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MAIL NEWS.

TOPICS O^JTHE DAY.

Steamship 'Collisions. June 3rd

have received news .-serioua accidents in England aud "r^oftheworld. The first was a 'tween twooftbe White Star lin e * the Celtic and tho Brittanic, rf steamer3,the^e Amer . »bol t T L- had ibnO-been for the prompt **I?m, f tbe captains, the loss of life «eld. f L.'Daily News" is the best. fSlSn^he voyage and tho sudden '^(.f-rr in which they were enveloped Hftingof Sent says that as the vessels was '_ screech from the Sri whistles, a nry of horror from the «*S_ passengers, a sharp crash, and J' two"g'eat iron contort ships were . 4hl wreck, with screams of agony *. i rtSiSiperillod crowds of passenf£ instead of being perpendicular to tho i-nfZ Britannic (tho vessel which was ffi.«a4lp^«Kecn«dib^oaa «_!_«.. of tho engine. . . • After a S nnquirynia|e in the steerage deEient, Where all the casualties occurred, Eve that the list embraces twelve tibdaod twenty wounded. Two children gSoman were horribly mangled, and. St have died instanly. Several men m knocked into the water. . . . Ainon- the severely wounded was an old U who lost both his legs, a woman who Mi Inn. aura man an eye. . Wta the captain ordered the men to tW the.boat-, several firemen eft their Mats and jumped into one of the boats, Ldi-e out the ladies who were waiting to be lowered. They rowed hurriedly to iheColtic;bu. later on, whon they found that tho Britannic was not going to sink at once they returned. As they crept up the lideoftheßritanpic, with shame showing in their faces, the captain greeted them with the simple comment ' Sbnmo on you, andfluydisappeared into the engine room. fort-ately, the two ships were able to go kktoj-cther to New York, and the loss of iiljnsnot greater than a dozen." Sicce then thoro has been a serious colliery accident near Glasgow, over two tiiworkmen being entombed ; there lata the fire of the tramway stables in Ncr York, in which 1,600 horses were k. to- death and property worth 11,000,000 destroyed ; nows trom Calcutta akipeaks of a cyclone in'which a vessel wi_ .00 persons on board disappeared. But the most terrible disaster of recent years has jus- taken place nearer home, in to ' •

Bornlug of Sty Opera Comiqae stPsria. As if to heighten the effect, only a fortnight before the accident there was a discussion in the i'rench Chamber about this very theatre, and the Minister re-ipons-ble for its safety, M. Bertholot, spoke ufollows:--". . • ■ Well, that is a

dangerous state of things, and it is in the mtaral order of things that tho Opera Comique Will be burned down some day. (Eiclamations of dissent,) Honourablo aembevs need not' cry ' Oh, oh !' There •listsno theatre that has not been burnt down in the course of a cen bury. Therefore we may be sure the Opera Comique is fated to be burnt down. (A laugh) I tope, however, that it will be put off as long a. possible." M Berf.helot was him»!f present at the time the fire broke out; sotoowasM. Goblet, the lat-o "°rime Minister: General 80-langer, the most popular minist-m-ranee; and General Snussier, tie Governor of Paris, who is the most popj)larand brilliant soldi, r in France after too War Minister" In" fact, the 'conflagration was nearly becoming historical for the quality, an well as the quantity, of its victims. The theatre iv'as crowded, especially l» th. upper parts, and ab least 150 persons Ens. have been burnt or sufFocafcccl to death. M. Tn. kin, tho manager, warned ty the motion in the Chamber, was prepared for the panic.'and came forward and to pcatfid a lew reassuring words that he W rehejircccl. j'n this way at least «> jives must-, have been saved, and forhis^self-po.session he is to be decorated ™> the Cross of the Legion of Honour. wme of the incidents were very distressing. J* B''lji.es'!says:—"The greater num«rof tho dead bodies recovered show by n n the face and bands that they wefceii cm-bed under the feet of the passing over them. In general wese victims ar« women An expression of morn-ark, the features in cases where M bate not been scorched or lacerated. Pnfrffln persons seem to have entered S b« attached to the galleries think Z, ,_ w a *ay oufe- once ine^o, E . _D.' 1(*V8 ih- Th* firemen, when preached this spot, found the bodies W"«ach other, with arms _nd S loiM as to form a solid SL" . Daily S "gives a grue*m*yT lhe moufch of one o? the \mnl7 was useless to try to &lll to.^ downstairs, so I . * mi i the window and stood before toll L T ,drauShfc k«P* me cold iLfl.. *« back, and what from uLw ed uWas either being burned Plavon J' l nvhen the P»mPs began to Sl^^^^dto^eath wiM.i»V iT? 0 r°of Jusfc over me some--1*53 tW In". bufe a "ver of nothing I» lead poared in through «*!&&?* at»c* I directed Its tfiffi^' {t fl? wecl off else * *%hb of iU i .Sphered where I Was, the *%l£ % *°ft havc brought down tho 4 4i a ._ w«« " apaiß :-"Two men and Pressed snnS-'' their gestures ex -d '«** ml Lm" fl-,R £ erself forward* fought tb a . ,v ■ d her back- It was *ttfiof hemS 6 w ™an ™.M get the J^- fflS!"' and dra S '*«« "to the S* to X T BB ¥"Zht ro"nd. but ttenslicednn.-^ rt* A-les«r o»e was I^cued, bubtL lt* and the unfortunates \V Cy o. [° m. ' S' as a ™™g l»na* a^bL\ lledea^are^'-y fashionr;^BSi c 6atlll" ef! a,e *° charred 50^ Possible by means SSS^^^'^ebodyof btikmSbtt ls blackened b>'the '^erß' offhi-*.- 11'^ eaVs> and 0" her wt»ch there i s ifftlo left, bub

bone, there still sparkles a largo diamond ring. . .Many will be recognised by the bracelets they wore."

Primrose I>ay.

Primrose Day has produced a new theory with regard to Lord Beaconsfield's connection with the flower. In early life when he wrote " Lothair " he mado Lord St. Jerome remark "that primroses make a capital salad," and for aught that his friends know, such continued 'to be Disraeli's sentiment until the day of his death. On tho day of his funeral, however, the Queen sent a huge wreath of primroses with a card on which sho had written, " His favourite dower." This was tho beginning of the primrose craze ; but the fact was Her Majesty wa3 not thinking of the Earl, but of her late husband, who was very fond of the primrose, and whom she generally signifies by tho words " his " and " him." Unfortunately, the revelation comes too late to destroy the political significance of the flower. The DerbyThat a favourito should not win is not quite a novelty : still, under all the circumstances, the defeat of The Baron came upon everyone as a surprise. Eighteen sporting prophets nominated him for the firsr. place ; only one suggested another horse, and oven he never thought of Mr Abington's Merry Hampton as a dangerous rival. Enterprise, the winner of the Two Thousand, wa3 expected to do something, but his shoulder) was put out ten days before the race, and at the last moment ne was scratched. It doesn't say much for the shrewdness of his grooms that they treated him for a strained knee for a whole week, and did not discover the mistake until Mr Hutton, the' bone-setter, pointed it out. As soon as bis name was struck through, The Baron, in spite of rumours about informality in his nomination and recollections of his laziness as a two yearold, was looked upon as quite safe. Tbe bookmakers, however, made a dead set against him at the last. The weather, too, had in no way spoilt the course ;at ono time it had threatened to be a repetition of the snows of 1867, and then none could foretell the result; but whilst the slight rain of the day before had laid the dust, a flickering nun brightened up the scene. Next to tho Baron, Eiridspord, who has since won the Grand Prize, was favoured. He had improved greatly since the spring, was generally expected to finish in the second place, and by the " Sportsman " reporter was pointed out as winner. But Merry Hampton.never having run as a two-year-old, was a " dark horse," and like Blair Athol, in similar circumstances in 18G4-, won quite easily. It is true that knowing ones consider the entries below proper form, but the fact remains that Mr Abington's colt covered the distance in a time that has never been beaten, and only equalled by Blair Athol and Kettledrum. Otherwise, the predictions wore tolerably on the spot; The Baron out-distanced all those whose form was known ; Martlcy has a style and fashion about him that made his success in the Jubilee Stakes seem aomething more than a fluke, and the running in the Derby justified the prophecies of his fetting a place ; whilst, Aintree, by coming omo tourth, verified the expectation of his stable. • The Prince of Wales and many other royalties, both English and foreign, were well to the front; but as an old trainer in the paddock remarked, "You don't, see much quality here to-day ; " and although he referred especially to the horse-flesh, his remark applied equally well to the human beings on the Downs. The truth is, the Derby was extremely dull. Entries were few, spectators less, than usual, and all the proceedings staid and decorous to a degree. All the old life and merriment on the road is dying out; the number of drags goes up, but chaff and banter "disappears ;~ the black coat and hat of the city and the club is omnipotent, and chokes off all indivi duality and fuu. .Parliamentary Loßg-Winded- . iiessLord Denman, the son of the famous judge of that name and brother to one of the present judges, has brought in a bill for shortening speeches in the two Houses of Parliament. He proposes that no Privy Councillor shall speak above ono hour, and no ordinary member exceed a quarter of an hour ; that a bell should be rung as soon as tho limit is reached, and that if anyone elso wants to address the House, the speaker must sit down. This would prevent a repetition of Mr Biggar's famous feat in reading from blue-books* for four hours continuously to waste time ; but perhaps it would not have much effect on what Lord Salisbury calls " the dreary drip of dilatory declamation." A Big BlastEngland is not the place for blasting on a phenomenal scale ; but, at Llanben's la3t week about the biggest on record took : place. A mass of roclc standing between two workings of the quarry and weighing four hundred thousand tens, endangered ' the lives of the men, bo a tunnel 118 feet; long was driven into the base of the rock', i This branched out into six deep chambers, each terminating in a .haft. Explosive: gelatine was built into each shaft, and the j "whole so connected with a vise that, it would explode at the same instant. Notice I was issued throughout, the- district warning people to open windows and doors, and l^avo thdr homes. The.advice was-taken: Prop™ ty-was packed up, cattle driven off; shops closed, ,and the highways guarded 'by police.' Gelatine equal'in power to two tons of gunpowder was exploded ; the rock was shattered and brought down into the quarry and the lake below. : J" Mall Coaches Revived. A most unusual scene took place last week in ono of the busiest thoroughfares of the city. Mr Blackwood, secretary at the Post Office, has instituted a revival of tbe old mail coaches for carrying parcels from London to Brighton during the summer, and the first of these, in making a trial journey, revived a tradition of older days. The driver came to a point' at which the traffic is for convenience regulated by the police, but aI, which he did not wish to be j delayed like ordinary vehicles. He j therefore - burst through the line, I but a police - sergeant, at once stopped the horses. The driver refused 'to go back, and maintained that Her > I Maje-ty'- mail could not be stopped on the Queen's highway by any person whatever without the consent of those in charge of it. He refused to give his name, and pointed to the royal legend on the panel of the coach as his authority. Finally, after the traffic had been stopped for ten miriutes the dr-Vet was dragged from his'"sea., gave'

up his name, and drove off with a defiant blast of his horn amidst deafening cheers fi-oln hundreds of per.ons who had crowded round. The Abrtrijriucs. Sir William McArthur-whoso nephew, by tho way, lias just succeeded in maintaining one of tho Cornwall constituencies in the Gladstonian party, and who is almost the only '-native" of Australia in the English Parliament - took the chair the othor night at the Aborigines' Protection Society. There was a general opinion that tho natives of West Australia had boon most cruelly treated in somo cases, and that a Government inquiry was desirable. Tho Rev. J. Chalmers, of Now Guinea, protested against the subjection of tha natives to Queensland rule ; he was afraid of tho introduction of fire-arms'and spirits, and of slave labour being taken for the sugar fields in Queensland. The intoxicant question provoked a reference to Tawhaio and the Maoris. This same missionary gave vent to a curious opinion, at the meeting of the London Missionary Society, about the way Christianity should be preached in New Guinea. His antipathy to Roman Catholics oxcludes a friendly emulation in good works. He complained bitterly ol the fact that when they had opened up the country, and made it safe for anyone to enter in the Roman Catholics had begun missions side by side with theirs. " I cannot think it is gentlemanly," he said : "at any rate it is not Christianity " (?). At the meeting of tho Religious Tract Society, the Rev. W. W. Gill, a member of tho same Missionary Society, spoke most hopefully of the natives of the South Seas and New Guinea, and said that they would gladly refund to the Society the cost of translating and producing biicii hooks as tho "Pilgrim's Progress, which wero very popular amongst them. 9-i.s---ia._eo.is. In the 'Graphic" of May 28th appear a number of engravings illustrating the recent outrage on the Premier of Tonga. The drawings aro acknowledged as having been supplied by Mr VV. Boodle, and tho descriptive letters provided by Mi E. E. Bilbrough, both at Auckland. Dr. Parker, who has been asked to take the pastorate of the late Mr Ward'Beecber, threatens to visit Australia on his return journey. A Dr. Dale and a Mr Spicer are coming out to tho Antipodes as representatives of the Congregational Church, and Dr. Parker- will come to test and nupplo meat their work. The torpedo boats, which were going to do such great things, soem rather a failure after all. Twenty-four of them have jnst been exercising off Portland, one of the trials being a ninety mile raoa. One blew up her boiler, another hud to put out her fire to prevent hucli a disaster, two collided and smashed up, a fifth broke her screwpropeller, and seven others, making just half the squadron, had their engines partially disabled. L4O a dozen is a fairly high price for 7_ champagne to fetch in these hard times, yot that was tho price given for soma pcrrier touet at Christie's sale lust week.

Lord Delcval "Beresford. youngest brother of the popular Lord Charles, has been rather more successful than several other patricians who have gone out to a cattle rancho in the far west. After three years' hard work in New Mexico he has made his large .peculn tion pay very well, and hope* soon to be able to spend the greatci portion of the year in England whilst his subordinates look after the estate.

A novel marriage ceremony has just been invented by a collier near Bolton. He took his fair charmer to Wigan to be married, but persuaded her that jumping over a long brush lkndle was all that. w;is necessary. This ceremony was duly performed, they returned to Bolton as « married couple ; bit the nuptial knot thus tied has proved somewhat insecure, as the wife has since left him, taking Mir wages with her.' Mr G. R. Sims"has had a quiet fling at the Jubilee craze," and has offered a Jubilee prize, consisting of a bean bi fully executed portrait of our gracious Queen, to the editor of any newspaper published in London whose columns do not, during the next week, contain either of the following words: "Jubilee," "Buffalo Bill," or'•lreland." Everybody is utterly sick of the word, for wherever we go " Jubilee this " or " Jubilee that " stares us in the face from every shop window. But it will be hard to beat " Jubilee dripping, fivepence a pound," as displayed in a shop in "Drury Lane. A Parsee barrister, who has been studying in England,"was interviewed by a correspondent of the " Pall Mall Gazette " a few days ago, and is reported to have mad© tho following observations :- " Then instead of your soldiers receiving backsheesh and a feast, what happens ? The paymaster ser geant Cutß off a day's j>ay to devote it to one of their funds. It means that for a week every time the soldier puts his hand into his pocket and finds no tobacco, ho curses. Will it be the same in India ? Well, in India the subject of this Jubilee is altogether beyond comprehension. It is so utterly inconsistent wilh our traditional customs under which the throne dL.pen.itx. the charity and backsheesh, that t„ be asked to t^ive backsheesh to the throne is simply staggering: It is not. called a tax, so it must be backsheesh."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18870722.2.51

Bibliographic details

MAIL NEWS., Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 171, 22 July 1887

Word Count
2,957

MAIL NEWS. Auckland Star, Volume XVIII, Issue 171, 22 July 1887

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