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TURF GOSSIP.

[By Hippona.j

The weights for the Easter Handicap and Steeplechase, tha two principal events of the Auckland Racing Club Autumn Meeting, have been the main topic of conversation this week, and although there has been some diversity of opinion regarding the compilation, I think that with Foul Shot out of the road in the former, there is now little to find fault with. There can bo no doubt, though, that Mr Evett let Foul Shot off too lightly, and immediately the weights were posted he was pounced on as the most leniently treatsd horse in the handicap. The hanJicapper's invariable good luok, however, once more stood him by the pen being run through the name of the son of Musket and Slander on Monday last. Without wading through the chances of each of the candidates, I take the three most worthy of support to be Cinderella (7st 101b), Necklace (Oat 61b), and Victoria (7st 71b), and the winner should come from one of the trio. For the Steeplechase, Mangabone has been let off very lightly with 9st 101b, and as he brings excellent credentials with him from Napier, he should well repay watching. The acceptances for both races will be found in another portion of this issue.

The withdrawal of Foul Shot from all of his engagements at the Auckland Kacing Club Autumn Meoting.l understand, is due to the colt's legs troubling him. His defection will cause the St. Leger to loco a lot of its interest, as the contest between him and Waitiri would probably have boon worth travelling a long journey to witness. Tho Hawkesbury Kacing Clup Autumn Meeting commences on Thursday noxt. The Hawkesbury Handicap, which will probably give a time as to the winner of tho Sydney Gold Gup, comes up for decision on Saturday. The following are the names of tho horsos who have accepted for tho Sydney Gold Cup:etlb stlb Sheet Anchor ..9 3 Silvermine ..7 3 Nelson .. ..9 0 Uralla . .. 1 1 Tom Brown .. 810 Ringmaster ..7 2 Tempo .. ..8 8 Margrave.. .. 612 Matchlock ..8 5 Chieftain.. .. 612 SiverKlng ..8 4 Lancer .. .. 612 Mozart .. ..84 Remus .. .. 610 FirstChesctr ..8 2 Arsenal .. .. blO Oatcake .. ..8 2 The Jewel . 610 Priucelmperial.. 8 2 Perchance .. « 10 Minerva .. .80 Msroondah ..68 Britisher .. ..8 0 NewYcrk .68 Cerise and Blue 713 Pet Girl .. ..66 Fraud (lute Wing) 7 11 Florence .. .. • 6 M-nte Clu-ieto ..7 9 BonnloDoon .. 6 1 Brown and Rose 7 » Kill, shot .. ..6 4 Ouloola .. ..7 7 Kurriltta .. ~f 2 Cyclops .. ..7 6 Ferndale .. ..6 2 Privateer.. ..7 6 Pe. rees .. .. 6 0 Folly .. ..7 4 Eclipse .. ..6 0 Preston .. « 7 i Tramp .. ..6 0 First Princa ..7 3 Last advices state that betting on the race is very dull pending the arrival of the Victorian metallicinns in Sydney. Silver Kingia nominally first favourite at 100 to 8, and Tempe and Matchlock are supported at a point less. General entries and acceptances for the Auckland Autumn Meeting are due on Friday next. The first forfeit for the St. Leger and Mares' Produce Stakes (for two-year-olds) must also be paid. Looking over the detailed accounts of the Taranaki races that appear in the local papers, I notice that the owner of Bayard lodged a protest against Victoria on the grounds of crossing in the straight, but the stewards disallowed it. In the Autumn Handicap on the second day, Cinderella was ridden by her trainer E. Kelly, and she was made a warm favourite. Both The Druid and Macaroni started for the Steeplechase, but evidently were never in the 'chase. The totalUator paid the nice dividend of £11 2a on the winner Black Prince. Wideawake, the second horse, carried 181b over-weight.

From Napier I learn that Percy Martin has got Forerunner (Vanguard's half-brother) in work again. The horse has been in lavender for some time, "Mazeppa" gives the following figures of the added money given by the four leading New Zealand racing clubs during the current season: — Canterbury : Spring «5.080 Bummer 1,820 Autumn J.IOO £9.000 Auckland : Bprinn .. *680 Summer 1.150 Autumn 1.650 Wlater __6» £7430 DUNKDIN : HuntMeetlDg *330 Sprln* .. .. 1.530 Autumn <J,77a Aunlvoißary .. .. 2*5 Winter _U2» *7,01fi Hawkk'sßay: Spring •• - £l.« 0 Summer 800 Autumn .. 2,350 Winter _JlO £5.000 Welcome Jack has certainly been a mystery to New Zealanders over since he left these shores, and the latest to hand about the erstwhile champion is that Messrs Yuille and Co., the well-known Melbourne auctioneers, have him for private sale. Mr F. Hill,owner of our old friend Speculation, became bo disgusted with the mare's running at the Taranaki Meeting that he parted with her. Mr D. Fraser, the wellknown sportsman and breeder at Marton, is her new owner, and I am informed £150 was the price given. I have to acknowledge the receipt of the programme of the Dunedin Jockey Club Winter Meeting. At the recent Nelson races, the Selling Hack Race on the second day caused quite a scene. Only three horses were entered, and Maori Boy won, May being second. It appears, however, that May, who is the property of Mr J, Sanders, could have won, and when ehe returned to tne paddock there was considerableexcitemsnt,and one gentleman would have done some mischief with a stick but was prevented by the police. The stewards held a meeting and disqualified Mr Sanders, the owner, and Skinner, the jockey. The mare, May, ras claimed by Mr H. Hansen on payment of the selling price and?stakes added, and took delivery of her upon depositing £30 with the stewards. The action of the stewards elicited rounds of applause. Tha Melbourne writer " Newmarket ' in referring to "Beacon's" remarks anent the Hon. W. Kpbinson and his horses, and which appeared in these columns last week, says the whole statement will be an eyeopener to those who know the run of the ropes in Victoria. Ho adds :—lt was well known among racing men here that our New Zealand visitor, was not satisfied with his sojourn in our midst. Various causes were assigned for the feeling, but among the more temperate of our turfites, who are generally able to get at the bottom of a grievance, the discomfiture of the Maoriland sportsman was ascribed to disappointment, engendered by an exaggerated idea of his horse's capabilities. It is true that Winchester showed such form on the training ground to justify the conclusion that he possessed an excellent chance for the Australian Cup In the race, however, the colt failed to run up to reasonably-concluded expectations, and the result was that his owner, who had backed the son of St. George to win a good stake, lost his money, and, I might add, his generosity too. " Warriori" in givinghis impressions of his visit to Sylvia Park says :—" I feel confident that if the Hon. James White had been with me, or iffce should be present at the yearling sale nMtfOtoßuary, he will certainly become the purchaser of the daughter of Musket—Sylvia, for she is one of the finest fillies evtr foaled south of the line — the dead image of Martini-Henry."

An action, B. Lee versus Austin Saqui, which will shortly come on for hearing in the Melbourne Supreme Court, is just now causing considerable sensation among Australian sportiug men. The action, which is for the recovery of £2,000 for slander, is decidedly very peculiar. According 10 the plaintiff, he made awager last year with Mr Saaui, tho bookmakor, on two ' doubles, taking on each bet £1,000 to £3. One of I these doubles was Nordenfeldt and Sheet Anchor. Mr Lee alleges that he gave Mr Saqui a cheque for £6 at the time the bat was made, and that Mr Saqui wrote the particulars of both wagers on Lee's cheque butt and signed his name. Nordonfeldt and Sheet Anchor won the Derby and Cup respectively, and Lee claimed his £1,000, but Saqui refused to pay, alleging that the writing on tho butt of Lee's cheque book wua a forgery. Hence the action for slander against Mr Saqui. It is further stated that Air Lee, before commencing the action for slander, sought to become a member of the V.R.C., in order to be enabled to bring the matter before the Committee, but he was kept out by some moans or other. Another curious matter in connection with this case is that Mr Saqui actually paid £1,500 to Sergeani Corbott, of Hotham, over tho same double, and why he should refuse to pay Mr Lee seems quite inexplicable, as Mr Saqui has always borne a good name on the turf. On the other hand, it is stated that there was no doubt whatever that Mr Saqui had received the cheque from Mr Lee. A nice little instance of the biter bitten occurred in connection with the recent Nelson races, and is thus recorded by the Wellington scribe "Vigilant:"—lt appears that on the second day Erebus was made a big favourite for the hurdle race. At the last moment, however, it was evident from the persistent offers te lay him on the part of certain gentry, who are not over-fond of opposing anything " good," that there was a screw loose somewhere. Orient, who had been up to this time negleoted, suddenly became extensively patronised in the totalisator, and the backers of Erebus began to

look blue, for the aspect of affairs waß anything but reassuring to them. In fact, it may be said that "an ancient and fish-like odour " p3rvaded tho atmosphere, and many and anxious were the inquiries as to the cause. It was too late to get out, and beyond some of the Erebus admirers shifting a few pounds on to Orient, the bulk of them had to stick to wagers that were apparently hopelessly lost before tho race started. Allan Herd, who rode the reported "dead-un," was aa mum as a mouse, and whatever he knew he kept to himself The race began, and Erebus taking the lead from the jump, won hands down. The scene which followed was a counterpart, so I am told, of the scene in the Auckland paddock after the victory of Alaric in the Summer Steeplechase Words were few, but if looks could have killed, Herd's chance of lifo would have been a poor one. It was evident that certain clever persona who had laid themselves out to " do " tho public had been done brown themselves; and deep, if not loud, were the cursos they muttered, and both loud and strong were tho public expressions of joy at their confusion. Ido not profess to explain the ma and outs of this strange affair; but if the result teaches sotno smart folks thelosson that whon they play with edged tools they are likely to cut themaelvee.the incident will not be without its usoful sido. One of the greatest attractions of tho racing season at Homo will be the meeting of St. Gation, liendigo, and the crack three-year-old, Minting, in tho Eclipse Stakes (£10,000), to be run next July. Tho three have already been backed at lovol mocoy against the field, and, all going well, Mr Hammond's great gun, St. Gatien, is likuly to start a tremendously hot public favourite. Brilliant as St. Gatien and the youngster may be, tho most consistent public horeo of the lot is Bendigo, whose handicap periormancts rank second to none in the old country, extending, as they do, over four years.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18860410.2.39.4

Bibliographic details

TURF GOSSIP., Auckland Star, Volume XVII, Issue 85, 10 April 1886

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1,895

TURF GOSSIP. Auckland Star, Volume XVII, Issue 85, 10 April 1886

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