in excess of the receipts. This is more than accounted for by the sum expended on improvements and repairs (L 329 16s). The amount paid away tor stakes totalled up to L2,<197 13s. Of this sum LI.OOO came from entries. The receipts from privileges and totalisators amounted to L 2.038 5s lid, andLl2B 14s from members' subscriptions. The finances of the Club are in a sound state, as its overdraft at the Bank has been reduced to L 125 17s lOd.

I hear a lot of talk about the bad state of the Ellerslie course during the winter months, but at Riccarton' it would seem to be at least equally as bad. This is what a Christchurch writer says when referring to tho matter :—lt was a fine forenoon, but I found the grounds dotted with pools of water, the sand gallop in a state of "sludge," some of the adjoining paddocks turned into lakes, and everything in as bad a mess as it could be. The blame for a good deal of the standing water is thrown upon the road board, who blocked up several gullies which used to carry off the storm water, and put down drain pipes instead of sufficient culverts.

Christchurch papers to hand giving details of the New Zealand Grand National Steeplechase state that previous to the start Mangaohone walked as if he was very sore. P. Higgins received such injuries whilst riding Mammoc in the race that be will be incapacitated from riding for some time, while Pearson broke his arm riding Romeo. In the Maiden Plate, Mr G. Ruther--ord's horse, Impostor, had his leg broken and had to be destroyed. Mangaohone, who was awarded 12st 71b, was scratched for the Consolation Handicap. Romoo, on the strength of his forward running in the Grand National, was installed a hot favourite for tho race. Master Guy fell early in the journey, and then Orient went to tho front, and won comfortably, so far that is as finishing in front; but unfortunately, on entering to scale, he was a \Va short of weight, and being disqualified Romeo was declared the winner.

" Warrior," the Sydney correspondent of the " Otago Witness," supplies the following Randwick training notes to that journal:—The Hon. James White's three-yeai-olds made their appearance. Abercorn, Carlyon, and Aberdeen soon commenced business. Starting from the threefurlong post, they came down the straight at a rattling pace, Aberdeen, on the inside, having a lead of half a length from Carlyon, who occupied the centre of the course, and Abercorn hugging the rails. Aberdeen forced the running as they neared the mile and two-milo posts, but at tho tan sheds the colts were all together, and remained so coming down the straight. Crossing the tan at tho entrance gate, Carlyon occupied the boat position. Turning by Cutts's cornor, .a sheet would havo covered them, but the Sydney Metropolitan horse, Aberdeen, again assumed the lead. Rising the hill he had to give way to Carlyon, who was running well within himself; following on his heels came Abercorn, the gallop finishing slightly in favour of the first named. Carlyon, who is a brown colt, by Chester from Moonstone, has greatly improved during the last month, which "is more than I can say for Cranbrook, who appears to be as fat as a bullock. At one timo I had hopes of Cranbrook proving Mr White's trump card next spring, but unless ho mends I must certainly advise my friends to keep their eyes on Carlyon and Aberdeen, the last-named for the Sydney Metropolitan, and Carlyon for the V.R.C. Derby. Of course I am not prepared to back up any prediction at this distant date, but judging from past experiences on the training tracks, I don't mind tipping on this 22nd day of July, 1887, the following ; Mr White's best for the Australian Jockey Club Derby should be Abercorn ; Sydney Metropolitan, Aberdeen ; Caulfield Cup, Volcano ; Victorian Derby, Abercorn or Carlyon (the latter my fancy); Melbourne Cup, Trident or Aberdeon. Arsenal (the winner of the last Melbourne Cup), Cairo, and Frisco exercised alone. Arsohai, his legs as sound as a bell, negotiated a mile and three-quarters in excellent time, pulling up very fresh. Cairo, looking beautiful, vl&s admired as he brushed down the straight, his easy machinelike movement meeting with approbation from the "knowledge birds presont. Frisco has much improved since his victory in tho Sydney Cup, and may bo heard of doing good deeds during the incoming season.

From last week's "Canterbury Times " I clip the following:—Nelson and Stonyhurst did a usoful half-pace gallop on Wednesday morning in company, and both the chestnuts looked wonderfully well. Nelson is moving better than reported last week, but what comfort thi6 fact may afford to his backers for the New Zealand Cup will be considerably discounted by a rumour to the effect that Major George will, if his horse trains sound, take him to Melbourne. Stonyhurst seems none the worse for the rattling along he has received during the week, and it is just possible that he may be seen at the post in the spring. The rest of E. Cutts's string are doing well, but Teredo has most unsightly hocks and makes a very suspicious noise. O'Brien's lot are well forward, and in addition to Hermitage, Sextant, Gipsy King, and the yearlings, Rose and Black is doing good work. Artillery and Butler's others aro going on fairly well, and Webb's pair, Ruby and the Wave colt, are regular attendants on the course. Bowie has Sultan in charge, and is making great progress with the colt. Moana is one of the most improved horses in training, and Armstrong and Mr J. E. Pilbrow have their charges in nice seasonable condition.

Speaking of the departure of the Hon. W. Robinson's team of horsos from Lyttelton, " Senex " writes :—On arriving at the wharf alongside which the Hauroto was lying, it appeared as if most of the inhabitants of Upper Riccarton had determined to leave the shores of New Zealand. There were owners, trainers, jockeys and reporters all mixed up together, and every one appeared anxious to inspect the accomodation provided for the nags and also to get a peep at the animals themselves. Of the accommodation all there is to be said about it is that it was complete in every way. Ample room in the boxes, for such they were, not stalls ; a liberal quantity of padding to prevent bruising the horses if heavy^ weather is experienced, and a good situation on board the ship between decks and just forward of the bridge. Neither expense nor trouble had been spared to make the passage attended with as little discomfort as possible to the animals shipped. But by the time we had had a good look at the quarters provided, the first of the occupants, the slashing Enfilade, had been quietly walked into the box on the wharf preparatory to being hoisted on board. In another minute he was swinging in mid-air, with his boy standing' perched across his neck, and in half a dozen "seconds he was safely ensconced in his snug apartment on board. Thunderbolt came next, and no sooner in his place than Silver Prince, conspicuous by his white marking, was seen coming along the wharf. If there was one of the lot who was likely to be troublesome when being shipped it was the colt who has been so freely backed for the Melbourne pup. When he was justriw* v-'* ' A\- the stearri whistle of the Wailv- vnofiite side of the, wh_rf ?■;* '._ jglve ufct'e'^'& faa-ifi' A;,

which was prolonged for 40 or 50 seconds amidst the execrations of those engaged in the job of handling the valuable stock that was leaving. For a moment it looked as if the colt would break away and play up, and indeed, he did jump once or twice almost amongst the railway points ; but at last he was quieted, though trembling a good deal. No further trouble took place with him, and he joined his shipmates safely, and was followed by the last oi the quartette in the shape of Disowned, who gave no trouble whatsoever. The owner of the team was looking on at the time, and superintending tho shipment of his pets, while the brothers CuttsNvere assisted by Derrettand Cochrane, who accompany the lot to Sydney, while R. Ray was a spectator, and an interested one, of the departure of his late charges. But Mr Robinson's were not the only nags going away, as Mirella was leaving by the same boat, and knowing this young lady's temperament, it must have been an anxious moment for H. Piper, who was with her when he got the irritable daughter of Hornby and Mireille into the box. When once in, he quickly blind-folded her, and before she had time to realise the situation she was on the 'tween-decks of the steamer. The little trotting pony Dot took things collectedly, and then many of the crowd moved back to the railway station after wishing bon voyage and lots of luck on the other side to the horse-owners and their staff of trainers and assistants.

The London journal " Truth " is responsible for the following:- The solemn service was progressing in Winchester Cathedral, and the Dean sat enthroned, when a telegram was handed to him. He opened it, and cast his eyes up to heaven in dire perplexity. It ran thus, " Ormonde has won." Who was Ormonde ? and what had ho won ? Vainly canons and such-like minor lights were consulted. If they knew they pretended not to. It was subsequently discovered that the telegram had been sent to Mr Dean, a trainer at Winchester, but as it was addressed " Dean, Winchester," it was handed to the Dean. The telegraph clerks were probably under the impression that this dignitary had put a trifle on the race, and had desired that the result should be at once forwarded to him.

The Melbourne scribe " Asmodeus" writes:—"A sensational jump is reported as having taken place at Caulfield. An eye-witness to the feat informs me that Lizette, with Batty in the saddle on the morning named, accomplished a leap which has probably never been equalled in Australia. My informant states that the mare, in negotiating the fence on the hill opposite the stable,* formerly occupied by the late Frank Leng, took off so far from the obstacle that the few specators present anticipated with horror a catastrophe, as it seemed impossible that she could elbar the jump. To the equal astonishment and relief of the watchers, however, the gallant daughter of Hieroglyph landed clear • and so impressed were those present with the performance that measurements were quickly taken, when it was found that Lizette had taken off 25ft. from the fence, and in her jump had cleared a few inches over 35ft."

The English press has recently been much troubled as to which is really entitled to distinction as the horse of the century, and while some vote in favour of Ormonde, St. Simon and Bendigo, "Pondragon" goes for St. Gatien, and says:—" If I were asked to say which was the best horse I ever saw I should have a difficulty. A performance as good as anything there is in this book was that of St. Gatien in the Cesarewiteh of '84. And if St. Gatien had done subsequently what I honestly and conscientiously believe he could have done but for untoward influence, no horse in this world could now take higher position. Last back-end I saw him win a race at Newmarket (Ditch in), cutting down his opponents in such style that if Ormonde himself had been in the raco I do not think he would have won ; yet only two days before St. Gatien had shown form so inferior that it has to be cast on one side whon discussing his claims on real quality. St. Gatien ran in the Derby, it is true, and it is funny how to think that his folk are afraid to run off the dead heat with Harvester—funny to think that if the dead heat had been run off good odds would have been laid on Harvester. '

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 183, 6 August 1887, Supplement

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3,355

SPORTING. Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 183, 6 August 1887, Supplement

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