Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TURF GOSSIP.

[By Hipfona ]

Nelson onco more covored himself with glory in the Dunedin Cup on Wednesday, making his fifth successive victory. It would appear from the details of the race though, that ho hud tho Btvorest task that has been set him this 6:aßon, and after a tremendous struggle in the straight, he just managed to get home by a neck from Necklace. The featuro of the race certainly wae tho splendid form shown by Mr J. Maishall's maro, and to say the least it was hard lines on (ho popular owner of the "black and white" that he ivas called on to meet such a clinker ns Major Coorgo's horse has proved himself to bo. On the other hand, Mr Marshall's second string, Derringer, appoars to have cut-up in a very indifferent manner, and ha failed to make himself conspicuous at any part of tho journey. Now that the race has joined the past, I think it may not; be out of place to accord a word of praise to Major George for the admirable way in which Kelson has been raced in his various engagements, and it ia not too much to say that had he been in many hands he would either have been sold or in the hands of tho " undertakers" many weeks ago. Another pleasing feature in connection with the race is that the horses who filled the places were owned by three straight-going eportsmon, and for whom it ia always a pleasuro for the turf scribe to chronicle a triumph. The Autumn Meeting of the Victoria Bacing Club commences at Flemington this afternoon, the two principal events set down for decision being the St. Leger and Newmarket Handicap. On Thursday next, the Australian Cup will bo contested, and I shall expect to see it won by Winchester. The Napier Handicap has drawn forth a splendid apceptance, for out of the 20 weighted by Mr Evett 20 paid up on Tuesday night. Tha race gives promise of furnishing an excellent contest, and I shall expect to see Pearl and the boat of Mr Marshall's string lighting out the finish. The following are the names of those who piid up :— st lb st lb Pasha .. .. 812 .Speculation -75 Turquoise. .. 812 Mystery .. ..7 4 Pearl .. ..8 0 Humour .. ..7 4 Waitlri .. ..8 0 Libeller .. ..7 3 Neckluce .. .. 713 Tctford .. ..7 1 Salvage .. .. 7 12 Victoria .. ..7 0 Derringer.. .. 710 Soudan .. .. 613 Herculunaoum ..7 8 Snapshot .. .. 612 Kjrlemun .. ..7 7 Tlio Laird .. li 10 Cinderella .. ! E Bonny Blink .. (i !) I am glad to see that tho Takapunu Jockey Club havo made a move to secure a portion of tho foreshore from the Harbour Board. Should they succeed in thoir endeavours, they will bo able to co enlarge their race course as to make it one of tho best outside of Auckland, while it will add to the attractions of their meetings threefold. ■During the last few days, I understand that a now racing syndicate cotnposod of saveral well known local gentlemon has boon formed. . The horces will bo raced in tho name of Mr J. Balraain, and Mr J. B. Williamson has been ongaged to act as trainer. The lease of the stallion Ingomar by tho New Zealand Stud Comp my has now terminated, and it whs the intontion of tho directors to send tho horso back to Christ - churcb, hut at tho request of his owners ho ia to be kept at Sylvia I'ark during tho winter. The Onohunga Racing Club have docided to hold their Autumn Meeting on the Ist May, and a programme of seven events has been drawn up, among which are v Steeplechase of So?ovb. The leading flat ruco is the Winter Oats Handicap of SOsovs. The Australian papers to hand this week state that it is quite possible Nordenfetdb will never stand another severe preparation. The injury to his lef> it seems was caused by one of the bandages on bis forelegs getting unfastened, and a lad who was riding another of Mr White's horses at exercise noticed it trailing on the ground, and at once calling the attention of Nordenfeldt's rider, to that fact, the horse was pulled up and tho bandages adjusted. It is conjectured that Nordenfe'.dt must have trodden upon the loose bandage, and either struck or wrenched his near foreleg, which filled badly. The result of the Dunedin Cup on Wed needay was looked on ac such a foregono conclusion for Nelaon that even on the day there was 'absolutely no wagering on tho race here. All of the local metallicians aro losers to a greater orleeserexterit by Nelson's victory, but their Southern brethren do not fare co well, nearly all of them during tho time of our Summer Meeting having laid thehonefor considerable uraountain doubles and straightout. The totalisator is making ita appearance in New South Wales. The Clarence River Jockey Club have announced their intention of petitioning Parliament to allow them the use of the machine, while the same Club ore also endeavouring to get other registered clubs to join them in the same end. At a recent meeting of the Wellington Bacing Club, it was recommended that the fines inflicted on various jockeys at the Summer Meeting be remitted in consideration of their excellent conduct during the meeting after being fined. ■ The English sportwg papers are again agitating to get the rule which makes the entry of a horse void on the death of his ■ nominator altered. Two months ago a promising two year old called Deuce of Clubs, engaged in the Derby and other race*, wai sold by auction for 3,500 guineas. Sines ■ then Mb nominator, Mr Charles Brewer, has died, and the colt is disqualified for most of his valuable engagements. "Bleys," in "Bell's Life, refers to the Australian rule on the subject being ft great improvement upon the English law. The same paper also compliments the V.R.C. upon its rule which insists upon horses being named before they start, but suggests that somo confusion would occasionally be saved by making owners name at least a week before the race. A curious case, arising outjof a disqualified horse, lately occurred, saya a Melbourne paper, at the mooting of the Junee Racing Club, New South Wales. Toryboy, the horse in question, it appears, won a race at Junee, after which a protest was lodged against him on the ground that he was under sentenco of disqualification in Victoria. The " Victorian Racing Calendar " contains the following in its register of disqualification: "Floater (late Toiyboy), Coleraine, New Year's Day meeting, 23rd January, 1883, fraudulently nominated." It so happens that the foregoing wag not recorded amongst the A..1.C. disqualification?, and on these grounds the local club dismissed the protest. In order to provide against a recurrence of such cases it would be a* well were tho A J.C . to publish the V.R.C. disqualifications, and vice versa. Many owners show the greatest ingenuity in giving queor name's to their horses, and the Duke of Hamilton is specially noted for this practice He owns a filly called Miss Jummy, and people have often wondered from where this curious name is de- ! Hved. According to "Truth," it appears that the Duke of Portland is known among ' his intintes as «• Jumbo," and their pet ' namo for' him Is "Jummv." Now, as the Duke ot Hamilton's flly is out of Lady Portland, his Grace conceived that he was pajing his friend and fellow peer a compliment by calling her ViMies Jummy" Pence the absurd nomenclature;

Speaking of tho recent decision given at Wellington with regard to the totalisator case, the Wellington " Post " says :—lf the decision given by Mr Resident Magistrate Wardcll in tho caso against the Island Bay Kacing Company is correct in law, it may bo regarded as the death-blow to the totalisator. It would be utterly impossible for tho Logislaturo to permit the law to romain as Mr Wardell interprets it, and we may bo quite sure if Parliament is called on to rovieo its legislation regarding the totalieafo r, it will sweep all mention of that instrument off tho statute book. Under tho roading of tho law which was upheld yesterday, tho totalisator can legally bo used for the purposes of unlimited swindling. Tho public who deposit monoy in it havo no security that thoy will, let what horso rqay win the race, even got a penny of the monoy back. Tho unfortunato poseossor of a licenpo from tho Hon tho Colonial Secrotary is at liberty to tako as much monoy as tho public chooso to invost, and walk away with it in his pocket, quietly telling thoso who ought to get v dividend that they have no legal claim and are quito at his mercy. Tho only law a dishonest licensee would havo to foar would bo lynch law, and by a timely departuro from the course this might bo evaded. It may oven bo doubted whether on yesterday's ruling any omployo ongaged by tho licensee to assist in working tho totalisator could be punished if ho choso to put the monoy received from investors into his own pocket instead of into his employer's till. Certainly tho Logislaturo, when agreeing to legalise the use of the totalizator, never intended to placo all investors in tho instrument wholly and entirely at tho morcy of the licensee. In making tho use of the instrument legal, andsurrounding thegranting of licenses for it with certain precautions, the evident inteotion w.ib to give security for fair play to thoso who invested in the instrument; in fact, to render tho investment a strictly legal proceeding, protected by law. We do not desire to raise any question as to the correctness or otherwise of Mr Wardell's reading of tho Act, or to refer in any way to tho merits of tho particular case. It would be improper t.i do so. Our sole object is to point out what must be the inevitable result if the interpretation ia correct. We havo on previous occasions alluded to the abuses which have grown up in connection with the use of the totali«ator, and tho too groat facility with which licenses for its use aro obtainable. The restrictions and precautions with which the Legislature surrounded the issue of licensee are, it is well known, violated and evaded both in letter and in spirit, and the instrument is constantly used, under cover of the Colonial Secretary's license, for purposes entirely foreign to those for tho encouragement of which its use was legalised It is used as an instrument wherewith money may be made by individuals for their private benofit, instead of for the encouragement of racing under the management of a properlyauthorised racing club. This was certainly never i itomle 1. For a long time past (the feeling has been steadily growing up amongst ths genuine supporters of racing as a sport that the effects of legalising the totnlisator have been directly contrary to thoso expected and desired ; that, in fact, it has proved injurious, instoad of beneficial, to the real interest of racing Mr Warden's reading of the law, if it be correct, will intensify this feeling, and, we believe, render it so strong that the fato of the instrument will be finally settled as soon as the attention of Parliament is called to the subject.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18860227.2.30.4

Bibliographic details

TURF GOSSIP., Auckland Star, Volume XVII, Issue 49, 27 February 1886

Word Count
1,889

TURF GOSSIP. Auckland Star, Volume XVII, Issue 49, 27 February 1886

Working