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THE RACE FOR THE EPSOM DERBY.

History ot the Dead Hoat.-Excitlng

Soono.

(From our Own Correspondent. )

London, May 31. Derisv Day broke cold and cheerless, but the weather had little effect on the attendance, which was, as is ever the case, "tho largest on record." From eight in the morning till two in tho afternoon tho 18 miles of road between London and Epsom was one unbroken line of vehicles. The two railway companies despatched no less than 128 special trains from various stations in the metropolis to the Downs, and in addition excursions were run direct to tho course from all the great provinci 1 cities. Once again I was amazed at the orderly manner in which the extraordinary traffic on this day of days is managed. Arriving at Victoria coon liter noon, I found hardly any crush to speak of. We filed on in line to the platform, where tho train filled, and left in about three minutes, its place being Immediately taken by another. Arrived on the course, I repaired to tho paddock, where the Derby horses were having their toilettes put to rights. The three I fancied were Mr Rothschild's Talisman, Mr Gerard's St. Medard,and Mr Hammond's St. Gatien. Wood rode tho latter, ond that, in itself, was enough to make many people go "nap" on the colt. At a quarter to three precisely fifteen runners were telegraphed, and a few minutes later Mr Long's Condor headed the parade and exercise canter, in which St. Medard and Talsman seemed to go best. The feature of the betting was the general decline of the favourites, who were all o point or two easier when the full strength of the field was guaged.

The Derby Stakes of SOaovs each, h ft; oolts, 9st; fillies, Bat 91b; second (cccived SOOsova, and tnird liOsovs; about a mile and a half, starting at the New High Level Starting Post. 189 subs.

Mr J. Hammond'Bb c St Gation, by Rotherhlll or The Rover—St Editha(C. Wood) .. t Sir J. Willoughby 's br o Harvester, by Sterling— Wheatear (S. Loatea) .' t Sir J. Willouehby's eh f Queen Adelaide, by Hermit—Adelaide (P. Webb) 3 Also ran:—St. Medard IF. AfAcr), Talisman (T. Cannon), Loch Ranza (J. Watts), Brest ( \. Wainright). Waterford (J. Osborne), Bedouin (Giles), Richmond (C. Loatcs), Bcauchnmp (C. Bowman), Borneo (W. Piatt), Condor (11. Morgan), Woodstock (J. Gootcr). Hopeful Dutchman (G. Marks). The betting at the start waa: 5 to - agalnßt Queen Adelaide, 6 to I against St Medard, 7 to 1 against Talisman, 10 to 1 against Richmond, 100 to 8 against St Gatien. 100 to 7 against Harvester,

The field was sent away to a splendid start, the whole fifteen running well together for about a quarter of a mile. St. Gatien then showed! in front, but Wood pulled him back, and Borneo took up the running, followed by Richmond and Waterford. As they swept round Tottenham Corner the colours of the former and Borneo were still prominent, Queen Adelaide lying in a comfortable place behind the latter, with Harvester and St.- Gatien on the outside. By this time the chances of St. Medard and Talisman had been extinguished, and Beauchamp also seemed to be dropping behind. Entering the straight, Queen Adelaide was blocked r>y Borneo, who prevented her getting through, and by the time the latter compounded Webb had resolved to take tho outside. Meanwhile St. Gatien drew well to the front, closely pursued by Harvester.at the sight of whose colours in such a position the crowd literally yelled with mingled surprise nnd mortification. The pair drew right away from Queen Adelaide and Waterford (who assumed third and fourth places respectively), and then .a race such as has seldom been seen even at Epsom ensued. Opposite the Grand Stand St. Gatien led by fully half a length, and loud shouts proclaimed his easy victory. Loates,' however, was by no means done with. Ascending the hill he drew his whip, and administered a severe rib-binder to Harvester. The colt answered with "the utmost gameness, literally seeming to leap forward, and the pair ran post the judge's box locked together so closely that no one save that sapient functionary himself could pos sibly say which was victor. For a minute the betting ring literally boiled with excitement, all sorts of wagers as to the result being taken and offered. Then the numbers went up 1 and 15 in a line with 2 (Queen Adelaide) third. The latter, I ought not to forget to mention, ran a great mare at the last. She was overhauling the leaders rapidly, and but for her ill-luck in being blocked would have been very near winnin». Waterford was fourth and Brest fifth. The result did not please the populace, and very little cheering ensued when Sir John Willoughby and Mr Hammond elected to divide. St. Gatien was emphatically the " sharps " horse, all regular followers of the turf being on him to - man, but the Btrange doings in connection with Harvester made his port of the success the reverse of palatable. Had Queen Adelaide or St. Medard won, the great B.P. would have cheered for ever. The timewasunusually good—2mins. 46secs. Value of the stakes,. t4,600. Both Mr Hammond and Sir John Willoughby throw in for good stakes, though the latter has not exactly broken the ring a; he hoped to.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18840719.2.33.3

Bibliographic details

THE RACE FOR THE EPSOM DERBY., Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 4426, 19 July 1884

Word Count
890

THE RACE FOR THE EPSOM DERBY. Auckland Star, Volume XXVI, Issue 4426, 19 July 1884

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